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Bernanke

BUSINESS
September 3, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke said Thursday that there was no way for the government to rescue Lehman Bros. from failure in 2008 without a huge loss of taxpayer money, and that he should have been "more straightforward" when explaining the decision to Congress shortly afterward. Appearing before the federal panel investigating the financial crisis, Bernanke said his vague congressional testimony less than two weeks after Lehman's collapse had helped feed what he called a myth that the investment bank could have been saved.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 2009 | By Don Lee
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke on Thursday defended the central bank's record and argued for preserving its regulatory powers, but lawmakers in both parties were unmoved as they lobbed sharp criticisms at him and the Fed for lapses that contributed to the financial crisis. Bernanke is widely expected to win a second term as chairman, but the confirmation hearing before the Senate Banking Committee provided new evidence of the intense resentment in Congress over what is seen as the Fed's failure to tighten credit and curb financial risk-taking in time to avert the worst economic downturn since the 1930s.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke told lawmakers Wednesday that regulatory failures by the central bank helped trigger the financial crisis, but that doesn't mean they should strip the agency of much or all of its oversight of individual banks. The Fed has been under intense fire for not heading off the meltdown of the housing and financial markets. The criticism has been particularly harsh in Congress, where lawmakers are considering a sweeping overhaul of financial regulations that would curtail the central bank's role in bank supervision.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
A snowstorm Wednesday didn't keep Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke from outlining to lawmakers how the central bank might pull back its unprecedented intervention in the U.S. economy. But how exactly the long-awaited exit strategy would be deployed was obscured in a blizzard of ambiguities. "Although at present the U.S. economy continues to require the support of highly accommodative monetary policies, at some point the Federal Reserve will need to tighten financial conditions by raising short-term interest rates and reducing the quantity of bank reserves outstanding," Bernanke wrote in prepared testimony for a hearing Wednesday by the House Financial Services Committee.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A House panel has subpoenaed documents that lawmakers say could shed new light on Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke's role in Bank of America Corp.'s acquisition of Merrill Lynch & Co. The subpoena comes before a hearing next week in which Bernanke is scheduled to testify. Lawmakers have accused Bernanke and President Bush's Treasury secretary, Henry M. Paulson, of pressuring Bank of America Chief Executive Kenneth Lewis into the deal and urging him to keep quiet about Merrill's financial problems.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2010 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke, citing the threat of prolonged high unemployment and an economy potentially falling into a dangerous deflationary spiral, laid out a case Friday for the central bank to buy more U.S. government bonds in a bid to bolster growth. But in a much-anticipated speech in Boston, Bernanke also made it clear that there were long-term risks ? for the economy and the Fed's credibility ? in cranking up the electronic printing press and pumping hundreds of billions of dollars into the financial system.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2010 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke on Wednesday said he expected the country's economic recovery to remain on track despite Europe's debt crisis. But he indicated at a congressional hearing that U.S. growth was unlikely to be fast enough to produce enough new jobs to make a sizable dent in the high unemployment rate anytime soon. Although hiring prospects have improved, Bernanke said, "a significant amount of time will be required to restore the nearly 8.5 million jobs that were lost in 2008 and 2009."
BUSINESS
July 23, 2009 | Neil Irwin, Irwin writes for the Washington Post.
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke on Wednesday suggested that protecting users of financial products be formally made part of the central bank's mission, as he sought to head off a congressional assault on the Fed's consumer protection powers. In his second day of testimony on monetary policy, Bernanke told the Senate Banking Committee that the Fed should not be stripped of its role protecting consumers from unsafe credit cards, mortgages and other financial products.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice for replacing Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke probably comes down to a quiet consensus builder, who would be a historic pick, or one considered brilliant but difficult to work with. Through unprecedented policy moves and public outreach, Bernanke has dramatically expanded the role and the profile of the nation's central bank. But neither he nor the White House have indicated whether he would seek a third term or be renominated. It is widely expected, though, that Bernanke will step down when his current term expires in January.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke defended the Fed's controversial actions to stimulate the U.S. economy, saying central banks worldwide need to be "creative and innovative" in responding to economic crises. Bernanke, facing perhaps the sharpest criticism of his tenure, delivered a scholarly but pointed address Friday in Europe, where some skeptical nations have joined China and U.S. critics in questioning the Fed's plan to pump $600 billion into the domestic economy. "On its current economic trajectory, the United States runs the risk of seeing millions of workers unemployed or underemployed for many years," Bernanke said.
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