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Belarus Elections

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NEWS
June 25, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a huge political upset, a dour young corruption fighter who favors closer ties with Russia was on the brink Friday of winning an election and becoming this tiny country's first president. According to preliminary returns, Alexander G. Lukashenko, at 39 the youngest of six candidates, earned 45.1% of the vote in this sleepy, Utah-sized corner of the former Soviet Union. Vyacheslav F. Kebich, the 58-year-old prime minister and odds-on favorite, came in a distant second with 17.
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WORLD
December 20, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
After 16 years in office, Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko appeared headed for another five-year term in a controversial election Sunday that was quickly followed by violent late-night street clashes and accusations of vote fraud from human rights groups. Final results announced by the state's central election commission indicated that the autocratic 56-year-old leader, who adheres to a bygone Soviet economic model, received 79.7% of the vote, after 100% was counted. Opposition leaders called on their supporters to launch a protest in downtown Minsk's Oktyabrskaya Square before firm results were announced.
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NEWS
November 26, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bucking a democratic and reformist trend in what was Soviet-dominated Eastern Europe, the president of Belarus claimed victory Monday in a fraud-tainted referendum that proposed restarting his five-year term with sweeping new powers. In two weeks of balloting that ended Sunday, election officials said, 70.5% of registered voters endorsed constitutional changes giving President Alexander G.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Opposition leaders in Belarus challenged the validity of parliamentary elections, contesting the government's turnout claims. With opposition candidates largely excluded from the ballot, turnout Sunday became a key indicator of support for authoritarian President Alexander G. Lukashenko's government. Opposition parties had called on voters to boycott the election. Turnout must exceed 50% to be valid. The government said turnout was 60.6%; the opposition put it at about 45%. The U.S.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Ukraine and Belarus, whose leaders conspired to break up the Soviet Union 2 1/2 years ago, have elected presidents favoring closer ties with Russia, official returns showed Monday. The turnabout is expected to give Moscow greater sway over its old empire.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
A fiery anti-corruption crusader scored a landslide victory as Belarussian voters turned out in force Sunday to elect the former Soviet republic's first president. Alexander Lukashenko--dubbed the "Belarussian Zhirinovsky" by critics who compare his populist tactics and outspokenness to those of Russian right-winger Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky--received 80% of the vote against Prime Minister Vyacheslav Kebich, according to Reuters news service.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the eve of presidential elections that may determine if this nation remains independent, the editor of its largest newspaper complained about the new red-and-white flag. "It's too nationalistic," said Igor N. Osinsky, editor of Sovietskaya Belarossiya. Nor does the 700-year-old heraldic mounted knight, recently retrieved from history's dustbin, inspire the editor to patriotism. "We don't like warlike symbols," he said. "No one knows who that armed horseman is, or where he's going."
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another rout for reformers in the former Soviet Union, a pro-Communist ex-police official was elected head of state in Belarus on Friday. Mechislav Grib, 57, who advocates closer economic and military ties with Russia, was chosen on the second ballot by a vote of 183-55 to succeed ousted liberal reformer Stanislav Shushkevich as Speaker of Parliament.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Opposition leaders in Belarus challenged the validity of parliamentary elections, contesting the government's turnout claims. With opposition candidates largely excluded from the ballot, turnout Sunday became a key indicator of support for authoritarian President Alexander G. Lukashenko's government. Opposition parties had called on voters to boycott the election. Turnout must exceed 50% to be valid. The government said turnout was 60.6%; the opposition put it at about 45%. The U.S.
NEWS
June 21, 1994
Conservative Prime Minister Vyacheslav Kebich is the favorite in a field of six in Thursday's presidential elections in the former Soviet republic of Belarus. And he helped his chances earlier this month with a classic political stroke, slashing prices on bread, butter and meat. The presidential post was created by the country's recently adopted constitution.
NEWS
November 26, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bucking a democratic and reformist trend in what was Soviet-dominated Eastern Europe, the president of Belarus claimed victory Monday in a fraud-tainted referendum that proposed restarting his five-year term with sweeping new powers. In two weeks of balloting that ended Sunday, election officials said, 70.5% of registered voters endorsed constitutional changes giving President Alexander G.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Ukraine and Belarus, whose leaders conspired to break up the Soviet Union 2 1/2 years ago, have elected presidents favoring closer ties with Russia, official returns showed Monday. The turnabout is expected to give Moscow greater sway over its old empire.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
A fiery anti-corruption crusader scored a landslide victory as Belarussian voters turned out in force Sunday to elect the former Soviet republic's first president. Alexander Lukashenko--dubbed the "Belarussian Zhirinovsky" by critics who compare his populist tactics and outspokenness to those of Russian right-winger Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky--received 80% of the vote against Prime Minister Vyacheslav Kebich, according to Reuters news service.
NEWS
June 25, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a huge political upset, a dour young corruption fighter who favors closer ties with Russia was on the brink Friday of winning an election and becoming this tiny country's first president. According to preliminary returns, Alexander G. Lukashenko, at 39 the youngest of six candidates, earned 45.1% of the vote in this sleepy, Utah-sized corner of the former Soviet Union. Vyacheslav F. Kebich, the 58-year-old prime minister and odds-on favorite, came in a distant second with 17.
NEWS
June 23, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the eve of presidential elections that may determine if this nation remains independent, the editor of its largest newspaper complained about the new red-and-white flag. "It's too nationalistic," said Igor N. Osinsky, editor of Sovietskaya Belarossiya. Nor does the 700-year-old heraldic mounted knight, recently retrieved from history's dustbin, inspire the editor to patriotism. "We don't like warlike symbols," he said. "No one knows who that armed horseman is, or where he's going."
NEWS
June 21, 1994
Conservative Prime Minister Vyacheslav Kebich is the favorite in a field of six in Thursday's presidential elections in the former Soviet republic of Belarus. And he helped his chances earlier this month with a classic political stroke, slashing prices on bread, butter and meat. The presidential post was created by the country's recently adopted constitution.
WORLD
December 20, 2010 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
After 16 years in office, Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko appeared headed for another five-year term in a controversial election Sunday that was quickly followed by violent late-night street clashes and accusations of vote fraud from human rights groups. Final results announced by the state's central election commission indicated that the autocratic 56-year-old leader, who adheres to a bygone Soviet economic model, received 79.7% of the vote, after 100% was counted. Opposition leaders called on their supporters to launch a protest in downtown Minsk's Oktyabrskaya Square before firm results were announced.
WORLD
March 29, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Arrests in demonstrations since Belarus' elections last week have reached at least 1,000, lawyers and human rights activists said Tuesday, and jailed Belarus presidential candidate Alexander Kozulin has been notified that he could face six years in prison. "This is the first time we've seen such mass arrests in Belarus. I can remember nothing of this kind in the past," said Ales Byalyatsky, head of the human rights organization Vyasna-96.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another rout for reformers in the former Soviet Union, a pro-Communist ex-police official was elected head of state in Belarus on Friday. Mechislav Grib, 57, who advocates closer economic and military ties with Russia, was chosen on the second ballot by a vote of 183-55 to succeed ousted liberal reformer Stanislav Shushkevich as Speaker of Parliament.
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