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OPINION
June 27, 2008
Re "In Russia, Jesus enters the classroom," June 23 It comes as no surprise to see Christianity holding new sway over the Russian people and their leaders. Once the thin crust of the Soviet Union cracked and fell away, the rock-hard core of Orthodox Christianity saw the light of day again. One only has to take a brief look at the history of Russia to appreciate the total integration of Russian culture with the Orthodox Christian belief system. My Russian grandparents may have given up their homeland 100 years ago to come to America, but they would never give up their deep-rooted belief in the Almighty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Unless one is Native American, getting a grasp of complex Native American spiritual cosmologies is not easy. And that distinction, which might be called a quality of profound otherness, is in essence what drives a fascinating show recently opened at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park. It's a story of survival, of a will to endure in the face of crushing opposition. And it is a story told through beads. "Floral Journey: Native North American Beadwork" might sound like a simple decorative display of ornamented handiwork.
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NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama used a Rose Garden news conference with the president of Mexico and prime minister of Canada to reject the political argument of his likely Republican opponent that he's insufficiently committed to the notion of American exceptionalism. GOP frontrunner Mitt Romney, in a speech to conservatives in a suburb of Wisconsin on Saturday, continued a line of attack that has been made by other Republicans during the primary battle, saying Obama "doesn't have the same feelings about American exceptionalism that we do. " "And I think over the last three or four years, some people around the world have begun to question that," the former Massachusetts governor said, according to the Washington Post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gottlieb
The highest-paid pensioner in California's largest retirement system continues to receive more than $500,000 annually, even though officials promised almost two years ago his retirement pay would be dramatically cut. After an angry state senator confronted them Thursday, pension officials said they would cut the payments to former Vernon administrator Bruce Malkenhorst to almost $116,000 a year starting in April. "I told them very directly that I'm livid beyond belief," said state Sen. Kevin de Leon (D-Los Angeles)
TRAVEL
June 3, 1990
In today's travel market, the price of lodging has increased at an exponential rate. Hotel prices, even outside metropolitan areas, are beyond belief. B&Bs no longer provide economy rates. And if the room rates weren't bad enough, restaurant and bar prices are worse. What's a poor traveler to do? NORMAN WILLIAMSON Claremont
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1985
Cal Thomas' criticism (Editorial Pages, Oct. 21) of the Boy Scouts of America's executive board is demagogic. His essential charge is that the Boy Scout organization compromised its principles by deleting a belief in God as a prerequisite for membership. He then equated this so-called compromise with hypothetically allowing the Scouts to litter. This is pure theological double talk. If someone believes that charity is a good then that belief can be translated into action in many different ways: fund-raising drives, relief work, advertising, etc. If someone believes in environmentalism then that belief can be manifested by anti-litter drives, demonstrations, clean-up work, legal action, etc. On the other hand, a belief in God has no necessitating commensurate action arising out of that belief.
SPORTS
February 2, 2014 | By David Wharton and Sergei L. Loiko
SOCHI, Russia - Tired of hearing reports about alleged corruption and budget overruns, some Russian citizens have given the 2014 Sochi Olympics a nickname. Kickbacktiada. The Games, which begin Friday, rank as the most expensive in Olympic history with an estimated cost of more than $50 billion and counting. A recent study by a Russian watchdog group alleges that organizers paid far more than the going rate for numerous venues built in and around the Black Sea resort.
OPINION
October 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Why did Gov. Jerry Brown bother signing a law to encourage childhood vaccinations if his immediate intent was to undermine it? With rising numbers of parents succumbing to discredited fears that childhood inoculations cause autism, AB 2109 was supposed to tighten the state's lax rules that allow parents to exempt their children from vaccinations based on "personal belief. " Under the law, parents could still send their children to public school without the vaccinations, but first they would have to submit a form signed by a health professional showing that they had been informed about the risks and benefits of immunization.
SCIENCE
April 26, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have revealed one of the reasons why some folks are less religious than others: They think more analytically, rather than going with their gut. And thinking analytically can cause religious belief to wane - for skeptics and true believers alike. The study, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, indicates that belief may be a more malleable feature of the human psyche than those of strong faith may think. The cognitive origins of belief - and disbelief - traditionally haven't been explored with academic rigor, said lead author Will Gervais, a social psychologist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.
HEALTH
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Woolston
Now that people in Colorado (and, soon, Washington state) can buy marijuana about as easily as they can pick up a 12-pack of Bud Light, it's a good time to ask: How risky is it to turn to pot? President Obama has already shared his opinion, telling the New Yorker magazine, "I don't think [marijuana] is more dangerous than alcohol. " The president's opinion stands in stark contrast with official federal policy that still classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, putting it in the same class as heroin and LSD. In this case, the president seems to be more correct than the government, says Richard Miller, professor of pharmacology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.
SPORTS
February 9, 2014 | By Jared S. Hopkins
SOCHI, Russia -- It's never easy being the youngest. But what if you had to live up to the standards of your much older and established sibling and do it while sharing your room with someone you had little in common with? Then you might have a sense of what it is like to be short-track speedskating at the Olympics. When short track begins Monday in only its seventh Games, it does so with a bit of second-class-citizen status to speedskating, the sport's traditional discipline.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2014 | By Jonathan Guthrie
When asked how he went bankrupt, a character in Ernest Hemingway's novel "The Sun Also Rises" replies: "Two ways. Gradually and then suddenly. " This neat summation of how business failure creeps up on victims is quoted in "Big Bang Disruption: Strategy In The Age of Devastating Innovation," a new book with more than a whiff of apocalyptic prophecy about it. The book, published by Portfolio Hardcover, plays to the belief that technology has...
SPORTS
February 2, 2014 | By David Wharton and Sergei L. Loiko
SOCHI, Russia - Tired of hearing reports about alleged corruption and budget overruns, some Russian citizens have given the 2014 Sochi Olympics a nickname. Kickbacktiada. The Games, which begin Friday, rank as the most expensive in Olympic history with an estimated cost of more than $50 billion and counting. A recent study by a Russian watchdog group alleges that organizers paid far more than the going rate for numerous venues built in and around the Black Sea resort.
SPORTS
December 17, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
Kobe Bryant has this thing he does, just when the Lakers are moments from being flattened by an oncoming train, he smiles and says, "What whistle?" Call it the no-look quote. Bryant has been doing this for years, his normal confidence level going into beast mode whenever his team is truly in peril. The swagger he brings into the final minutes of a game is wildly heightened when his team is in the final minutes before a meltdown. In Bryant's world, it's always dawn before the darkest.
SPORTS
December 14, 2013 | By Bill Dwyre
Betfair Hollywood Park had its last big day of racing Saturday, and Hall of Fame trainer Jerry Hollendorfer had a big day. His 2-year-old, Shared Belief, owned in part by television personality Jim Rome, won the 33rd and final chapter of the CashCall Futurity, a $750,000 race that annually establishes at least one top prospect for the Kentucky Derby. It was the final chapter because its home, Hollywood Park, will close its doors after racing next Sunday. A real estate development is projected to replace the legendary Inglewood racing facility.
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
The last CashCall Futurity to be run at a soon-to-be-closing Betfair Hollywood Park will feature a 13-horse field of 2-year-olds, each trying to establish himself as a Kentucky Derby contenders. The winner Saturday will receive 10 points toward that Derby entry the first day in May. Trainer Jerry Hollendorfer's Shared Belief has been made the morning line favorite at 7-2, followed by another Hollendorfer horse, Tamarando, at 4-1. John Sadler's Kobe's Back shares the third favored spot with Bob Baffert's Tap It Rich, both at 9-2. The $750,000 race will be run at 1 1/16 miles and will mark the 33rd and final race in the Hollywood Park series.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to jump into a growing legal dispute between the Obama administration and businesses run by conservative Christians over whether a company must pay for birth control drugs that conflict with its owner's religious beliefs. The decision to hear the cases, which could affect millions of women with employer-provided health plans, means that for a second time, the justices will decide the fate of a key part of President Obama's healthcare law. Last year, the court in a 5-4 decision upheld the requirement that individuals obtain basic health insurance or pay a tax penalty.
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