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Ben Hogan

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July 27, 1997 | RON SIRAK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Slowly the little man emerged from the valley, head bowed under his trademark white hat, battered 54-year-old legs carrying him up the hill toward the 18th green at Augusta National. As Ben Hogan, who died Friday at the age of 84, shuffled along, the thousands of fans crowded around the last green at the third round of the 1967 Masters picked up his tentative steps about 100 yards from the flag and carried him along with a thunderous ovation.
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SPORTS
June 16, 2013 | By Mark Wogenrich
ARDMORE, Pa. - Justin Rose received a text message last week telling him to "go out and be the man your dad taught you to be. " After he finished his round but before he had won the U.S. Open on Sunday at Merion Golf Club, Rose pointed skyward as a nod to his late father and coach, Ken. "The look up to the heavens was absolutely for my dad," Rose said. "Father's Day was not lost on me today. You don't have opportunities to really dedicate a win to someone you love. And today was about him. " Rose shot an even-par 70 Sunday, capping it with one of the loveliest pars he has ever made, to win the U.S. Open by two shots over Phil Mickelson and Jason Day. Rose, 32, finished one over par and became the first English player to win the U.S. Open in 43 years.
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SPORTS
June 11, 2013 | By Bill Dwyre
ARDMORE, Pa. -- Tiger Woods held his mandatory news conference Tuesday at noon, said his mandatory stuff and now we are ready to play the U.S. Open.  The event begins Thursday. It will be played at historic Merion Golf Club, a place that will test the willpower, shot-making and souls of all, including the spectators who will have to navigate through the rough and mud. Woods was asked about the history here, about how, or if, he hopes to fit into that legacy. Among other things, there are plaques commemorating Bobby Jones' final victory in his sweep of the grand slam of golf in 1930, with his U.S. Amateur title.
SPORTS
June 16, 2013 | By David Wharton and Chris Dufresne
Teeing off on the final hole at the U.S. Open, Justin Rose figured he needed par to seal a victory. The direction and trajectory of his shot looked good, but not until he walked up the fairway did Rose see that his ball had landed right beside a plaque commemorating the famous one-iron shot that Ben Hogan hit on the way to winning the U.S. Open in 1950. “When I came over the hill and saw my ball lying in the middle of the fairway … I thought, 'This is my moment,'" Rose recalled.
SPORTS
July 26, 1997
MOST GRAND SLAM VICTORIES Jack Nicklaus: 18 Walter Hagen: 11 Ben Hogan: 9 Gary Player: 8 Tom Watson: 8 Bobby Jones: 7 Arnold Palmer: 7 Gene Sarazen: 7 Sam Snead: 7 Harry Vardon: 7 Lee Trevino: 6 Nick Faldo: 6 Seve Ballesteros: 5 James Braid: 5 Byron Nelson: 5 J.H. Taylor: 5 Peter Thomson: 5 MOST CAREER VICTORIES Sam Snead: 81 Jack Nicklaus: 70 Ben Hogan: 63 Arnold Palmer: 60 Byron Nelson: 52 Billy Casper: 51 MOST CONSECUTIVE VICTORIES Byron Nelson (1945): 11 Ben Hogan (1948): 6 Jackie Burke Jr.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | JIM MURRAY
Ben Hogan was more than an athlete to me. Hogan was mythic. Hogan was my idol. "Charisma" doesn't begin to describe the hold Hogan had on our imaginations, on the golfing public's. We held Hogan, who died Friday at the age of 84, to a higher standard than we did the rest of the sports world. To us, he was like the cowboy hero of a thousand Saturday afternoon serials. He could do no wrong, could never let you down. The golf game is awash with Hogan stories.
SPORTS
February 4, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
The time was 1931, the place, Brookside Golf Club in Pasadena. Few people would have guessed they were looking at history when this skinny little youngster with the grim visage, hook swing and what was to become a trademark white cap took his stance on the first tee, teeth clenched, knuckles white. If someone had told them they were looking at the man who would become the most mythic figure in the annals of golf, they would have laughed. He was barely 5-feet-7, couldn't have weighed 125.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Herman Keiser, 89, who beat golfing legend Ben Hogan by a stroke to win the 1946 Masters tournament, died Wednesday of complications of Alzheimer's disease at an assisted living facility in suburban Akron, Ohio, his daughter, Diane Parker, announced Thursday. A native of Springfield, Mo., Keiser moved to northeast Ohio in 1940, becoming an assistant pro at Portage Country Club, and later was the head pro at Firestone Country Club in Akron.
SPORTS
June 19, 1988 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
Hogan! For years, the very name-- Hogan-- made strong men tremble. The men who pioneered tournament golf. Before and after World War II; before and after the 1949 auto accident that nearly killed him; before Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus--and after Bobby Jones--Texas' Ben Hogan was the most feared competitor in the game. They called him the Hawk. And they knew that even on their best days, the Hawk would probably get them anyhow. He once won the Masters, the U.S.
SPORTS
February 17, 1991 | FRED ROBLEDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A hush fell over the gallery ringing the 18th hole at Riviera Country Club. Sam Snead, never noted for his putting ability, was surveying a 12-foot birdie putt he needed to catch Ben Hogan and send the 1950 Los Angeles Open into an 18-hole playoff. As he was about to stroke the ball, there was the crack of a tree branch breaking from the weight of a man, who fell. Snead backed off while the gallery laughed. Hogan preferred not to watch.
SPORTS
June 11, 2013 | By Bill Dwyre
ARDMORE, Pa. -- Tiger Woods held his mandatory news conference Tuesday at noon, said his mandatory stuff and now we are ready to play the U.S. Open.  The event begins Thursday. It will be played at historic Merion Golf Club, a place that will test the willpower, shot-making and souls of all, including the spectators who will have to navigate through the rough and mud. Woods was asked about the history here, about how, or if, he hopes to fit into that legacy. Among other things, there are plaques commemorating Bobby Jones' final victory in his sweep of the grand slam of golf in 1930, with his U.S. Amateur title.
SPORTS
February 21, 2009 | Ellen Alperstein
Question: Many PGA Tour events move among different golf courses; why is this one settled in so firmly at the Riviera Country Club? Answer: .A few years ago a charitable foundation donated land for a course and a to-die-for clubhouse in Palm Desert to the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic for permanent use as host venue. Currently not among the pros' popular tournaments, the Hope, after a gale-force misadventure in 2007, returned the course to the foundation, but most of the top players were already gone with the wind -- in 2008 only three of the top 30 in the world entered.
SPORTS
June 6, 2008 | John Scheibe, Special to The Times
In a prelude to next week's U.S. Open at Torrey Pines, and also to Father's Day, HBO offers the worthwhile "Back Nine at Cherry Hills: The Legends of the 1960 U.S. Open." The hourlong documentary, which premieres Wednesday at 10 p.m.
SPORTS
February 14, 2007 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Nestled comfortably under a tree branch, beside a bed of flowers, is a new brass plaque embedded in stone just behind the fourth-tee box at Riviera Country Club. The inscription quotes Ben Hogan: "The greatest par 3 hole in America." There's not a drop of water to worry about, or a tree or a ditch either. It's simply 236 yards of straight-ahead trouble, if you can measure misery in yardage. Hogan would routinely hit a three-wood there, more if the wind was blowing in.
SPORTS
February 22, 2005
*--* YEAR WINNER 1926 Harry Cooper 1927 Bobby Cruickshank 1928 MacDonald Smith 1929 MacDonald Smith 1930 Denny Shute 1931 Ed Dudley 1932 MacDonald Smith 1933 Craig Wood 1934 MacDonald Smith 1935 Victor Ghezzi 1936 Jimmy Hines 1937 Harry Cooper 1938 Jimmy Thomson 1939 Jimmy Demaret 1940 Lawson Little 1941 Johnny Bulla 1942 Ben Hogan 1944 Harold McSpaden 1945 Sam Snead 1946 Byron Nelson 1947 Ben Hogan 1948 Ben Hogan 1949 Lloyd Mangrum 1950 Sam Snead 1951 Lloyd Mangrum 1952 Tommy Bolt 1953 Lloyd
MAGAZINE
April 18, 2004
I learned to play golf using a set of old Ben Hogan wood-headed clubs ("The Toink! Heard 'Round the World," by Martin J. Smith and Patrick J. Kiger, March 28). I thought the Big Berthas were appalling when they came out. Not only are they hideous monstrosities, but they take all the skill out of the game. There's no way you can miss when using those things. Give me a set of old-school wooden heads; they require skill. Jenn Fujikawa Redondo Beach
SPORTS
July 27, 1997 | BOB WILLIAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I knew Ben Hogan for 57 years. I met Ben in 1940. Hogan, Byron Nelson and Jimmy Thompson had to come to the Lakeside Golf Club in Toluca Lake to practice for the L.A. Open to be held at Hillcrest Country Club in January 1942. I was a publicist at Warner Brothers Studios in Burbank, which was across the street from Lakeside. My boss, Charles Einfeld, a golf nut, sent me over to Lakeside with some starlets to get some photos of them with any golf stars I could find.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Herman Keiser, 89, who beat golfing legend Ben Hogan by a stroke to win the 1946 Masters tournament, died Wednesday of complications of Alzheimer's disease at an assisted living facility in suburban Akron, Ohio, his daughter, Diane Parker, announced Thursday. A native of Springfield, Mo., Keiser moved to northeast Ohio in 1940, becoming an assistant pro at Portage Country Club, and later was the head pro at Firestone Country Club in Akron.
SPORTS
February 20, 2003
Past winners of Los Angeles Open, now sponsored by Nissan: LOS ANGELES OPEN *--* Year Winner Score Runner-up Score 1926 Harry Cooper 279 George Von Elm 282 1927 Bobby Cruickshank 282 Ed Dudley, Charles Guest 288 1928 Mac Smith 284 Harry Cooper 287 1929 Mac Smith 285 Tommy Armour 291 1930 Densmore Shute 296 Bobby Cruickshank, Horton Smith 300 1931 Ed Dudley 285 Al Espinosa, Eddie Loos 287 1932 Mac Smith 281 Leo Diegel, Olin Dutra, Joe 285 Kirkwood Sr.
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