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Ben S Bernanke

OPINION
November 25, 2010
Fed up with the Fed Re "Bernanke bashers," Opinion, Nov. 19 I almost fell out of my chair when I read that Rep. Ron Paul is portraying the Federal Reserve and its chairman, Ben S. Bernanke, as socialists. Wait, what? Is this the same Bernanke who is an admirer of Alan Greenspan and Milton Friedman, champions of deregulation? Is this the same Fed that has been shirking its regulatory duties for the past 30 years, and has led us to more economic inequality than this country has seen in almost 100 years?
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OPINION
January 27, 2010
Not very gentle on Ben Re " Federal Reserve chief's job on the line," Jan. 23 It is a telling commentary on our fractious politics when populists from the left and right unite to protest Ben S. Bernanke's reappointment as Fed chairman. Wall Street Brahmins and Washington lackeys attempt to continue the charade that only a chosen few can manage the American economy. But the case against the chairman's reappointment is overwhelming. He and his predecessor, Alan Greenspan, protected the banking system and their club of cronies to the detriment of the general population.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2011 | By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
The buildup seeming to rival that of the British royal wedding. A cable news channel displayed for hours a digital clock counting down to the event. Pundits breathed deeply about the potential impact of it all. The marble temple-like edifice that houses the nearly century-old Federal Reserve had never seen anything like it: For the first time, a chairman of the central bank was submitting himself to questioning by reporters at an news conference. At the appointed time, the chairman, Ben S. Bernanke, took his seat behind a mahogany desk made specially for the occasion.
OPINION
January 7, 2010
It's tall, sure, but so what? Re "Architecture to look up to," Editorial, Jan. 5 I am always pleased when architecture gains a place of prominence in the newspaper, particularly on the editorial page. However, to be "in awe" of the Burj Khalifa -- a monument to ego, power and (as Times critic Christopher Hawthorne aptly stated) hubris -- is misplaced. The architectural and engineering achievements to be in awe of are schools, homes, hospitals, offices and public spaces, not necessarily by the stars of the industry but designed with care, responsibility, insight and creativity by a dedicated architectural workforce.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2007 | Maura Reynolds and Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writers
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke failed Thursday either to calm pessimists' fears or to raise optimists' hopes about the economy -- leading to the second straight day of losses on Wall Street. In lengthy congressional testimony, Bernanke tried to deliver a balanced message. On the downside, he said, the Fed believes that the economy will slow significantly by the end of the year and that problems in the housing market have yet to bottom out.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2007 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to calm turbulence in the financial markets, President Bush and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke took separate steps Friday to ease the credit crunch that has socked investors and dried up access to home loans for millions of Americans. In their remarks the two leaders displayed a painful recognition that the credit crisis -- triggered by a wave of defaults on sub-prime mortgages -- had ballooned beyond anything they had anticipated.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The stock market closed out another erratic week with a big gain Friday after investors took comments from President Bush and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke as signs that Wall Street wouldn't be left to deal with problems in the mortgage and credit markets on its own. Investors balked early in Friday's session when Bernanke didn't suggest that a cut in the benchmark federal funds rate was imminent.
OPINION
November 5, 2010
The Federal Reserve announced that it will try again to spur the economy through a second round of "quantitative easing," which is Washington-speak for "conjuring money out of thin air. " But the Fed's plan to purchase $600 billion worth of long-term Treasury bonds won't double the country's sluggish growth rate or slash unemployment. It's just a nudge to the economy, not a shove. The problem for the Fed is that it is failing at one of its core missions ? to keep unemployment low ?
BUSINESS
March 1, 2011 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said a sustained rise in prices for oil and other commodities would threaten the economic recovery, but that even with the turmoil in the Middle East he did not expect higher prices would create inflation problems in the United States. "The most likely outcome is that the recent rise in commodity prices will lead to, at most, a temporary and relatively modest increase in U.S. consumer price inflation," Bernanke said in testimony Tuesday before the Senate Banking Committee.
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