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Bennett Raley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2002 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Bennett Raley, a slow-talking Coloradan in cowboy boots, has his hands on the faucet that sends water from the Colorado River to Southern California. He seems ready and willing to shut it off, which is scaring the cities and infuriating the farms that are competing for the precious resource.
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NATIONAL
December 2, 2004 | Bettina Boxall and Tony Perry, Times Staff Writers
Bennett Raley, architect of the Bush administration's Western water policies for the last three years, announced Wednesday he was leaving his job as assistant secretary of the Interior for water and science. Raley oversaw federal policy during a particularly challenging time, when the demands of a fast-growing region collided with drought.
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NATIONAL
December 2, 2004 | Bettina Boxall and Tony Perry, Times Staff Writers
Bennett Raley, architect of the Bush administration's Western water policies for the last three years, announced Wednesday he was leaving his job as assistant secretary of the Interior for water and science. Raley oversaw federal policy during a particularly challenging time, when the demands of a fast-growing region collided with drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2002 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Bennett Raley, a slow-talking Coloradan in cowboy boots, has his hands on the faucet that sends water from the Colorado River to Southern California. He seems ready and willing to shut it off, which is scaring the cities and infuriating the farms that are competing for the precious resource.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
A complex deal that would restore Southern California's right to use surplus Colorado River water received preliminary approval Friday from a key federal official. Bennett Raley, an assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of the Interior, told the four agencies trying to hammer out the agreement that they were on the right track but still needed to find a way to save the Salton Sea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2004 | Tony Perry and Jason Felch, Times Staff Writers
Ronald Gastelum announced Tuesday that he plans to retire as president and chief executive of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California after five years of guiding the agency through controversy, cutbacks and an ambitious search for water to accommodate the region's growing needs. Gastelum, 58, said he would leave his $297,000 a year post Dec. 31. He said he had no specific plans for the future. "It's been a good run, and now it's time to move on," Gastelum said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- Ushering in what could be another long, hot summer of wrangling over the Klamath water crisis, 100 members of the Yurok tribe protested here Thursday what they consider the Bush administration's embrace of farmers at the expense of endangered fish. The impoverished tribe, which depends on salmon from the Klamath River in Northern California, marched with placards outside a hotel where a packed crowd of Western water managers met to discuss a new federal plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2002 | Steve Lopez
Remember those annoying days of water rationing 10 years ago? We might see a return in the near future, thanks to drought, water feuds and the fact that President Bush has no love for California. The penalty for an Al Gore vote in 2000 could be that your front lawn dies in 2003. "It could be worse than it was in the early 1990s," says Gerry Zimmerman of the Colorado River Board of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2002 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
With a federal cutback in California's water supply just days away, 22 members of Congress from the state sent a blunt letter Thursday demanding that the Bush administration do more to solve the problem at the heart of the crisis: the failing health of the Salton Sea.
OPINION
August 8, 2002
The Colorado River is running at a relative trickle this drought year. Once-foaming white rapids in some sections are dribbles. The Rocky Mountain snowpack that recreates the river every year was scant last spring. Colorado and other states are understandably stepping up pressure on California to begin cutting back its excessive use of the river's water. California has less than five months to put its water thrift plan in place or face a dramatic cutback by the Department of the Interior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Officials of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, the regional agency that supplies water to 17 million people in six counties, said Friday that the district could avoid shortages, even if new predictions of continued drought along the Colorado River proved accurate. "We believe we can more than manage the circumstances" if drought forces an end to "surplus" allocations from the river, said MWD Vice President Adan Ortega.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2002 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The attorney for the Imperial Irrigation District said Monday night that incremental progress is being made in breaking the deadlock over a proposed water deal between the district and coastal Southern California. But Imperial board members responded with anger at the federal government and deep distrust of other California water agencies involved in the proposed deal.
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