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Benign Neglect

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | HALFORD H. FAIRCHILD, Halford H. Fairchild, a social psychologist, is a co-author of "Prejudice and Discrimination: An Annotated Bibliography" (Westerfield Enterprises). He lives and writes in South-Central Los Angeles.
"Pluralistic ignorance" is social-science jargon for the phenomenon where masses of people--the majority--readily subscribe to a false idea or belief. Such is the case in the near-hysteria surrounding the second trial of the LAPD officers accused of beating and denying the civil rights of Rodney G. King. Pluralistic ignorance is displayed in the widespread fears of another conflagration of our city.
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NEWS
February 15, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a major embarrassment, one that's still talked about in Hollywood today, almost a quarter-century later. The story began in October 1977, when David Begelman was ousted as president of the motion picture division of Columbia Pictures after he had forged tens of thousands of dollars worth of checks, many of them originally made out to actor Cliff Robertson.
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NEWS
October 20, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months later, the ramifications of the Los Angeles riots continues to trouble a group of family therapists. But while anguishing over the unrest in Los Angeles, a panel at the annual conference of the American Assn. of Family Therapists seemed just as concerned by the implications for their profession. With its tradition of catering to a primarily white, middle-class clientele, family therapy is struggling with issues of diversity.
NEWS
October 8, 1998 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Challenging the main reason people go to chiropractors, a major medical journal today is releasing a study showing that spinal manipulation eases back pain no better than specialized physical therapy and only a bit better than doing next to nothing. The study--led by University of Washington researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine--goes against the growing acceptance of chiropractic spinal manipulation as a treatment for acute low back pain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1989
So William Allen of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission believes that protection of minority rights causes social divisiveness. Well, I suppose so. As long as minorities "knew their place" and did not raise their voices in protest, things looked peaceful--never mind the injustice. We might even give Allen the benefit of the doubt and say he is advocating the theory of "benign neglect." Under this theory minorities quietly work out their own problems without undue attention from the mainstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1987
I found Christopher Matthews' article "Simon's Surge Reveals Depth of Democrats' Death Wish" (Op-Ed Page, Nov. 29) most interesting. I suppose he is right, but then again, perhaps he is not. Perhaps the people have finally tired of Reagan's benign neglect. Benign neglect of the unemployed, the unemployed, the poor, the homeless, the sick and the elderly, not to mention the national debt or the trade deficit. Perhaps, maybe, the people have even grown tired of Reagan's fatal attraction with that already overfed and gorged seductress, the military-industrial complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1989
Those of us who remember George Bush touring Boston Harbor with so much fanfare last year during the campaign are, to some extent, disappointed in the lack of enthusiasm on his part to personally survey the results of a failed environmental policy, which now fouls the waters of Prince William Sound. Nobody can deny that the environment is one area that suffers the most from the Administration's laissez-faire attitude and that we cannot depend on large corporations to police themselves in the exploitation of our natural resources, to protect the air, water and the land that belongs to us all. We cannot afford any more oil spills or an Administration that abdicates its responsibility to protect the environment under siege by corporate plunderers.
NEWS
April 28, 1985
As a Jewish family whose children married outside their religion, we compliment Beth Ann Krier on a well-researched exploration of a difficult subject ("Intermarriage a Threat to Jewish Way of Life?" April 19). The Jewish establishment laments and deplores the high incidence of intermarriage--but no one asks the critical question: Why? Yet the villain is so easy to identify. When anti-Semitism flourishes, intermarriage ceases to be a problem. When anti-Semitism declines, intermarriage thrives.
NEWS
December 14, 1989
All the hoopla, euphoria and jubilation greeting the sudden collapse of communist rule in Eastern Europe and its close call in the Soviet Union cannot mask the impotence of the other superpower, the United States, as well. It is no exaggeration to state that we are unable, nay, unwilling, to undertake the immense task to right our near-bankrupt political-economic system, which is shot through with mismanagement, greed and corruption. The problems of the Soviet Union have been drummed into our ears ad nauseam, but the shambles of our situation is swept under the rug by benign neglect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1992
The editorial "Bad Medicine for a Serious Ailment" (Oct. 23) provides the public with a grossly distorted view of the California Medical Assn.'s "Basic Health Care Coverage Initiative," Proposition 166, on the November ballot. The editorial offers no meaningful alternative for health-care reform and accuses the CMA of promising more than it can deliver. This is blatantly untrue. Furthermore, the serious ailment lies with those who propose nothing in response to the enormous health-care crisis in our state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998 | MANSOOR IJAZ
Pakistan's announcement this week that it test-fired a missile capable of carrying nuclear payloads deep into India escalates the stakes dramatically in the region's nuclear chess match. At the same time, India's recently elected Hindu nationalist government has provocatively stated its intention to conduct a new round of test explosions on nuclear warhead designs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | HALFORD H. FAIRCHILD, Halford H. Fairchild, a social psychologist, is a co-author of "Prejudice and Discrimination: An Annotated Bibliography" (Westerfield Enterprises). He lives and writes in South-Central Los Angeles.
"Pluralistic ignorance" is social-science jargon for the phenomenon where masses of people--the majority--readily subscribe to a false idea or belief. Such is the case in the near-hysteria surrounding the second trial of the LAPD officers accused of beating and denying the civil rights of Rodney G. King. Pluralistic ignorance is displayed in the widespread fears of another conflagration of our city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1992
The editorial "Bad Medicine for a Serious Ailment" (Oct. 23) provides the public with a grossly distorted view of the California Medical Assn.'s "Basic Health Care Coverage Initiative," Proposition 166, on the November ballot. The editorial offers no meaningful alternative for health-care reform and accuses the CMA of promising more than it can deliver. This is blatantly untrue. Furthermore, the serious ailment lies with those who propose nothing in response to the enormous health-care crisis in our state.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months later, the ramifications of the Los Angeles riots continues to trouble a group of family therapists. But while anguishing over the unrest in Los Angeles, a panel at the annual conference of the American Assn. of Family Therapists seemed just as concerned by the implications for their profession. With its tradition of catering to a primarily white, middle-class clientele, family therapy is struggling with issues of diversity.
SPORTS
June 19, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eager to make amends for the one game that separated them from first place last fall, the confident Dodgers began the season anticipating their first midsummer showdown series. It is finally here. But the series, beginning today, is against the Houston Astros. And the showdown is for last place. The one game has become 11 1/2, their infield has become toxic, their clubhouse has grown tense, their season has turned desperate. "It's like a bad dream," Fred Claire said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1990 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coming home to the barrio after 26 years, Ofelia Escobedo beheld a sight that seemed to defy the laws of time. There, as if by some astonishing act of suspension, the rickety little houses and worn streets of Carlsbad's Latino quarter appeared virtually unchanged since Escobedo had first seen them in 1943. Many people she knew long ago still lived there, older but still proud. As always, the laundry fluttered from clothes lines in the ocean breeze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE
With the world spotlight on the Olympic Games here in 1984, politicians and dignitaries applauded a $600,000 face lift for Pershing Square, the venerable greensward named after World War I hero Gen. John J. (Black Jack) Pershing. On a sunny July day that year, thousands of bright balloons wafted skyward, and a 120-piece Olympic band played.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1990 | RAY TESSLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coming home to the barrio after 26 years, Ofelia Escobedo beheld a sight that seemed to defy the laws of time. There, as if by some astonishing act of suspension, the rickety little houses and worn streets of Carlsbad's Latino quarter appeared virtually unchanged since Escobedo had first seen them in 1943. Many people she knew long ago still lived there, older but still proud. As always, the laundry fluttered from clothes lines in the ocean breeze.
NEWS
December 14, 1989
All the hoopla, euphoria and jubilation greeting the sudden collapse of communist rule in Eastern Europe and its close call in the Soviet Union cannot mask the impotence of the other superpower, the United States, as well. It is no exaggeration to state that we are unable, nay, unwilling, to undertake the immense task to right our near-bankrupt political-economic system, which is shot through with mismanagement, greed and corruption. The problems of the Soviet Union have been drummed into our ears ad nauseam, but the shambles of our situation is swept under the rug by benign neglect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1989
So William Allen of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission believes that protection of minority rights causes social divisiveness. Well, I suppose so. As long as minorities "knew their place" and did not raise their voices in protest, things looked peaceful--never mind the injustice. We might even give Allen the benefit of the doubt and say he is advocating the theory of "benign neglect." Under this theory minorities quietly work out their own problems without undue attention from the mainstream.
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