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Ben Reznik

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November 24, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than a decade during the go-go '80s and early '90s, real estate developers with big problems and deep pockets flocked to the Ventura Boulevard law firm of Reznik & Reznik for advice that helped alter the commercial face of the San Fernando Valley. After all, Benjamin M. Reznik, the firm's intense, silver-haired co-founder, was not only the Valley's best-known land-use attorney, he also possessed formidable connections in politics and business.
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NEWS
November 24, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI and ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than a decade during the go-go '80s and early '90s, real estate developers with big problems and deep pockets flocked to the Ventura Boulevard law firm of Reznik & Reznik for advice that helped alter the commercial face of the San Fernando Valley. After all, Benjamin M. Reznik, the firm's intense, silver-haired co-founder, was not only the Valley's best-known land-use attorney, he also possessed formidable connections in politics and business.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1993 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was war in City Hall. And, once again, attorney Ben Reznik maneuvered for the kill. His client wanted to build 172 apartments in Encino, not far from Reznik's own home. The neighbors were aghast. And they had Councilman Marvin Braude on their side. Reznik decided to go nuclear. He advised his client to throw in some subsidized housing, gauging correctly that it would make the plan more attractive to the city Planning Commission and even more frightful to the neighbors. Facing defeat, "they cut a deal with us," he said: 150 units with no subsidized housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1993 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was war in City Hall. And, once again, attorney Ben Reznik maneuvered for the kill. His client wanted to build 172 apartments in Encino, not far from Reznik's own home. The neighbors were aghast. And they had Councilman Marvin Braude on their side. Reznik decided to go nuclear. He advised his client to throw in some subsidized housing, gauging correctly that it would make the plan more attractive to the city Planning Commission and even more frightful to the neighbors. Facing defeat, "they cut a deal with us," he said: 150 units with no subsidized housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday approved a zone change to permit construction of a 45-unit apartment project east of Cal State Northridge on the site of the Newman Center, owned by the campus's Catholic organization. Ben Reznik, the attorney representing the center's zoning application, said the center needed the zoning change because it intends to sell the property to a developer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY
Despite warnings that it is inviting a lawsuit, the Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to reject a proposal that would allow the construction of six luxury homes at the northern end of Hazelbrook Road. Buttressed by opposition from the Studio City Residents' Assn., Councilman Joel Wachs argued that the hilly property is too steep to accommodate more than two or three houses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1990
An attorney for a developer trying to build homes in Studio City's Fryman Canyon charged Tuesday that a lawsuit filed by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy is an attempt to depress the property's value. Attorney Ben Reznik, who represents developer Fred Sahadi, said the state agency is trying to drive down the price of the canyon property so it can buy it. For several months, the two parties have talked, but sharply disagreed over price. The conservancy says the canyon is worth $8.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Board of Building and Safety Commissioners voted Tuesday to support a sanction imposed on a builder who demolished the last 19th century home on Bunker Hill without a permit. In response to the April leveling of the Giese house by G.H. Palmer Associates, city officials invoked the so-called scorched-earth ordinance to halt for five years construction on the site at West Cesar Chavez Avenue and Figueroa Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The City Council denied a permit Wednesday to an El Sereno developer who sought to build roads and storm drains for a planned subdivision on Elephant Hill, a 110-acre site billed as the last significant open space in northeast Los Angeles. The council's vote reversed a decision by the Board of Public Works approving the permits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1993 | SCOTT GLOVER
Valley Industry and Commerce Assn. Chairman Ben Reznik said there is no question what Los Angeles' new mayor will mean to business in the San Fernando Valley. "We've got a friend in Dick Riordan," said the leader of the 300-member nonpartisan booster group. "We're glad he's mayor." The pro-business Riordan gained the support of VICA during the campaign with such ideas as privatizing city garbage collection and leasing Los Angeles International Airport to generate more revenue for the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2000
The Los Angeles Board of Education voted Tuesday to increase the fees charged on new housing construction by about 70% and to slightly increase fees on commercial developments. The hikes were authorized by a change in the Education Code approved by the state's voters as part of the 1998 school construction bond. District officials estimated that the changes will generate $12.3 million in fees this year, for a total to $34.6 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
Actress Carmen Zapata is among the participants today in the third annual "Gender Equity in Education" presentation at Cal State Northridge. Zapata, whose movie credits include "Sister Act" and "Sister Act II," will narrate a play by the campus theater group Teatro Sin Fronteras illustrating the impact of gender inequity in high school and university classrooms, said Cheryl Atienza, development assistant for the presentation.
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