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March 16, 2013 | By Charles Perry
Sometimes you just have to step up to a big, strapping IPA. This one is positively steely with hops, boasting 104 International Bittering Units, nearly twice as much as in the average West Coast IPA. It's also high in malt and alcohol (9.4% by volume). It pours medium amber with a huge yellowish head. The nose is brisk and outdoorsy, almost resinous with pine scent. The entry on the palate is sweet with bitterness gradually sneaking up, though not quite as much bitternesss as the 104 IBUs might suggest.
November 7, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Molson Coors Brewing Co., owner of the Coors Light, Keystone and Blue Moon brands, did fine in its recent third quarter. It's the next quarter the beer maker is nervous about. Declining consumer demand and high costs in the U.S. and central Europe, along with unfavorable currency swings in Britain and Canada, mean that the fourth quarter will likely “be the most challenging of this year,” Chief Executive Peter Swinburn said in a statement . Already, the company's British, Canadian and international units are reporting sliding sales, though profit soared 16% to $139.9 million in the U.S. during the third quarter.
March 29, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
California is leading a national craft beer explosion. It's home to 12 of the nation's 50 largest craft beer companies, according to the Brewers Assn. trade group. So it's not surprising that some of the country's finest beer is brewed locally. Here are 10 of the best local beers to sample Easter weekend, as selected by Brandon Hernandez, a beer and food journalist, Zagat editor and Stone Brewing Co. communications specialist. The beers are brewed in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties and would nicely compliment a traditional Easter dinner, Hernandez said.
August 13, 1989
Paul Grein's July 30 article, "Suds 'n' Bucks 'n' Rock 'n' Roll," cogently illustrates the beer makers' voracious appetite for profit and the "futures" market as they target the young by sponsoring rock concerts. And kudos to retiring U.S. Surgeon Gen. C. Everett Koop, quoted in the article, for his efforts to: (1) eliminate alcohol sponsorship of concerts and athletic contests where much of the audience is likely to be under the drinking age; (2) eliminate the use in alcohol ads of celebrities who appeal to youths, and (3)
July 14, 1993 | PETER H. KING
California has lost its taste for success stories. We'd rather cry in our beer and chronicle the failures--the bankruptcies and plant closures, the tumble of property values, the rumble of vans hauling away our assets. California, we tell ourselves again and again, is a loser. Say it enough, and you begin to believe it. Say it enough and you can make it come true. Here is a different kind of story.
August 15, 2012 | By James Rainey
Politicians trying to play the authenticity card can get in trouble. They can look inauthentic. Or they can disrupt business as usual. The operator of the Bud Tent at the Iowa State Fair said this week that President Obama's stop at the popular beer pit-stop cost him a lot of business - as the Secret Service choked off the flow of customers by securing the area and screening everyone who wanted to come in for a cold one. The Monday...
April 14, 2010 | By BY JASON GELT
Boxed alcoholic beverages tend to receive a gimlet eye from discerning drinkers. Wines purveyed from cardboard boxes go south quicker than their bottled brethren and often come from vintners with low marks from connoisseurs. But what about boxed beer? Why hasn't the populist sudsy brew, already an everyman's refreshment, entered the boxed beverage realm? Because it's simply more difficult to keep carbonated beer pressurized and oxygen free in large, four-liter containers, according to Thomas Hussey, a recently graduated industrial design student from Australia's University of Technology Sydney.
November 9, 2011 | By Charles Perry, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Stone is known for major attitude - its flagship IPA is named Arrogant Bastard. So you'd expect something pretty hairy from its smoked porter. In fact, it's surprisingly elegant. It pours very dark brown with a dense tan head and a nose of yeast and a hint of molasses. The smoke flavor is very subtle indeed, perhaps somewhat hidden in the roasted-malt flavors that lightly suggest coffee and chocolate. The main impression is a very polished palate - malty sweetness quickly dried out by the hops (there are a lot of hops here, but the effect is not challengingly bitter)
February 9, 2010 | T.J. Simers
A few years back, I'm sitting in the media room at the Super Bowl in Houston, Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson on stage, and I thought I saw what I thought I saw. I looked around the room, and no one else seemed to see it, the rest of the media corps apparently all reaching for the guacamole at the same time. As an investigative reporter, it was my duty to look closer, of course, and while I can't recall who was playing in the game, I was all over that story.
February 15, 2013 | By John Verive
Have you heard the buzz of excited beer fans or seen mention of a mythical beer of white-whale proportions? It's time for Pliny the Younger -- considered one of the best beers in the world --  to make its annual appearance at the better craft beer destinations in the Southland. What about the beer compels people to line up for hours, or purchase raffle tickets , just for a chance to taste it? Pliny the Younger, brewed in Santa Rosa at Russian River Brewing Co., is not to be confused with Russian River's more-common Pliny the Elder.
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