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Ben Silverman

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BUSINESS
July 28, 2009 | Meg James
One of Hollywood's juiciest television dramas came to a close Monday when NBC Entertainment chief Ben Silverman said he was leaving the network after two tumultuous years. In the end, NBC Universal Chief Executive Jeff Zucker's big gamble to hand over the keys to NBC's storied legacy to an aggressive young television producer who vowed to revolutionize the network backfired.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
The ultra-tan crew of "Jersey Shore" is already fist-pumping, Ben Flajnik has, by now, gotten back in the reality dating game as the newest "Bachelor. " And celebrities have been switching spouses on "Celebrity Wife Swap. " But if your DVR has not yet reached its reality show limit, here's a look at some new reality offerings networks are rolling out later in the season. Shipping Wars: A&E has already made us wish we had the patience to make a life out of scouring repossessed storage units for riches.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 2007 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
The first television show that Ben Silverman bought this summer after being named co-chairman of NBC Entertainment was "Sin Tetas No Hay Paraiso." Translation: "Without Breasts There Is No Paradise." The popular Colombian telenovela is a story of a destitute young woman who sees bigger breasts as her salvation but after her augmentation becomes a prostitute involved with a drug dealer. Silverman is on a mission to "bring sexy back" to the downtrodden peacock network.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Marc Graboff, president of NBC's West Coast business operations and the TV network's longtime consigliere , is leaving the company. His departure will continue a dramatic makeover of NBC Entertainment's executive ranks since Comcast Corp. assumed control of media giant NBCUniversal in January. A few years ago Graboff was the top business executive running the NBC network, but in recent years his role had been diminished, particularly after the arrival of Comcast. Graboff, who had nearly two years remaining on his contract, is planning to join a new venture outside of broadcast television, according to NBC and two people familiar with his plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
It's hardly a shocker to read the news that Ben Silverman is finally -- after a year of breathless speculation -- out at NBC, having announced that he is leaving his post as network entertainment chief to form a new venture with Barry Diller, a longtime Silverman mentor and perhaps the oldest living new-media mogul on the planet.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2007 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
In 1985, when Ben Silverman was in junior high, he told his mom he needed to stay home from school to watch TV. "He said, 'Brandon Tartikoff's mother let him stay home from school,' " Mary Silverman recalled in an interview Tuesday, referring to the legendary NBC entertainment president. "From the age of 10, Ben always wanted to be the head of NBC."
BUSINESS
September 17, 2008 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Ben Silverman, NBC's chief programmer, has described himself as a "next generation, rock star" television executive. Last weekend he was in New York: dining with actress Brooke Shields, popping up on the set of the season premiere of "Saturday Night Live" and hobnobbing with advertisers at an NFL game. Silverman spent much of August abroad, attending the Olympics in Beijing, meeting with foreign TV executives and then celebrating his 38th birthday in Europe with Sting, Billy Joel and the head of Britain's Conservative Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2007
PREDICTION: NBC's new co-chairman of NBC Entertainment, Ben Silverman, will fail within two years or less ["The Future Face of NBC," by Scott Collins, June 2]. Hollywood just doesn't get it: It is the quality of story, not advertising and product placement. As consumers, we are put off by constant advertising shrouded with idiotic stories. Produce a good, purposeful program and the public will watch. GARDNER BARKER San Marino
BUSINESS
November 19, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Marc Graboff, president of NBC's West Coast business operations and the TV network's longtime consigliere , is leaving the company. His departure will continue a dramatic makeover of NBC Entertainment's executive ranks since Comcast Corp. assumed control of media giant NBCUniversal in January. A few years ago Graboff was the top business executive running the NBC network, but in recent years his role had been diminished, particularly after the arrival of Comcast. Graboff, who had nearly two years remaining on his contract, is planning to join a new venture outside of broadcast television, according to NBC and two people familiar with his plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
The ultra-tan crew of "Jersey Shore" is already fist-pumping, Ben Flajnik has, by now, gotten back in the reality dating game as the newest "Bachelor. " And celebrities have been switching spouses on "Celebrity Wife Swap. " But if your DVR has not yet reached its reality show limit, here's a look at some new reality offerings networks are rolling out later in the season. Shipping Wars: A&E has already made us wish we had the patience to make a life out of scouring repossessed storage units for riches.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
When Jordan Hoffner left YouTube last fall, the former head of content partnerships had just begun forging deals with Hollywood studios to provide television and movie clips to the Internet video giant. The former NBC digital media executive's wrangling with Time Warner Inc., the Walt Disney Co. and Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., among others, took years to conclude because of concerns over cannibalizing existing business relationships and questions about whether the videos would reach the desired audience.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2009 | Meg James
One of Hollywood's juiciest television dramas came to a close Monday when NBC Entertainment chief Ben Silverman said he was leaving the network after two tumultuous years. In the end, NBC Universal Chief Executive Jeff Zucker's big gamble to hand over the keys to NBC's storied legacy to an aggressive young television producer who vowed to revolutionize the network backfired.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
It's hardly a shocker to read the news that Ben Silverman is finally -- after a year of breathless speculation -- out at NBC, having announced that he is leaving his post as network entertainment chief to form a new venture with Barry Diller, a longtime Silverman mentor and perhaps the oldest living new-media mogul on the planet.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2009 | Joe Flint
Barry Diller, who warned last week at a media industry conference that the transition from old media to new media would be "bloody," is turning to Ben Silverman for help with triage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2008 | SCOTT COLLINS
This past summer, NBC Universal executive Ben Silverman raised eyebrows when he told the New York Post that the company was now much more concerned with profit than with the size of its audience. "We're managing for margins and not for ratings," Silverman was quoted as saying. It's easy to laugh off Silverman's quote as a self-serving excuse. Like every other TV reporter, I sat through countless presentations earlier in this decade, when Silverman's current boss, NBC Universal chief Jeff Zucker, plumped the network for the ad industry by noting that its programming was No. 1 at all times of the day in the most-important demographics.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2008 | Meg James, James is a Times staff writer.
If Ben Silverman is getting ready to leave the peacock flock, neither he nor NBC is acting like it. In fact, the signals suggest he's not about to fly the coop. On Thursday, NBC parent company General Electric Co. added Silverman to the board of the Peacock Equity Fund, a $250-million media investment vehicle owned by NBC Universal and GE Commercial Finance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2007 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
The two new faces atop NBC took center stage at the annual summer television press tour Monday -- but one of the first questions was about an old face. Ben Silverman and Marc Graboff, new co-chairmen of NBC Entertainment and Universal Media Studios, were brought aboard after former NBC Entertainment President Kevin Reilly was ousted in late May. "I only arrived -- all I can say is we're really excited about what we're doing today," Silverman said about the departure.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2008 | SCOTT COLLINS
This past summer, NBC Universal executive Ben Silverman raised eyebrows when he told the New York Post that the company was now much more concerned with profit than with the size of its audience. "We're managing for margins and not for ratings," Silverman was quoted as saying. It's easy to laugh off Silverman's quote as a self-serving excuse. Like every other TV reporter, I sat through countless presentations earlier in this decade, when Silverman's current boss, NBC Universal chief Jeff Zucker, plumped the network for the ad industry by noting that its programming was No. 1 at all times of the day in the most-important demographics.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2008 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Ben Silverman, NBC's chief programmer, has described himself as a "next generation, rock star" television executive. Last weekend he was in New York: dining with actress Brooke Shields, popping up on the set of the season premiere of "Saturday Night Live" and hobnobbing with advertisers at an NFL game. Silverman spent much of August abroad, attending the Olympics in Beijing, meeting with foreign TV executives and then celebrating his 38th birthday in Europe with Sting, Billy Joel and the head of Britain's Conservative Party.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2007 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
NBC Universal hired Ben Silverman in June to reverse the fading fortunes of its broadcast network. But the biggest winner so far seems to be the 37-year-old TV producer and the production company, Reveille, he is poised to sell for more than $100 million. Since Silverman became co-chairman of NBC Entertainment, in charge of picking the network's shows, Reveille has become a leading source of programming for NBC.
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