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Benetton

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BUSINESS
July 14, 1987
Italy's largest clothing concern and a successful international retailer said it will offer insurance, securities underwriting, personalized portfolio management and other financial services through a newly formed company called In-Holding. The new firm will be capitalized with about $75 million. Benetton, headquartered in Milan, is already active in the insurance sector, where it has a 37% stake in the British insurance group Prudential.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2014 | By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz
Between the bouncy music and the stacks of colorful jeans, visitors to the Benetton store on Chicago's Michigan Avenue might catch a whiff of a growing marketing trend. Mounted high in the corner beside the store entrance, a scent diffuser, installed in November, spreads a bright spring fragrance modeled after Benetton's Verde cologne. "It finishes the emotion we are trying to create in the store," said Robert Argueta, director of visual merchandising for the United Colors of Benetton, who also is testing the scent in Benetton's New York flagship store.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 1992
I spent an hour and a half in Benetton's store in the Topanga mall yesterday. The clothes were beautiful, the sales assistance superb. I spent $256.55 (receipt enclosed). I just read the L.A. Times article about their appalling new ad campaign, using dying children to promote their product. I am ashamed to support a company that demonstrates such bad taste. I am returning the clothes to the store. If the intention was AIDS awareness, why didn't Benetton give the AIDS Foundation the money it spent on print ads in Vogue and Vanity Fair?
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - A clothing factory in an emerging country collapses or catches fire with horrific loss of life. Famous Western brands are found in the wreckage. An investigation reveals substandard practices in the local and global clothing trade. There was a distinct feeling of deja vu Thursday as rescuers worked desperately through the night at the site of a collapsed building in Bangladesh, crafting makeshift escape chutes from bolts of fabric. The hand-wringing, finger-pointing and promises of reform started hours after the nine-story Rana Plaza building pancaked Wednesday morning just outside the nation's capital, Dhaka, killing at least 238 people, most of them apparel workers, and injuring more than 1,000.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1992
I'd like to applaud Benetton for the excellent decision to pull its "Burning Car" billboards in the wake of the Los Angeles riots ("Marketers Rethinking Violent Ads," May 14). It shows that someone in a corporate boardroom is paying attention. Good move. Even though I found the ad somewhat off the mark, I have always been fond of the company's bold, multicultural advertising. The vision in their ad campaign is light-years ahead of the whites-only, June Cleaver-style, ultra-suburban-crap advertising that we have to put up with daily on television and in print.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2014 | By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz
Between the bouncy music and the stacks of colorful jeans, visitors to the Benetton store on Chicago's Michigan Avenue might catch a whiff of a growing marketing trend. Mounted high in the corner beside the store entrance, a scent diffuser, installed in November, spreads a bright spring fragrance modeled after Benetton's Verde cologne. "It finishes the emotion we are trying to create in the store," said Robert Argueta, director of visual merchandising for the United Colors of Benetton, who also is testing the scent in Benetton's New York flagship store.
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI - A clothing factory in an emerging country collapses or catches fire with horrific loss of life. Famous Western brands are found in the wreckage. An investigation reveals substandard practices in the local and global clothing trade. There was a distinct feeling of deja vu Thursday as rescuers worked desperately through the night at the site of a collapsed building in Bangladesh, crafting makeshift escape chutes from bolts of fabric. The hand-wringing, finger-pointing and promises of reform started hours after the nine-story Rana Plaza building pancaked Wednesday morning just outside the nation's capital, Dhaka, killing at least 238 people, most of them apparel workers, and injuring more than 1,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
When Jeffrey Becom packs his bags, he plans to stay awhile. Patiently wandering the streets of towns with names as exotic as Gallipoli and Corfu, the Berkeley-based artist looks for stylish images to trap forever with his camera. Oh, he probably wouldn't describe his work that way, but his Cibachrome photographs on view at Susan Spiritus Gallery reveal a built-in radar for doorways and walls that happen to have the bright, cheerful, semiabstract look of slick advertisements.
NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Compiled by the Fashion87 staff
For her band's new video, "Seven Wonders," Fleetwood Mac's Christine McVie needed something to wear. So she called Margi Kent in her Melrose Avenue studio and ordered up an outfit. Kent styled a show-stopper top in beaded black and a pair of velvet pants. It was one of three outfits Kent made for Ms. Mac, Listen hears from Sharon Weisz of the band's office. It was part of a busy week. After McVie, Anita Baker went to see Kent, desperately seeking something to wear for a TV appearance.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Flip through most store or mail order catalogues, glance at the models and one fact becomes crystal clear: fashion ads don't always imitate life. Not everyone in the real world is perfectly proportioned, toned, and graced with a pretty face. But lately, some retailers are redirecting their advertising methods to include models who are physically challenged individuals, to better reflect their customer base.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
United Colors of Benetton has a habit of launching controversial ads. Remember the campaign last year showing world leaders such as President Obama and the pope lip-locked with each other? This time, the clothing brand is focusing on the unemployed - specifically those younger than 30. Its newest ad campaign will feature portraits of suit-clad young people without jobs who also aren't in school or training. The company is also launching a competition dubbed “Unemployee of the Year,” inviting unemployed applicants ages 18 to 30 to submit proposals for projects to cause “concrete social impact in their community.” The hope?
BUSINESS
May 6, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Benetton Group, Italy's largest clothing maker, said it had reached an agreement with Mattel Inc. to make apparel for girls under the Barbie brand. The new line will be called Barbie Loves Benetton and will be in stores by September, the Treviso, Italy-based company said. The agreement with El Segundo-based Mattel, the world's largest toy maker, runs through 2006.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Pirelli and the Benetton family agreed to buy 23% of Olivetti for $6 billion to become the main investors in the company that runs Telecom Italia, Italy's dominant phone company. The stake is being sold by a holding company owned by Telecom Italia Chief Executive Roberto Colaninno and his partners. Olivetti said Colaninno quit as chief executive of Olivetti and Telecom Italia.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
After 18 years, Benetton has severed ties with Oliviero Toscani, the Italian creative director whose controversial advertisements have featured AIDS patients, mating horses and, most recently, death-row inmates. "Fortunately, nothing lasts forever!" said Toscani in a statement issued by Benetton. "It's good to have the courage to end something that has been fantastic and still have the enthusiasm to take on new projects."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2000
Re "Benetton Sued Over Death Row Visits," Feb. 24: I wonder if the reaction to the Benetton photo essay is an American embarrassment in the face of the soon-to-be dead. THOMAS B. ARGE Palmdale
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pudgy or gaunt, with stubble, with biceps, the death row inmates posed for photos in their prison scrubs. Then they talked: about their moms, bass fishing, pizza. About how they fear execution. The photos and interviews filled a magazine--a 96-page plea for compassion. An attempt to show that the killers our courts condemn to death are people just like us. The magazine's producers call it social commentary. But is it crass commercialism as well? Missouri's attorney general thinks so.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2000
Re "Benetton Sued Over Death Row Visits," Feb. 24: I wonder if the reaction to the Benetton photo essay is an American embarrassment in the face of the soon-to-be dead. THOMAS B. ARGE Palmdale
BUSINESS
February 17, 2000 | Associated Press
Sears, Roebuck & Co. terminated its contract with trendy clothing company Benetton under pressure from victims' rights groups who objected to the Italian company's ad campaign featuring death row inmates. Sears Chief Executive Arthur Martinez was outraged, as were many customers, at the ads, company spokesman Tom Nicholson said. The retailer ended its contract after Benetton agreed to allow Sears to preview future ads.
BOOKS
February 13, 2000 | DAVID RIEFF, David Rieff is the author of several books, including "Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West," and is co-editor of "Crimes of War: What the Public Should Know."
Like gun control and abortion, the death penalty is one of those peculiar American institutions that make citizens of the other developed countries shake their heads with wonder. Capital punishment has been abolished throughout the developed world, and it is now inconceivable that it could ever be reinstated in the countries of the European Union.
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