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December 14, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many of his patients and colleagues, Ignacio Aguilar, 63, is known as a licensed clinical social worker with 18 years of experience. He has a framed master's degree from USC to prove it. But to others who seek him out, Aguilar is known as "the witch doctor." "Some of my own colleagues call me the witch doctor. It doesn't really bother me," he says, referring to his status in the Latino and mental-health communities as a curandero, or folk healer.
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NEWS
December 14, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many of his patients and colleagues, Ignacio Aguilar, 63, is known as a licensed clinical social worker with 18 years of experience. He has a framed master's degree from USC to prove it. But to others who seek him out, Aguilar is known as "the witch doctor." "Some of my own colleagues call me the witch doctor. It doesn't really bother me," he says, referring to his status in the Latino and mental-health communities as a curandero, or folk healer.
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NEWS
April 5, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man stood with his hands dangling at his sides, staring vacuously at the woman before him, as the audience watched from folding chairs placed in a semicircle. "I get sick of not seeing you working," the woman said in Spanish. "I want you to do something." He shrugged. "I've changed," the man said. "I've come back because I want to be a family again. I'm not the furniture you thought I was."
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man stood with his hands dangling at his sides, staring vacuously at the woman before him, as the audience watched from folding chairs placed in a semicircle. "I get sick of not seeing you working," the woman said in Spanish. "I want you to do something." He shrugged. "I've changed," the man said. "I've come back because I want to be a family again. I'm not the furniture you thought I was."
SPORTS
July 5, 1994 | Times staff writer David W. Myers catches up with former Dodgers and Angels
Outfielder Landreaux made his debut with the Angels in 1977 but was sent to Minnesota two years later in a trade that brought Rod Carew to Anaheim. He was traded to the Dodgers in 1981 and helped them to three divisional titles before retiring in 1987. Landreaux, 39, said he battled alcohol and drug problems after he quit playing. But he got sober a few years ago and is now a family and drug-abuse counselor at Bellwood Health Center in Bellflower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS
Aetna Life Insurance Co. has reached a confidential settlement with one of the main defendants in a massive lawsuit accusing psychiatric care providers of orchestrating a sprawling billing fraud scam in Orange and Los Angeles counties. The two-year dispute between Aetna and the Pasadena-based Paracelsus Healthcare Corp., has been settled "on terms that are satisfactory to Aetna," the insurance company's lead attorney, Marvin Wexler of New York, said Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1992 | Times researcher CATHERINE GOTTLIEB
Placid Downey is no Bell Gardens, where a Latino majority last year recalled a primarily Anglo city council. But this one time Anglo suburb next door to Bell Gardens is in the midst of an identity change. Before too long, Latinos, African-Americans and Asians will become the majority. Downey is trying to absorb its newcomers without losing its family atmosphere. Residents are proud of their Beaver Cleaver reputation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From descriptions of the nighttime ritual and objects in thehouse, it appears that Federico Padres Mexia was not part of an identifiable religious movement, according to people familiar with various spiritual traditions. Rather, he appeared to combine religious practices from Christianity and folk, or neo-pagan, beliefs that might appeal to struggling people seeking to change their luck.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From descriptions of the nighttime ritual and objects in the house, it appears that Federico Padres Mexia was not part of an identifiable religious movement, according to people familiar with various spiritual traditions. Rather, he appeared to combine religious practices from Christianity and folk, or neo-pagan, beliefs that might appeal to struggling people seeking to change their luck.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The programs offered tender solace to the sad and sleepless. To the overwrought, the overweight, the drug-dependent and the spiritually confused, they extended a friendly hand. One program, run by charismatic Christians, claimed to "truly understand your pain," pledging in its advertisements to "love you, not judge you." Another was conceived by a former addict who had crashed to the bottom and climbed doggedly back. They all were part of a sprawling, sinister scam, a major insurer contends.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was feeling deeply depressed. The advertisement on late-night TV said she could get free counseling. So the woman, a 37-year-old mental health professional, called an 800 number and was given an address. When she arrived at the location, which turned out to be Los Altos Hospital in Long Beach, a clerk confirmed she had insurance coverage.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The programs offered tender solace to the sad and sleepless. To the overwrought, the overweight, the drug-dependent and the spiritually confused, they extended a friendly hand. One program, run by charismatic Christians, claimed to "truly understand your pain," pledging in its advertisements to "love you, not judge you." Another was conceived by a former addict who had crashed to the bottom and climbed doggedly back. They all were part of a sprawling, sinister scam, a major insurer contends.
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