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Berlin Germany Development And Redevelopment

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1993 | MICHAEL Z. WISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The iconoclastic New York architect Peter Eisenman is proposing a mammoth new glass landmark for the center of Berlin, but the project could be consigned to the encyclopedia of unbuilt architectural fantasies due to a controversy over its bizarre design and a property restitution wrangle involving a retired Los Angeles film producer. Eisenman hopes the 34-story Max Reinhardt House will replace the Brandenburg Gate as the symbol of Germany's once-and-future capital in the 21st Century.
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NEWS
January 26, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before East German Communist leader Walter Ulbricht blew it up 51 years ago, the Berlin Palace was the architectural signature of this city for 250 years, and the adjacent Palace Square was the bustling heart of the Prussian Empire. Now, the priceless central real estate yawns wastefully empty but for illegally parked cars, an abandoned and asbestos-laden Communist-era culture center and another shoddy postwar building about to be closed for renovation.
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NEWS
November 26, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A picture of U.S. Ambassador John Kornblum in this week's issue of Der Spiegel, Germany's most influential weekly newsmagazine, shows him in a cowboy hat and sheriff's badge, blowing on the muzzle of a smoking gun. The photograph of the envoy as wannabe Wyatt Earp is from this year's Mardi Gras celebration in Cologne, where Kornblum served as master of ceremonies for the annual masquerade.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1999 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
Once again, architecture is taking center stage! Or so it seems with the increasing number of cities that are hoping major new cultural landmarks will make them the next stop on the tourist train. This year, Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art hired Frank Gehry to design a major new addition. London is about to open its new Richard Rogers-designed Millennium Dome, with the queen in attendance, and the Basel-based Herzog & de Meuron is designing the new De Young Museum building in San Francisco.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talking to retired Kellermeister Lothar Wrosch, the grit, traffic and pardon-our-dust signs of modern Berlin slip out of mind and you can almost hear the clopping of horses' hooves and feel the cool, damp air of a turn-of-the-century wine cellar. Wrosch spent his youth tending the vintages in the vast cave of the Hotel Adlon, between-the-wars Berlin's answer to the Ritz or the Plaza, and he is proud to tell of it. To this day, he has kept his dogeared wine lists.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small town in Germany just got smaller. As the reality of the historic Bundestag vote to move the capital to Berlin began to sink in Friday, this bucolic "federal village" on the Rhine anxiously pondered a future without its sole industry: government. Mayor Hans Daniels and the City Council adopted a slew of resolutions demanding compensation for the university town of 300,000, where one-third of the population relies on Bonn's being the capital for their livelihood.
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a solemn open-air ceremony timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the fall of Nazi Germany, Berlin's stunning New Synagogue was reopened Sunday after decades in ruins. "Our burden of responsibility is very high," said Jerzy Kanal, chairman of the Jewish Community of Berlin, which represents a much-reduced population of about 10,000. "We must fill this house with new life, and not just old Jewish history."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1999 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
Once again, architecture is taking center stage! Or so it seems with the increasing number of cities that are hoping major new cultural landmarks will make them the next stop on the tourist train. This year, Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art hired Frank Gehry to design a major new addition. London is about to open its new Richard Rogers-designed Millennium Dome, with the queen in attendance, and the Basel-based Herzog & de Meuron is designing the new De Young Museum building in San Francisco.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the renovated streets and plazas of this soon-to-be-rebuilt capital, the most splendid is to be Pariser Platz, the square directly in the late-afternoon shadows of Berlin's pillared Brandenburg Gate. Already, a stately hotel is nearing completion on the square, prestigious future bank buildings are tantalizingly veiled by scaffolding and plans have been selected for the future French and British embassies. The United States is to be part of Pariser Platz's restored classical elegance too.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the mid-1700s, Frederick the Great dreamed of turning the provincial backwater of Berlin into a city more suitable for the capital of the new, powerful Prussia he ruled. While he managed some change, his vision of building a cultural jewel--a latter-day Athens of the north--eventually faded, and he retreated to nearby Potsdam and his grand estate, Sans Souci. The idea of transforming Berlin, however, lived on.
NEWS
November 26, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A picture of U.S. Ambassador John Kornblum in this week's issue of Der Spiegel, Germany's most influential weekly newsmagazine, shows him in a cowboy hat and sheriff's badge, blowing on the muzzle of a smoking gun. The photograph of the envoy as wannabe Wyatt Earp is from this year's Mardi Gras celebration in Cologne, where Kornblum served as master of ceremonies for the annual masquerade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1999 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
All cities are intricate historical recordings, their buildings repositories of happy and failed lives, of national ambitions and personal hopes. But in Berlin, the scars of history reach an operatic scale. Nineteenth century imperial ambitions, the chaotic freedom of the Weimar Republic, the horrors of Hitler's Third Reich, the fractured culture of the Cold War--all are forever embedded in the city's collective memory. For a decade, Berlin has been trying to mend that fractured past.
NEWS
November 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder on Tuesday convened the first Cabinet meeting here since Adolf Hitler was in power--in a symbolic show of impatience over the stalled move of the capital from Bonn, where the new leader works in the shadow of Helmut Kohl. Schroeder, who succeeded Kohl only four weeks ago, has repeatedly pushed the army of builders and planners at work refitting this city to speed up construction of the new government quarters along the Spree River.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the renovated streets and plazas of this soon-to-be-rebuilt capital, the most splendid is to be Pariser Platz, the square directly in the late-afternoon shadows of Berlin's pillared Brandenburg Gate. Already, a stately hotel is nearing completion on the square, prestigious future bank buildings are tantalizingly veiled by scaffolding and plans have been selected for the future French and British embassies. The United States is to be part of Pariser Platz's restored classical elegance too.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talking to retired Kellermeister Lothar Wrosch, the grit, traffic and pardon-our-dust signs of modern Berlin slip out of mind and you can almost hear the clopping of horses' hooves and feel the cool, damp air of a turn-of-the-century wine cellar. Wrosch spent his youth tending the vintages in the vast cave of the Hotel Adlon, between-the-wars Berlin's answer to the Ritz or the Plaza, and he is proud to tell of it. To this day, he has kept his dogeared wine lists.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than two decades, motorists--and there are plenty in this land in love with the internal combustion engine--have pressed for the construction of a tunnel beneath the congestion in the heart of this sprawling city. Now their dream is about to be fulfilled--and some Berliners are wondering if the lobbying hasn't paid off too richly. A huge park, the Tiergarten, lies in the middle of Berlin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1999 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
All cities are intricate historical recordings, their buildings repositories of happy and failed lives, of national ambitions and personal hopes. But in Berlin, the scars of history reach an operatic scale. Nineteenth century imperial ambitions, the chaotic freedom of the Weimar Republic, the horrors of Hitler's Third Reich, the fractured culture of the Cold War--all are forever embedded in the city's collective memory. For a decade, Berlin has been trying to mend that fractured past.
NEWS
November 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder on Tuesday convened the first Cabinet meeting here since Adolf Hitler was in power--in a symbolic show of impatience over the stalled move of the capital from Bonn, where the new leader works in the shadow of Helmut Kohl. Schroeder, who succeeded Kohl only four weeks ago, has repeatedly pushed the army of builders and planners at work refitting this city to speed up construction of the new government quarters along the Spree River.
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a solemn open-air ceremony timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the fall of Nazi Germany, Berlin's stunning New Synagogue was reopened Sunday after decades in ruins. "Our burden of responsibility is very high," said Jerzy Kanal, chairman of the Jewish Community of Berlin, which represents a much-reduced population of about 10,000. "We must fill this house with new life, and not just old Jewish history."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1993 | MICHAEL Z. WISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The iconoclastic New York architect Peter Eisenman is proposing a mammoth new glass landmark for the center of Berlin, but the project could be consigned to the encyclopedia of unbuilt architectural fantasies due to a controversy over its bizarre design and a property restitution wrangle involving a retired Los Angeles film producer. Eisenman hopes the 34-story Max Reinhardt House will replace the Brandenburg Gate as the symbol of Germany's once-and-future capital in the 21st Century.
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