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Ben Jonson

ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The father in A. R. Gurney's "The Cocktail Hour" frets about how he'll come off in the play (also named "The Cocktail Hour") that his son has written about him. With good reason. As played by Efrem Zimbalist Jr. at La Mirada Theatre, the character is a richly pompous windbag, as ripe for satire as someone out of Ben Jonson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In the nicest way, Amy Freed's sparkling new comedy "The Beard of Avon" is the "JFK" of its chosen milieu: Elizabethan England in the time of William Shakespeare. Freed answers her central question--"Who wrote Shakespeare's plays?"--by opening an overstuffed rucksack of conspiracy theories.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN DEMAC
The trick to doing a good play about a con man is that somehow the audience must be made to want his sting to work. That's not so hard in "The Rainmaker" and "The Music Man," where people are ultimately "conned" into hope and pride and feeling better about themselves. It's a tougher nut in "Sly Fox," a tale of greed outfoxing greed. Larry Gelbart's adaptation of Ben Jonson's "Volpone" was a great success in New York with George C.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Go home and die and stink." This stunning insult is merely a pebble in the sea of villainy that is Ben Jonson's black comedy "Volpone." In Glendale, A Noise Within presents the 1605 satire--one of the darkest views of human nature ever written--with sporadic splashes of spunk and style. A watchful chorus of vultures observes the play, squawking at some of the more appalling goings-on. But for all its colorful high concept, "Volpone" remains at heart a dutiful rendition of a classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Christopher Rouse's Requiem begins beyond emotion. For the first few minutes of the premiere of this extraordinary 90-minute score, Sunday night by the Los Angeles Master Chorale, baritone Sanford Sylvan stood alone on a darkened Walt Disney Concert Hall stage. Unaccompanied, he intoned a cheerless lyric by Irish poet Seamus Heaney. The song lies somewhere between chant and chantey. Sadness is presented as an offering, prayerful yet oddly matter-of-fact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | MARVIN PETAL, Marvin Petal lives in Oxnard
Oxnard is about to hire a sign consultant. As near as I can make out, this is a person who gives (actually sells) expert advice on the design and deployment of street signs. It occurs to me that if the city is about to invest in new street signage, this would be a propitious time to change the names of some of the streets in Oxnard's urban core. The identity of Oxnard's Original Sign Consultant (OSC) is, mercifully, obscured in history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | By Charles McNulty
Anne Barton, one of the 20th century's foremost Shakespeare scholars, died Monday in Cambridge, England. She was 80. Cambridge University, where she was an emeritus professor of English and fellow of Trinity College, announced her death but gave no other details. An American who studied at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, Barton spent most of her life on the native soil of her great subject, William Shakespeare. As an undergraduate, she published in Shakespeare Quarterly the essay "Love's Labour's Lost," the last paragraph of which contained, in her own words, "the germ" of what became her most important book, "Shakespeare and the Idea of the Play" (1962)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER, ROBERT KOEHLER,
You had to smile, learning that actor-playwright Gregory Mortensen had adapted Ben Jonson's Renaissance London comedy, "The Alchemist," into a Gold Rush-era San Francisco comedy called "The Scoundrel." Jonson, Shakespeare's chief rival, is rarely done anymore, and when he is, it's usually "Volpone." His comedy is caustic, mellowed only by a lilting verse style. It would be nice to hear actors deal with the original Jonson, but we'll take any updating with a title like "The Scoundrel."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1987
In 1623, seven years after William Shakespeare was buried in the parish church of Stratford-on-Avon, actors John Heminge and Henry Condell published a collection of his plays that came to be known as the First Folio. Their purpose, as they wrote in words that are significant to our story, was "only to keep the memory of so worthy a friend and fellow alive as was our Shakespeare . . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Grove Theatre Company in Garden Grove has unveiled sweeping plans to go professional and to consolidate its 12-month season into seven months--from June through December--with classical fare being offered at the indoor Gem Theatre and the outdoor Festival Amphitheatre.
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