Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBernard Lafferty
IN THE NEWS

Bernard Lafferty

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1995 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A New York State Supreme Court justice has dismissed a $30-million breach of contract suit filed by the three former employees of tobacco heiress Doris Duke whose accusations have helped fuel investigations into Duke's death and management of her $1.2-billion estate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
You don't need to know or care who Doris Duke was, or the part her last butler, Bernard Lafferty, played in her life, to get something good out of "Bernard and Doris," an excellent new HBO movie about their relationship. But I will tell you anyway: Duke was a tobacco and energy heiress who inherited her father's fortune in 1925 at the age of 12, becoming a figure of public fascination in her time, much as Paris Hilton is in ours but without the sex tapes or reality show or trip to jail.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
May 18, 1997 | Paul Lieberman, Paul Lieberman is a Times editor whose last magazine article was about Zen golf
I must ask for patience, first from those of you who would rush right to the seance in which we speak to Bernard Lafferty, the Billion Dollar Butler, from beyond the grave. Patience, please. Two other nights with spirits come first, one at the doorstep of the great Valentino, the other with Miss Elizabeth Taylor seated in the front row. * I ask for patience, too, from those of you who would scoff at this whole seance business. I understand, I really do.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The TV miniseries may take away Bernard Lafferty's ponytail, along with his dignity, but it does have this much right--wealth did not bring him happiness. I last saw the Billion-Dollar Butler just weeks before his death, when he invited me over to tour the mansion he'd bought above Beverly Hills with the settlement he'd gotten for bowing out, once and for all, as executor of the estate of Doris Duke, the woman he'd served and been accused by some of murdering.
NEWS
January 26, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawyers in the bitter fight over the $1.2-billion estate of Doris Duke met Thursday in Manhattan Surrogate's Court to work out a settlement that could finally send the tobacco heiress' money to charity more than two years after her death. While no final agreement was reached during the closed-door meetings before Surrogate Judge Eve M.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Surrogate's Court judge formally approved a compromise plan to send the bulk of tobacco heiress Doris Duke's $1.2-billion estate to charity. The settlement was partially paved by an agreement that Duke's former butler, Bernard Lafferty, will play no role in the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in return for a $4.5-million executor's fee and a $500,000 annual bequest. The foundation's board will be enlarged and the fees that trustees receive will be cut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1995
The strange case of Doris Duke (April 10) and the controversy following her death, including the vilification of her butler Bernard Lafferty, present us with a classic lesson. Henrik Ibsen summed it up best when he wrote, "Money may be the husk of things, but not the kernel. It brings food but not appetite, medicine but not health, acquaintances but not friends, servants but not faithfulness, days of joy but not peace or happiness." Duke never smiled in her pictures: not when she was 10, not when she was 25, not when she was 70. What a lonely life she led, composed of fear and suspicion.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After the apparent collapse of settlement talks in the fight over Doris Duke's $1.2-billion estate, lawyers for Bernard Lafferty--the heiress' former butler who was named her executor in her last will--filed court papers Monday asking the judge who is hearing the case to step aside. U.S. Trust Co. of New York, the bank that Lafferty brought in as co-executor, joined the motion to remove Surrogate Judge Eve M.
NEWS
January 1, 1996 | PAUL LIEBERMAN
In his first public comments in nine months, the man at the center of the Doris Duke will dispute, Bernard Lafferty, the heiress' former butler, said he will not agree to any settlement that denies him a role in the $1.2-billion estate destined to become the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months after Doris Duke's deathbed nurse alleged that the tobacco heiress was murdered with overdoses of drugs, the criminal investigation into Duke's death has finally ended--finding "no credible evidence" she was murdered. The highly publicized allegations by nurse Tammy Payette--that Duke's former butler and doctor conspired to kill her with morphine and Demerol--threw into turmoil the heiress's $1.
MAGAZINE
May 18, 1997 | Paul Lieberman, Paul Lieberman is a Times editor whose last magazine article was about Zen golf
I must ask for patience, first from those of you who would rush right to the seance in which we speak to Bernard Lafferty, the Billion Dollar Butler, from beyond the grave. Patience, please. Two other nights with spirits come first, one at the doorstep of the great Valentino, the other with Miss Elizabeth Taylor seated in the front row. * I ask for patience, too, from those of you who would scoff at this whole seance business. I understand, I really do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bernard Lafferty, the butler made wealthy by the will of his billionaire boss, Doris Duke, has left his own estate to charity "in memory of" the woman he served. In his own will filed Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court, Lafferty provided that every penny of his assets go to the Doris Duke Foundation to benefit causes favored by the tobacco heiress, including the "performing arts . . . ecological concerns [and] medical research, provided that animals are not used."
NEWS
November 5, 1996 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years and a week after the death of the famous woman he served--the event that thrust him into wealth, but also unrelenting controversy--Bernard Lafferty, the billion-dollar butler, died early Monday morning. "His heart just stopped," his lawyer said. Lafferty had been at the side of his boss, 80-year-old tobacco heiress Doris Duke, when she died Oct. 28, 1993, at Falcon Lair, the gated Benedict Canyon home built for Rudolph Valentino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months after Doris Duke's deathbed nurse alleged that the tobacco heiress was murdered with overdoses of drugs, the criminal investigation into Duke's death has finally ended--finding "no credible evidence" she was murdered. The highly publicized allegations by nurse Tammy Payette--that Duke's former butler and doctor conspired to kill her with morphine and Demerol--threw into turmoil the heiress's $1.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Surrogate's Court judge formally approved a compromise plan to send the bulk of tobacco heiress Doris Duke's $1.2-billion estate to charity. The settlement was partially paved by an agreement that Duke's former butler, Bernard Lafferty, will play no role in the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in return for a $4.5-million executor's fee and a $500,000 annual bequest. The foundation's board will be enlarged and the fees that trustees receive will be cut.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Surrogate's Court judge in Manhattan said Tuesday that she will approve a plan to finally send Doris Duke's $1.2-billion estate to charity--and end one of the biggest will fights of the century. Culminating a week of behind-the-scenes negotiations, Judge Eve M.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The TV miniseries may take away Bernard Lafferty's ponytail, along with his dignity, but it does have this much right--wealth did not bring him happiness. I last saw the Billion-Dollar Butler just weeks before his death, when he invited me over to tour the mansion he'd bought above Beverly Hills with the settlement he'd gotten for bowing out, once and for all, as executor of the estate of Doris Duke, the woman he'd served and been accused by some of murdering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bernard Lafferty, the butler made wealthy by the will of his billionaire boss, Doris Duke, has left his own estate to charity "in memory of" the woman he served. In his own will filed Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court, Lafferty provided that every penny of his assets go to the Doris Duke Foundation to benefit causes favored by the tobacco heiress, including the "performing arts . . . ecological concerns [and] medical research, provided that animals are not used."
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | PAUL LIEBERMAN and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The central parties in the bitter fight over the $1.2-billion estate of Doris Duke announced Wednesday that they have reached a settlement that finally could send the tobacco heiress' fortune to charity more than two years after her death. Under the agreement, the controversial executor named in Duke's last will--her former butler, Bernard Lafferty--would relinquish any role in administering the estate or the new Doris Duke Charitable Foundation but still would get a $4.
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After the apparent collapse of settlement talks in the fight over Doris Duke's $1.2-billion estate, lawyers for Bernard Lafferty--the heiress' former butler who was named her executor in her last will--filed court papers Monday asking the judge who is hearing the case to step aside. U.S. Trust Co. of New York, the bank that Lafferty brought in as co-executor, joined the motion to remove Surrogate Judge Eve M.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|