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Berklee College Of Music

ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN
The CalArts Contemporary Music Festival this year may be only a faint echo of past glories, but its collective ear is clearly on the future. There was more artifice than art in the opening programs, but the technologies surveyed dazzled in their own right and hold much promise. Interactive was the word in trendy neighborhoods Friday and Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wynton and Branford Marsalis are two of the most influential young musicians anywhere. But you might not have heard of Delfeayo Marsalis, unless you're a habitual reader of the fine print in CD booklets. Until now, Delfeayo Marsalis has been mainly known as a record producer who's overseen about 20 projects by such notables as his brother Branford, pianists Marcus Roberts and Kenny Kirkland and pianist-singer Harry Connick Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The career of Mike Metheny has closely paralleled that of his brother, Pat. Like Pat, he started out on trumpet (but, unlike him, he stayed with the horn while Pat, to quote Mike, "got smart and switched to guitar, an instrument that doesn't require lips"). Like Pat, Mike was raised in Lees Summit, Mo., but wound up in Boston, playing and teaching at the Berklee College of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few years ago, guitarist Juan Carlos Quintero would be popping up at jazz clubs all over the Los Angeles area, earning himself a nice following but hardly a hefty bank balance. "I saturated the town, met a lot of people, and that was great," he said on the phone this week from his home in Redondo Beach. "But I also found that a lot of club owners plain didn't want to pay the band, and I couldn't accept that."
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leonard Geoffrey Feather, a gifted composer and producer who, in the course of his career, gained wide recognition as a jazz critic, died Thursday in Encino. He was 80. Feather, who had spent his final months completing a revision of his acclaimed "Encyclopedia of Jazz," had been undergoing treatment for pneumonia for the last six weeks. He died at Encino Hospital, where he had celebrated his birthday nine days before his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1996 | SARA SCRIBNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tracy Bonham has tapped into every mom's worst nightmare: Sunny on the surface, rock-bottom desperate underneath, her song "Mother Mother" dramatizes a young woman's confessional phone call home in harrowing detail. The story behind the funny, brooding and occasionally hysterical song is just one example of how this newcomer from Boston pulls strength out of adversity and humor from dead-serious despair.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The career of Mike Metheny has closely paralleled that of his brother, Pat. Like Pat, he started out on trumpet (but, unlike him, he stayed with the horn while Pat, to quote Mike, "got smart and switched to guitar, an instrument that doesn't require lips"). Like Pat, Mike was raised in Lees Summit, Mo., but wound up in Boston, playing and teaching at the Berklee College of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
In September, 1989, Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, the oldest continuously active small group in jazz, hired a new pianist, Geoffrey Graham Keezer. It was an honor for the 18-year-old alumnus of Berklee College of Music, particularly since this was his first real full-time job. As it turned out, he was Blakey's final pianist.
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