Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBerkeley Systems Inc
IN THE NEWS

Berkeley Systems Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 25, 1993
Software Firms Reach Screen Saver Settlement: Two software companies have settled a copyright infringement suit over a screen saver program that spoofed the popular flying toasters icon. Berkeley Systems Inc. and Delrina Corp. did not reveal the terms of their out-of-court agreement. In a federal suit filed in September, Berkeley Systems claimed that Delrina infringed on its copyright with a program featuring comic strip character Opus the penguin shooting at a flock of flying toasters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 10, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing its shopping binge in the entertainment software industry, Connecticut-based CUC International has agreed to acquire Berkeley Systems Inc., a maker of popular games and computer screen savers. Up to a third of Berkeley Systems' 120 employees will be laid off after the acquisition, according to company spokeswoman Monica Granados. Terms of the deal, which is scheduled to be completed Friday, were not disclosed.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Software Maker Told to Recall Programs: A federal judge in San Francisco ordered Delrina Corp. of Toronto to recall thousands of screen-saver programs that spoof the flying toasters made popular by a competitor. The order, issued Wednesday, means Delrina must recall roughly 12,500 copies of its program. Delrina has shipped the program throughout the United States and Canada. The ruling stemmed from a suit filed last month by Berkeley Systems Inc.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1993
Software Firms Reach Screen Saver Settlement: Two software companies have settled a copyright infringement suit over a screen saver program that spoofed the popular flying toasters icon. Berkeley Systems Inc. and Delrina Corp. did not reveal the terms of their out-of-court agreement. In a federal suit filed in September, Berkeley Systems claimed that Delrina infringed on its copyright with a program featuring comic strip character Opus the penguin shooting at a flock of flying toasters.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1997 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing its shopping binge in the entertainment software industry, Connecticut-based CUC International has agreed to acquire Berkeley Systems Inc., a maker of popular games and computer screen savers. Up to a third of Berkeley Systems' 120 employees will be laid off after the acquisition, according to company spokeswoman Monica Granados. Terms of the deal, which is scheduled to be completed Friday, were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES
Berkeley Systems Inc., best known for its Flying Toasters personal computer "screen saver," is hoping to make toast of a new competing product that it says violates a copyright. Berkeley Systems said it is suing Delrina Corp., a Toronto-based publisher of a screen saver featuring a cartoon penguin engaged in a shooting match with winged toasters. The penguin fires a shotgun and is in turn bombarded with burnt toast.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
Berkeley Systems Inc. said a federal judge stopped Delrina Corp. from using the disputed "Flying Toaster" symbol in Delrina's Opus 'n Bill Screen Saver computer software. Berkeley Systems said in a statement that U.S. District Judge Eugene F. Lynch ruled Berkeley Systems had a valid copyright on the symbol and issued a preliminary injunction against Delrina, a Toronto-based software developer.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | From Associated Press
Some creative programmers and artists are out to prove that the most fun you can have with your personal computer is when you're not using it. They create "screen savers," those varied displays that kick in when a computer is idle to prevent images from burning into the phosphors of a screen. And, as more people are turning on to personalizing their computer, the work is getting more sophisticated, depicting everything from comic strip characters and old movies to national parks.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you know "You Don't Know Jack," then you are hip to one of the most clever CD-ROMs, the irreverent computer game show that has won countless awards since its introduction in 1995. If you know "You Don't Know Jack Volume 2," then you know that celebrities now are equally hip to the game. The new sequel boasts guest appearances by 17 stars, ranging from Tim Allen to Erik Estrada. "CD-ROMs are the wave of the future," says Estrada, the former "CHiPs" star. "It's in good fun."
BUSINESS
October 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Software Maker Told to Recall Programs: A federal judge in San Francisco ordered Delrina Corp. of Toronto to recall thousands of screen-saver programs that spoof the flying toasters made popular by a competitor. The order, issued Wednesday, means Delrina must recall roughly 12,500 copies of its program. Delrina has shipped the program throughout the United States and Canada. The ruling stemmed from a suit filed last month by Berkeley Systems Inc.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Your computer--one of the last, great, untapped advertising mediums--is fast becoming Madison Avenue's next unabashed commercial vehicle. Already, the irrepressible Eveready "Energizer Bunny" is hopping across tens of thousands of computer screens nationwide. Last week, Universal Studios signed a deal with a computer software firm to send scenes from the hit film "Jurassic Park" swirling across computer screens.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1999 | VICKI TORRES
Women have been starting technology companies and obtaining venture capital in a mini-boom that has embraced both corporate veterans and young entrepreneurs. The changing uses of the Internet are making it possible for women, whose strengths have typically been in marketing, communication and customer service, to use their experience to create consumer-oriented technology ventures that are distinctly different from the tools- and research-oriented technology businesses started by men.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|