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OPINION
February 20, 2014 | Meghan Daum
It's an idea that, in the death-squeamish U.S., is probably too disturbing for the edgiest TV hospital drama, let alone real life and real legislation. Last week, the Belgian Parliament passed a law allowing terminally ill children to request aid in dying. Adults there have been able to do that since 2002, and a few other European countries have similar measures. But last Thursday's action, which is expected to be signed into law by King Philippe, will make Belgium the first to extend the right to minors faced with "constant and unbearable suffering.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's easy to feel a certain fatigue as awards season drags along, with even the most dedicated Oscar-ologists tiring of talking about the same boiled-down pool of a few films. So this may be just the time to turn to the lesser-known quarters of the Oscar ballot, such as the relatively obscure corners of the foreign language film category. It is widely anticipated that the prize will go to either Italy's "The Great Beauty," which picked up similar prizes at the Golden Globes and BAFTAs, or Denmark's "The Hunt," which stars actor Mads Mikkelsen, currently seen on the U.S. television show "Hannibal.
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NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
This summer, a Belgian theme park will add an $8-million Viking land based on a television cartoon and movie series with two rides and a restaurant set in a lakeside village. The 12-acre Vicky the Viking themed land will be built on the location of a former theater at Belgium's Plopsaland De Panne, located along the North Sea about 90 minutes west of Brussels. A clever but timid 10-year-old boy who lives in a Viking village, Vicky is the star of a German-Austrian television cartoon series and the "Wickie the Viking" live-action films.
OPINION
February 20, 2014 | Meghan Daum
It's an idea that, in the death-squeamish U.S., is probably too disturbing for the edgiest TV hospital drama, let alone real life and real legislation. Last week, the Belgian Parliament passed a law allowing terminally ill children to request aid in dying. Adults there have been able to do that since 2002, and a few other European countries have similar measures. But last Thursday's action, which is expected to be signed into law by King Philippe, will make Belgium the first to extend the right to minors faced with "constant and unbearable suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By David Ng
For opera fans in Southern California, Christoph Waltz has become a semi-regular presence in the audience of Los Angeles Opera productions at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. On Sunday, the two-time Academy Award winning actor officially made his debut as an opera director with a new production of "Der Rosenkavalier" in Belgium. Waltz's production premiered at the Vlaamse Opera in Antwerp with plans to travel to the Royal Opera in London in 2016. (The London cast is expected to include Renee Fleming.)
BUSINESS
October 4, 2011 | From Reuters
France and Belgium rushed to the aid of Dexia on Tuesday, in what will be the first state rescue of a European bank in the euro zone sovereign debt crisis. The lender to hundreds of French and Belgian towns, which also needed propping up after the 2008 financial crisis, will see its French municipal finance arm broken off and put under the ownership of French state banks. The rescue plan also looks likely to involve a broader break-up, with the sale of healthier operations, such as its Belgian and Turkish banking businesses, as well as the creation of a state-guaranteed pool of toxic assets.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
Insight Vacations is offering a moderately paced “Country Roads of Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands” excursion that manages to pack in a number of stops as well as lots of free time to explore on your own. Highlights of the 12-day motor coach tour include two nights in sophisticated Brussels and visits to the Chinese and Japanese pavilions; a journey to the site of the Battle of Waterloo; the city of Bruges, known for its lace and the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989 | From Reuters
Belgium had 474 reported cases of AIDS by the end of March, 1989, up 40% from the same time last year, the Health Ministry said Monday. A ministry statement said almost 30% of acquired immune deficiency syndrome sufferers caught the disease through heterosexual contact, a figure it said was one of the highest in Europe.
TRAVEL
April 18, 1993
Thank you for most enjoyable and nostalgic reads in your two pieces on Belgium ("Brussels Blooms," March 21, and "The Venice of Belgium," Aug. 9). I lived in Belgium for nine years during my childhood as a refugee from Cologne during World War II. Life was very grim then. I spent over two years in hiding from the Nazis in Rochefort. Yet I have very fond memories of the country. I agree that tourists have overlooked Belgium for far too long and that the country is a treasure to be discovered and appreciated.
NEWS
May 7, 1986 | From Reuters
Belgium was hit Tuesday by a 24-hour strike by public service trade unions that crippled bus, train and plane services, closed schools and halted postal services. The strike is in protest of an austerity program being drafted by the government that is expected to cut unemployment benefits, lay off hundreds of teachers and boost the costs of health care and public transport.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
The Belgian government this week approved new measures allowing the euthanasia of terminally ill children, a decision that on first reading would make most of us gasp. It is a distressing concept, and the idea of helping a child die sounds incredibly cold and morally and ethically unsound - until you dive into the issue. While it raises painful and conflicting emotions, and choices, the Belgians - who have pushed assisted suicide to the edge before - are on the right, groundbreaking track.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
Insight Vacations is offering a moderately paced “Country Roads of Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands” excursion that manages to pack in a number of stops as well as lots of free time to explore on your own. Highlights of the 12-day motor coach tour include two nights in sophisticated Brussels and visits to the Chinese and Japanese pavilions; a journey to the site of the Battle of Waterloo; the city of Bruges, known for its lace and the...
TRAVEL
January 12, 2014 | Jane Levere
One became a prime minister. Another a songwriter whose compositions included "White Christmas. " And a third became an Angeleno who married, raised a family and became a social worker. All extraordinary in their own ways, all on an extraordinary journey poignantly recounted at the Red Star Line Museum in Antwerp. The emigration experiences of Golda Meir, Israel's first female prime minister; Irving Berlin, whose song Bing Crosby famously crooned; and Bessie Cohen, who moved to East Los Angeles in 1937, are among those of the 2 million immigrants who came to the United States from Europe from 1878 to 1934 on ships operated by the Antwerp-based Red Star Line.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By David Ng
For opera fans in Southern California, Christoph Waltz has become a semi-regular presence in the audience of Los Angeles Opera productions at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. On Sunday, the two-time Academy Award winning actor officially made his debut as an opera director with a new production of "Der Rosenkavalier" in Belgium. Waltz's production premiered at the Vlaamse Opera in Antwerp with plans to travel to the Royal Opera in London in 2016. (The London cast is expected to include Renee Fleming.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Sam Adams
The foreign-language film field for the 2014 Academy Awards is an uncommonly strong one, incorporating the luscious fever dream "The Grand Beauty" (Italy), the heartbreaking family drama "Ilo Ilo" (Philippines) and "Gris Gris" (Chad), the story of a man pulled into the world of gas smuggling, among so many others. But it's often the story behind the film that matters as much as the film itself. Haifaa Mansour's "Wadjda," for instance, is not only Saudi Arabia's first submission to the Oscars but the first feature ever shot in the country, whose ultraconservative government views cinema as a corrupt art form.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013
Wilfried Martens, 77, the resilient Belgian prime minister who led nine governments and deepened Belgium's integration in the European Union, died Wednesday at his home in Lokeren, in East Flanders. A family statement confirming his death did not provide a cause, but Martens had a history of heart problems and had been in failing health in the last year. From his campaign as a student activist for greater use of the Dutch language at the 1958 World's Fair in Brussels, Martens played a role in a series of constitutional reforms that handed powers from the central government to the linguistically divided regions of the country where Dutch is generally spoken in the north and French in the south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
On Dec. 16, 1944, 21-year-old Army Cpl. Gordon Hearne found himself in an hours-long gun battle with German soldiers in the Belgium countryside — one of countless such stories that marked the beginning of the Battle of the Bulge, Germany's last major offensive and a turning point in World War II. On Saturday, Hearne, now 87, was formally thanked by King Albert II of Belgium for his service. In a ceremony at Taix French Restaurant in Echo Park, Hearne was awarded the Knight of the Order of the Crown by Belgium's consul general in Los Angeles.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
The Belgian government this week approved new measures allowing the euthanasia of terminally ill children, a decision that on first reading would make most of us gasp. It is a distressing concept, and the idea of helping a child die sounds incredibly cold and morally and ethically unsound - until you dive into the issue. While it raises painful and conflicting emotions, and choices, the Belgians - who have pushed assisted suicide to the edge before - are on the right, groundbreaking track.
SCIENCE
October 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
They call it the "God particle. " It holds the key to humanity's presence on Earth - indeed, to the existence of all the matter in the universe. Feuding nations have set aside their differences and devoted billions of dollars to finding it. Scientists built massive supercolliders capable of producing temperatures nearly as frigid as the coldest spots in outer space in their quest to unravel its secrets. Even then, it took nearly half a century to get a glimpse of the thing. Now, in a crowning moment, two theoretical physicists have won the Nobel Prize in physics for having the gumption to envision that such a thing might have existed in the first place.
SPORTS
October 5, 2013 | Staff and wire reports
Simone Biles edged teammate Kyla Ross to give the U.S. women's gymnastics team a sweep of the first two places in the all-around competition Friday in the world championships at Antwerp, Belgium. Biles, 16, also qualified for all four apparatus finals this weekend, the first female U.S. gymnast to do so since Shannon Miller in 1991. Ross, a 16-year-old from Aliso Viejo, led by 0.016 points going into the floor routine, but Biles finished impressively for an overall score of 60.216 points to Ross' 59.332.
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