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Benny Hinn

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MAGAZINE
August 24, 2003
The constitutional guarantees of freedom of speech and religion unfortunately are abused by all kinds of fanatics and Elmer Gantrys who believe that it is more blessed to give than receive, provided they are the recipients ("The Price of Healing," by William Lobdell, July 27). Surrounded by opulence, the ranks of televangelists such as Benny Hinn have swollen to thousands--a veritable herd of "holy" cows who command unmerited reverence from the followers they are fleecing. Cuthbert Mann Glendora Some of Hinn's good friends are my close friends.
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MAGAZINE
August 24, 2003
The constitutional guarantees of freedom of speech and religion unfortunately are abused by all kinds of fanatics and Elmer Gantrys who believe that it is more blessed to give than receive, provided they are the recipients ("The Price of Healing," by William Lobdell, July 27). Surrounded by opulence, the ranks of televangelists such as Benny Hinn have swollen to thousands--a veritable herd of "holy" cows who command unmerited reverence from the followers they are fleecing. Cuthbert Mann Glendora Some of Hinn's good friends are my close friends.
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MAGAZINE
July 27, 2003 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, William Lobdell covers religion for The Times.
The hands of faith healer Benny Hinn--tools of a televangelist recognized around the world--are slim, almost feminine. The fingers are delicate, nails manicured and polished. A gold wedding band, so wide it covers the bottom of his left ring finger from knuckle to knuckle like a piece of copper pipe, bears the insignia of his church. The dove, symbolizing the Holy Spirit, sparkles with a cluster of diamonds.
MAGAZINE
August 17, 2003
Benny Hinn says that he is not preaching to make money ("The Price of Healing," by William Lobdell, July 27). Then why does he continue to request donations, especially if he has already received $89 million for his ministry in 2002? It is sad that so many people need to find contentment and meaning outside rather than within themselves. Hinn takes advantage of these people, who are easily persuaded and brainwashed. If he really wanted to help people, he wouldn't live so extravagantly and would donate more of his time without making requests for donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2002 | From Associated Press
GRAPEVINE, Texas--If Benny Hinn puts on a remarkable television show, the view from his side of the camera is even more incredible. Looking into viewers' homes recently, the evangelist spotted a bald, overweight man with a heart problem. Wearing a yellow shirt. Hinn said he could see the man walking away from his TV, resisting appeals to donate during a Trinity Broadcasting Network "Praise-a-Thon." "Come back," Hinn begged.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His hands were said to heal the defective heart of heavyweight champ Evander Holyfield. His silver hair and wild gestures inspired Steve Martin in his movie "Leap of Faith." Parents take their disabled children across state lines to see him. And some of those who closely watch television evangelists call him a manipulator who makes millions off the desperate and desperately ill. Benny Hinn is regarded as one of the fastest-rising televangelists in the country. And he's coming to Orange County.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His hands were said to heal the defective heart of heavyweight champ Evander Holyfield. His silver hair and wild gestures inspired Steve Martin in his movie "Leap of Faith." Parents take their disabled children across state lines to see him. And critics decry him as a manipulator who makes millions off the desperate and desperately ill. Benny Hinn is one of the fast-rising televangelists in the country. And he's coming to Orange County.
MAGAZINE
August 17, 2003
Benny Hinn says that he is not preaching to make money ("The Price of Healing," by William Lobdell, July 27). Then why does he continue to request donations, especially if he has already received $89 million for his ministry in 2002? It is sad that so many people need to find contentment and meaning outside rather than within themselves. Hinn takes advantage of these people, who are easily persuaded and brainwashed. If he really wanted to help people, he wouldn't live so extravagantly and would donate more of his time without making requests for donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2007 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Times editors assigned me to the religion beat, I believed God had answered my prayers. As a serious Christian, I had cringed at some of the coverage in the mainstream media. Faith frequently was treated like a circus, even a freak show. I wanted to report objectively and respectfully about how belief shapes people's lives. Along the way, I believed, my own faith would grow deeper and sturdier. But during the eight years I covered religion, something very different happened.
NEWS
November 22, 1991
A 24-year-old woman suffering from a brain tumor died Wednesday at the Anaheim Convention Center at a faith healing revival, just before the healing service was to start, authorities said. The woman's family had attended the Benny Hinn Miracle Invasion Crusade in hope of healing the woman who had been diagnosed with brain cancer in 1984, according to authorities.
MAGAZINE
July 27, 2003 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, William Lobdell covers religion for The Times.
The hands of faith healer Benny Hinn--tools of a televangelist recognized around the world--are slim, almost feminine. The fingers are delicate, nails manicured and polished. A gold wedding band, so wide it covers the bottom of his left ring finger from knuckle to knuckle like a piece of copper pipe, bears the insignia of his church. The dove, symbolizing the Holy Spirit, sparkles with a cluster of diamonds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2002 | From Associated Press
GRAPEVINE, Texas--If Benny Hinn puts on a remarkable television show, the view from his side of the camera is even more incredible. Looking into viewers' homes recently, the evangelist spotted a bald, overweight man with a heart problem. Wearing a yellow shirt. Hinn said he could see the man walking away from his TV, resisting appeals to donate during a Trinity Broadcasting Network "Praise-a-Thon." "Come back," Hinn begged.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His hands were said to heal the defective heart of heavyweight champ Evander Holyfield. His silver hair and wild gestures inspired Steve Martin in his movie "Leap of Faith." Parents take their disabled children across state lines to see him. And critics decry him as a manipulator who makes millions off the desperate and desperately ill. Benny Hinn is one of the fast-rising televangelists in the country. And he's coming to Orange County.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His hands were said to heal the defective heart of heavyweight champ Evander Holyfield. His silver hair and wild gestures inspired Steve Martin in his movie "Leap of Faith." Parents take their disabled children across state lines to see him. And some of those who closely watch television evangelists call him a manipulator who makes millions off the desperate and desperately ill. Benny Hinn is regarded as one of the fastest-rising televangelists in the country. And he's coming to Orange County.
SPORTS
June 7, 2008
Dan Shaughnessy, Boston Globe "It goes down in Hub hardwood history as the Miracle on Causeway Street, Paul Pierce and his Chariot of Fire." Adrian Wojnarowski, Yahoo Sports -- "So, there was Paul Pierce with his Willis Reed moment. Once again, it had been done to the Lakers." -- The Big Lead, a sports blog "A wheelchair? Seriously?. . . . We've dinged up our knee harder on our computer desk." -- Jeff Goodman, Foxsports.com "Paul Pierce didn't just win the series opener . . .
NATIONAL
January 11, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Two televangelists have resigned their posts as regents at Oral Roberts University, as the debt-ridden school tries to regroup after a spending scandal involving its former president. The university also settled Thursday with one of three professors who filed a wrongful-termination suit against the school. Benny Hinn and I.V. Hilliard resigned from the board of regents, where they were involved in making major school decisions, university spokesman Jeremy Burton said Thursday.
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