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Bernard C Parks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2002 | ANNA GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of contentious political debate over Bernard C. Parks' bid for a second term as LAPD police chief, he was honored Saturday, his official last day, as a role model and public servant whose work has improved Los Angeles. Parks, wearing a suit and tie, received a standing ovation as he stood to speak to about 150 people at Ted Watkins Park in Watts, where a sidewalk plaque was dedicated to him. Appearing relaxed, he smiled, nodded and thanked the audience.
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NEWS
April 10, 2002
Chief Parks has served 37 years in the Los Angeles Police Department. Here are some of the milestones in his career: February 1965: Enters police academy at LAPD. Works in traffic division initially. * August 1977: Is named a captain after stints as a sergeant and detective. * July 1980: Promoted to the rank of commander. February 1988: Named deputy chief. * June 1992: The Police Commission, haunted by the 1992 riots, appoints outsider Willie L. Williams as police chief.
OPINION
April 4, 2002 | RON SEBAN and RICHARD EIDE
Bernard C. Parks should not be offered a new five-year contract as chief of the Los Angeles Police Department. His policies have led to mismanagement of the department. The cost of his policies in terms of the police mission, as well as the human toll, outweighs any benefit he may claim. These are the issues that have characterized Parks' tenure: * Recruitment. Parks has created a working environment of fear, hostility and distrust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks will discuss a number of issues at tonight's meeting of the Sherman Oaks Homeowners Assn. Parks is expected to talk about the Rampart Division controversy, the return of the senior lead officers, increased crime and implementation of a federal consent decree on reforming the Los Angeles Police Department, said Richard Close, association president. The public meeting will begin at 8 p.m. at The Ventura, 13920 Ventura Blvd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000
On behalf of the Gonzalez and Parks families, I would like to thank the people of the community for their kind expressions of support during this difficult time. The outpouring of sympathy and prayers for my family on the loss of my granddaughter has been a comfort to all of us. BERNARD C. PARKS Chief of Police, Los Angeles
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a stunning rebuke, Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks has unilaterally ordered his detectives to deny county prosecutors access to information regarding the ongoing Rampart corruption investigation, sources said Tuesday. Parks, sources said, blames Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti for mishandling the six-month probe, alleging that prosecutors have given the LAPD bad legal advice and can no longer be trusted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 37-year-daughter of Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks was arraigned Monday in a Las Vegas courtroom on felony drug charges, authorities said. Michelle Lynette Parks, a civilian clerk for the LAPD, is accused of conspiracy to sell cocaine and trafficking in cocaine. After her arraignment, Parks was released on her own recognizance and ordered to return to court Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Chief Bernard C. Parks told his Police Commission bosses Tuesday that the department has carried out most of the recommendations proposed in two reports critical of the LAPD's handling of discipline. Parks said the department will press forward over the next year to completely resolve all the issues raised by the commission's inspector general in her 1997 Six-Month Report, and by the department's own probe of former Det. Mark Fuhrman's taped allegations of police brutality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years after the Christopher Commission proposed sweeping reforms of the Los Angeles Police Department, Chief Bernard C. Parks declared Wednesday that the LAPD has embraced nearly all of the recommendations and has succeeded in changing a police culture that was "aloof" from the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1998 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Escalating the war of words with his officers' union, Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks on Tuesday called the Police Protective League's directors "nine tired old men" who are out of touch with their members. "They're dated and stuck in a time warp," Parks told reporters after a regularly scheduled meeting with his Police Commission bosses. "Really, they are an embarrassment."
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