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OPINION
November 13, 1994
The only ding-dongs in "The Bell Curve" are the ones who wrote it. ANGIE PAPADAKIS Rancho Palos Verdes
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SPORTS
September 11, 2008 | Chris Foster, Times Staff Writer
The pendulum swung for UCLA quarterback Kevin Craft, and the Monday morning quarterbacking was easy to predict. Craft was a bum, throwing four passes for interceptions in the first half against Tennessee in the opener. Craft was a hero, taking the Bruins on two fourth-quarter touchdown drives that led to a 27-24 overtime victory. Neither moniker has stuck just yet. The indications from the first game are that things can go either way. But in the week since the game, Craft has seemed more poised in practice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1994
Carol Tavris' comments on "The Bell Curve" are misleading (Commentary, Nov. 9). She states the book is based on a "fatal error," that genetic variation, which can account for differences among individuals, can also explain differences between groups. She says that blacks and whites are like seeds brought up in different soil (different environments), which "can" explain group differences. But since blacks were compared to whites of equal socioeconomic status, she must conclude that the children of black doctors, lawyers and professionals are exposed to environments as detrimental as that of a ghetto.
SPORTS
September 4, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
There doesn't seem to be a limit on cliches in college football, especially about the effects of getting tackled, but getting your "bell rung" ranks way up there, along with "that's got to hurt," "he coughed up the football," "looks like we've got a player shaken up" and "he's going to feel that one on Monday." Brigham Young flattened Northern Iowa, 41-17, but Cougars quarterback Max Hall took a hard hit in the fourth quarter of the game Saturday. By all accounts, yes, he got his bell rung, although we're not sure to what degree, or is it pitch?
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
"The Bell Curve," a book that claims intelligence is a genetically linked characteristic of race, is scientifically flawed, a panel of scholars and testing experts said this week. In a symposium at Howard University in Washington, D.C., scholars said the book fails to present a scientifically balanced view and then uses faulty conclusions to justify suggested changes in the way society deals with the poor.
SPORTS
September 4, 2008 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
There doesn't seem to be a limit on cliches in college football, especially about the effects of getting tackled, but getting your "bell rung" ranks way up there, along with "that's got to hurt," "he coughed up the football," "looks like we've got a player shaken up" and "he's going to feel that one on Monday." Brigham Young flattened Northern Iowa, 41-17, but Cougars quarterback Max Hall took a hard hit in the fourth quarter of the game Saturday. By all accounts, yes, he got his bell rung, although we're not sure to what degree, or is it pitch?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1994 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and co-edits a newsletter, CounterPunch, whose latest issue addresses "The Bell Curve" and Proposition 187.
The authors of "The Bell Curve" and the immigrant-haters behind Proposition 187 all drink from the same polluted stream that has watered race hygienists and ethnic cleansers back to the founder of the pseudoscience of eugenics, Darwin's half-cousin Francis Galton; and back to important begetters of the sister pseudoscience of IQ testing. Open up Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray's "The Bell Curve" and glance at the introduction, where the authors list their intellectual ancestry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | CAROL TAVRIS, Carol Tavris, a social psychologist in Los Angeles, is the author, with Carole Wade, of "Psychology in Perspective," to be published next month by Harper Collins.
As I follow the debate over Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray's "The Bell Curve," I am struck yet again by how difficult it is for Americans to think intelligently about intelligence. Partly this is because the history of research on IQ, heredity and race is marked with such loathsome prejudice. Early in this century, H. H. Goddard, a leading educator, gave IQ tests to immigrants, including the non-English-speaking, as they arrived at Ellis Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1994
The debate over "The Bell Curve" continues on your editorial pages, but I have yet to hear or read of anyone challenging some unstated premises: Intelligence equals success and success equals wealth. How many intelligent people would be successful if "cunning" were filtered out of their personalities? Is intelligence at the top of the list of most admired virtues? Why, because it creates wealth? If the goal were to develop a happier and wiser society, would intelligence be vying for the top spot with wisdom, honesty and compassion?
BUSINESS
July 8, 2002
With more than 10,000 mutual funds to choose from, many investors cringe at the task of making selections. With today's special quarterly fund report, The Times and independent research firm Morningstar Inc. provide several ways to evaluate funds--including measurements designed to help investors determine a fund's performance relative to its peers using Morningstar's revamped "star" system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001
Re "Reform Bills Could Set Schools Up for Failure," July 18: Even given The Times' ongoing vendetta against public school teachers, I find it hard to understand why your reporting on "Texas-style education reform" is so consistently passive and shallow. If your reporter were to check the facts behind the hype, he'd discover that Texas' success has in great part been thanks to a statistical shell game, where underachieving and problem students are expelled or transferred in large numbers and shifted to what amounts to another set of books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1995
Re "Statistics Can Throw Us a Curve," Jan. 4: Your science writer, K.C. Cole, has joined many others in criticizing "The Bell Curve," and like others Cole's critique seems pointless. Quoting mathematicians, for example, Cole writes, "Correlation, they say, does not necessarily mean causation." The authors of the book agree, and further point out (Page 298), "That a trait is genetically transmitted in individuals does not mean that group differences in that trait are also genetic in origin."
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
There is a direct correlation, mathematicians have found, between children's achievement on math tests and shoe size. A clear signal that big feet make you smarter? And what about the striking link, documented in the early part of this century, between increasing pollution and rising birth rates in the Los Angeles Basin? Does breathing bad air make people fertile? And what, for that matter, should be made of studies that connect skin color with IQ scores?
NEWS
December 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
"The Bell Curve," a book that claims intelligence is a genetically linked characteristic of race, is scientifically flawed, a panel of scholars and testing experts said this week. In a symposium at Howard University in Washington, D.C., scholars said the book fails to present a scientifically balanced view and then uses faulty conclusions to justify suggested changes in the way society deals with the poor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2001
Re "Reform Bills Could Set Schools Up for Failure," July 18: Even given The Times' ongoing vendetta against public school teachers, I find it hard to understand why your reporting on "Texas-style education reform" is so consistently passive and shallow. If your reporter were to check the facts behind the hype, he'd discover that Texas' success has in great part been thanks to a statistical shell game, where underachieving and problem students are expelled or transferred in large numbers and shifted to what amounts to another set of books.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
There is a direct correlation, mathematicians have found, between children's achievement on math tests and shoe size. A clear signal that big feet make you smarter? And what about the striking link, documented in the early part of this century, between increasing pollution and rising birth rates in the Los Angeles Basin? Does breathing bad air make people fertile? And what, for that matter, should be made of studies that connect skin color with IQ scores?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1994
The debate over "The Bell Curve" continues on your editorial pages, but I have yet to hear or read of anyone challenging some unstated premises: Intelligence equals success and success equals wealth. How many intelligent people would be successful if "cunning" were filtered out of their personalities? Is intelligence at the top of the list of most admired virtues? Why, because it creates wealth? If the goal were to develop a happier and wiser society, would intelligence be vying for the top spot with wisdom, honesty and compassion?
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