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NEWS
January 23, 2013
Do you have any suggestions for drought-tolerant, kid-friendly ground cover? We've read that dymondia works well to fill in space between pavers but haven't found any talk of how well this plant works as a grass substitute, spread across a yard. Can our kids walk barefoot? Will the dymondia attract bees? And will it flourish in an area that gets sun and shade? Julie Cho Irvine Many drought-tolerant, kid-friendly lawn alternatives thrive in Los Angeles and can save money and time in addition to water.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
If you haven't made it to "Bad Words," Jason Bateman's directing debut and sarcastic takedown of the spelling bee game, it's just become much easier to indulge in this guilty pleasure. Like Bateman's 40-year-old Guy with a grudge and unbeatable spelling chops, the movie is turning up everywhere now. The competitive spelling world, teeming with bright kids, obsessive parents and rigid educators, proves to be rich terrain for a caustic, clever comedy. The actor-director puts himself in good funny company too - Kathryn Hahn and Allison Janney among others.
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AUTOS
October 31, 2007 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Question: I am looking to the L.A. Times for help in trying to find out what is causing the orange/yellowish spots that are appearing on our cars in increasing numbers. I have lived here for 24 years and have owned white cars for all of that time. In the past four or five years I have noticed dark orange/yellow droppings on my car, about the size of a pencil eraser. Within the last two years they have increased in number. Once dried, it is very difficult to get them off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
An Arcadia sixth-grader won the Los Angeles County Office of Education Spelling Bee this week in just over an hour with the word "thrombosis. " Kai Morita, a First Avenue Middle School student, beat out 24 other contestants in fourth through sixth grade at the Almansor Court Conference Center in Alhambra on Wednesday evening. First Avenue Middle is part of the Arcadia Unified School District.  In second place was Daniel Ozaraga, a sixth-grader at Santa Fe Elementary School in the Baldwin Park Unified School District.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
See once again the connectedness of everything: Central California's almond crop is threatened by the high price of corn in places like North Dakota. And the connection, of course, is bees. Billions and billions of bees. We have previously commented on this blog about the overwhelming importance of a series of little-discussed programs under the Conservation Title XII of the Farm Bill that preserve the nation's flora and fauna. One example is the Conservation Reserve Program, or CRP, which pays farmers a fee to keep portions of their acreage out of crop production for a number of years; this set-aside aids ground-nesting birds and other critters, helps restore the soil and gives farmers an option to make a few bucks from less-than-optimal cropland or when crop prices are low. National Public Radio came out with a terrific story yesterday showing how that CRP program in North Dakota is vital to the almond crop in California's Central Valley.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
This being Utah, the self-proclaimed Beehive State, Darren Cox is an expert in -- what else -- bees. Civic fathers use the term for the population's strong work ethic, but Cox deals with the stinging, honey-producing real McCoy. Now the fourth-generation bee farmer is trying to use his recognition as this year's national beekeeper of the year to focus attention on a major threat to the industry: colony collapse disorder. Cox, 48, who lives in Logan but has 5,000 hives in Utah, California's Central Valley and Wyoming, received the award from the American Honey Producers Assn.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The plight of bees is headed to a courtroom. A coalition of beekeepers, environmentalists and consumer groups filed a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency this week, contending the agency has not done enough to protect bees from pesticides, which they say are linked to the increasing bee-colony collapse problem. The suit, filed by the Center for Food Safety, says the class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids are improperly regulated. The group calls for halting the use of the  pesticide until more is known about the effects on bees and other pollinators.
OPINION
February 16, 2014
Re "To bee, or not to bee?," Feb. 13 Like one of the bee-keepers in your article, I live in Mt. Washington. Several years ago, my former neighbor kept bees. I am allergic to bee stings and had told him so as soon as I saw the hive box in his yard. One day, as I was coming home from work, I got out of my car and threw some trash away. My trash cans are right across from my neighbor's garage, where he was trying to extract the honey, unbeknown to me. The bees attacked me as soon as I reached my trash cans.
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Los Angeles is honeybee heaven. The warm Southern California climate and long growing seasons provide year-round food for bees. The city's trees, flowers and flora are largely free of pesticides. It's the perfect place for backyard beekeeping - except that beekeeping is not legal here. That could soon change. A group of bee advocates and neighborhood councils has been lobbying the City Council to expressly allow beekeeping on single-family residential lots. Current law permits it only in areas zoned for agriculture.
SPORTS
April 6, 2010 | Eric Sondheimer
You could say that the West Valley League baseball opener between Chatsworth and Lake Balboa Birmingham high schools created quite a buzz. Literally. The game was suspended in the top of the first inning Tuesday when bees swarmed the field and eventually locked onto a chain-link fence down the third base line at Chatsworth. Observers found it hard to BEE-lieve. "I've heard of all kinds of cancellations, but never a bee-out," Birmingham Coach Matt Mowry said.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Seems like there are more stings in the headlines lately than there are on a kid who steps on a moon jellyfish. San Francisco's Leland Yee, the Democratic state senator whose fellow Democrats want to put an “ex” in front of that title ASAP, is looking at federal gun trafficking and wire fraud charges stemming from an FBI sting operation. Last year, another Democratic state senator, Ronald S. Calderon, from Montebello, was indicted in a couple of alleged pay-to-play legislative deals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Sarcastic, sanctimonious, salacious, sly, slight and surprisingly sweet, the black comedy of "Bad Words," starring and directed by Jason Bateman, is high-minded, foul-mouthed good nonsense. I had wondered where Bateman's angry itch would take him next. The script, by Andrew Dodge, his first to be produced after many years in the studio trenches, is a good match of man and material. As an actor - whether a victim trying to even the score with Melissa McCarthy in "Identity Thief" or the ruthless top firing dog in "Up in the Air" - Bateman always brings an edge to his work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
The Fresno Bee is testing a small drone aircraft that could possibly be used for news reporting purposes, the Business Journal reported this week. “This is a new thing and it's way down the pike,” Tom Cullinan, president and publisher of the Fresno Bee, told the Business Journal. “We saw it demonstrated and the cost is reasonable.” The quadcopter would possibly be used for aerial photography of accidents, fires, farmland and waterways, the Journal reported.  Cullinan said the remote-controlled drone would also come in handy in situations where reporters are unable to get to a news scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
A 71-year-old woman stung about 1,000 times by "killer bees" in Palm Desert was recovering in the hospital, officials said. Five firefighters and a few neighbors also got stung before the dangerous hive could be removed in Thursday night's attack, officials said. People who live in the community where the incident occurred are still shaken up by the attack by Africanized honey bees, also known as "killer bees. " "Hopefully they are gone for good," resident Galye Clark told KESQ-TV . She said this was not the first time bees have found their way to the Palm Desert neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
A woman and a teenager were hospitalized after being attacked by bees when a car hit a tree containing a hive in La Canada Flintridge, authorities said. A collision between two cars occurred around 2:50 p.m. on the 200 block of Los Amigos Street, according to a news release from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. One of the cars slammed into a tree, aggravating the hive of bees that swarmed the drivers after they got out of their vehicles and attempted to exchange information, said Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By a Times staff writer
A 71-year-old woman in Palm Desert is recovering after being stung by a swarm of 75,000 Africanized honey bees, officials said. Cal Fire Battalion Chief Mark Williams told the Press-Enterprise that the woman suffered more than 1,000 bee stings in the attack Thursday. She was hospitalized but is expected to recover, officials said. "She was covered as if she had on a bee suit, and we threw her in back of ambulance, where our guys sustained bee stings," Williams told KESQ-TV.  Officials said the bees flew out of a Verizon telephone vault that a worker had opened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
A woman and a teenager were hospitalized after being attacked by bees when a car hit a tree containing a hive in La Canada Flintridge, authorities said. A collision between two cars occurred around 2:50 p.m. on the 200 block of Los Amigos Street, according to a news release from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. One of the cars slammed into a tree, aggravating the hive of bees that swarmed the drivers after they got out of their vehicles and attempted to exchange information, said Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2013 | By Lauren Williams
A swarm of bees attacked three workers at a golf course in Costa Mesa, authorities said Sunday. Responding firefighters used foam to disperse the bees that attacked the workers who were suspended in a lift about 40 to 50 feet above the ground to work on a tower, according to the fire department. The incident occurred at about 2:30 p.m. The workers suffered multiple bee stings. They were treated and taken to a hospital.  A bee company crew responded to the scene and was able to spray the hive using a ladder.  ALSO: Hiker killed at Eaton Canyon was 17-year-old girl Pain doctor's office raided in prescription drug abuse probe Bauhaus rocker Peter Murphy denies he was drunk when arrested lauren.williams@latimes.com
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Legendary -- "very famous or well-known" -- How a Jackson County Spelling Bee coordinator  two weeks ago described running out of words to give to seventh-grader Kush Sharma and fifth-grader Sophia Hoffman in Kansas City, Mo. The pair survived 66 rounds before the list of words was exhausted. Slobber -- " to let saliva or liquid flow from your mouth " -- One of the words spelled Saturday when the pair reconnected for another 29 rounds. Boodle -- " a collection or lot of persons " -- What the Helzberg Auditorium at the Kansas City Central Library saw Saturday, forcing organizers to set up a television outside, allowing more people to see the duel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Perry
A 67-year-old man who was working outdoors on his property died Thursday after suffering numerous bee stings, the San Diego County Sheriff's Department said. When deputies, responding to an emergency call, arrived at the Valley Center property, the man was already unresponsive, officials said. The man may have disturbed a beehive while burning brush. The county medical examiner will determine the cause of death. The man's name was not released. About 55 people die in the U.S. each year from bee, wasp or hornet stings, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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