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Bernard Cornwell

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Behind the action of Simon Armitage's marvelous translation of the Middle English epic "The Death of King Arthur" (W.W. Norton: 306 pp., $26.95), there's an unmistakable mood of bitterness. It has nothing to do with Arthur's fate -- yes, there's plenty of bitter sorrow after Arthur's last battle against Mordred, but that's not what I'm talking about. There's another, different bitterness here that belongs to the anonymous maker of this poem, which appeared long before Thomas Malory ever celebrated the legendary warrior-king in his prose "Le Morte D'Arthur.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Behind the action of Simon Armitage's marvelous translation of the Middle English epic "The Death of King Arthur" (W.W. Norton: 306 pp., $26.95), there's an unmistakable mood of bitterness. It has nothing to do with Arthur's fate -- yes, there's plenty of bitter sorrow after Arthur's last battle against Mordred, but that's not what I'm talking about. There's another, different bitterness here that belongs to the anonymous maker of this poem, which appeared long before Thomas Malory ever celebrated the legendary warrior-king in his prose "Le Morte D'Arthur.
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BOOKS
October 25, 1998
Claudia Albert, administrative assistant: "Cruel As the Grave" by Sharon Kay Penman (Henry Holt). "Writing well and writing a good mystery don't always go together. But Penman does it in this exceptionally well-researched, well-crafted story about Eleanor of Aquitaine, Prince John and Richard Lion-Heart." **** Margaret Gascoigne, teacher: "Paula" by Isabel Allende (HarperCollins). "This is a wonderful, interesting, sad book.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2000
As a resident of Marina del Rey who makes frequent car trips to Manhattan Beach, I have had ample opportunity to drive past Los Angeles International Airport and enjoy the new illuminated columns along Century Boulevard ("(S)light Turbulence," Aug. 15). I find Nicolai Ouroussoff's criticism far too harsh. Though he may be schooled in all things aesthetic and architectural, I say, "Nicolai, dude, lighten up!" I love the light show and I suspect many other Angelenos do too. In fact, my husband and I are searching for just the right vantage point to pull over and safely watch these beautiful light sabers color the night sky. Cheap date?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1993 | RAY LOYND
It infrequently happens on "Masterpiece Theatre" that the introductions are more absorbing than the drama. That is the case with the four-part Napoleonic Wars saga "Sharpe" (beginning Sunday at 9 p.m. on KCET-TV Channel 28 and KPBS-TV Channel 15, 8 p.m. on KVCR-TV Channel 24 and Tuesday at 8 p.m. on KOCE-TV Channel 50).
BOOKS
September 4, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Ever since his debut in "The Big Fix," Roger L. Simon's Moses Wine has been an entertaining tour guide through Southern California social history. Initially a '60s liberal in search of his lost illusions, Wine seems now to be an Undecided, a variant private eye whose wisecracking conceals--fails to conceal--a sensitive man with only a fairness doctrine for a credo.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010
SERIES Breakout: This new, eight-part series revisits some of the most high-profile prison breaks in recent history, starting with "The Texas Seven," a 2000 case in which seven criminals escape from the Connally Unit in Texas (6 and 9 p.m. National Geographic). The Amazing Race 16: Teams take a helicopter ride to a remote island paradise in the Indian Ocean in this new episode (8 p.m. CBS). Life: The Discovery Channel airs two new installments of its stunning documentary miniseries, with "Mammals" at 8 p.m. followed by "Fish" at 9. Family Guy: Chris and Meg injure Stewie and try to cover it up on a new episode of the raunchy animated series (9 p.m. Fox)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2004 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Sharpe's Escape Portugal, 1810 Bernard Cornwell HarperCollins: 358 pp., $25.95 * BERNARD CORNWELL'S 19 novels about Richard Sharpe, an infantry officer in the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars, have been popular in Britain and Canada. The last one, "Sharpe's Havoc," also did well in the United States. With his latest, "Sharpe's Escape," the publisher is obviously hoping to duplicate the American success of C.S.
BOOKS
February 10, 2008
PAPERBACKS 1. Atonement by Ian McEwan ($14.95) *--* Fiction weeks on list 1. Duma Key by Stephen King (Scribner: $28) A man takes up 1 painting as therapy, only to discover his canvases have an uncontrollable power over him. 2. People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks (Viking: $25.95) 4 A rare-books expert traces the history of a priceless Jewish tome to 15th century Spain. 3. Blasphemy by Douglas Preston (Forge: $25.
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