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Bernard Schwartz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Bernard Schwartz, a film producer who prided himself on showcasing stories that demonstrated what he called "triumph of the human spirit," such as "Coal Miner's Daughter" and "Sweet Dreams," has died. He was 85. Schwartz died Friday in Los Angeles of complications after a stroke.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Bernard Schwartz, a film producer who prided himself on showcasing stories that demonstrated what he called "triumph of the human spirit," such as "Coal Miner's Daughter" and "Sweet Dreams," has died. He was 85. Schwartz died Friday in Los Angeles of complications after a stroke.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1996 | KENNETH CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Loral Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Bernard L. Schwartz, Lockheed Martin Corp.'s planned acquisition of his company's defense electronics operations marks a triumph and a new beginning. Twenty-three years ago, Schwartz took over a tiny, failing electronics company in Brooklyn, N.Y. Through merger after merger, Schwartz turned it into Loral, one of the world's largest defense companies that now is poised to fetch one of the highest prices ever paid for a defense company operation.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton authorized a U.S. aerospace firm to launch a satellite in China earlier this year, despite warnings from the Justice Department that the move would jeopardize an ongoing investigation of the company, headed by a major Democratic donor, according to internal documents released Friday by the White House. National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said in a memo to the president on Feb.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Bernard L. Schwartz, chairman and chief executive of New York-based Loral Corp., doesn't make any apologies for the fact that his $3.2 million in compensation made him the defense industry's highest-paid executive last year. Asked recently about his compensation, Schwartz said: "We're in a competitive market and we pay well for good performance. I'm reminded of a remark made by Babe Ruth when he was asked why he made more money than the President. He said, 'Well, I had a better year.'
BUSINESS
August 25, 1992 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
The confusion continues for Loral Aeronutronic's 1,700 employees in Newport Beach. Bernard Schwartz, chairman of parent Loral Corp. in New York, told the Dallas Morning News that 300 to 500 jobs will probably be transferred from Newport Beach to a plant in Camden, Ark. Loral will acquire the Arkansas plant Aug. 31 as part of its $475-million purchase of the aerospace operation of Dallas-based LTV Corp.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton authorized a U.S. aerospace firm to launch a satellite in China earlier this year, despite warnings from the Justice Department that the move would jeopardize an ongoing investigation of the company, headed by a major Democratic donor, according to internal documents released Friday by the White House. National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said in a memo to the president on Feb.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Wall Street, Loral Corp. Chairman Bernard Schwartz is something of a hero. Stock watchers use adjectives such as "brilliant" and "amazing" to describe his acquisition strategy, which has transformed a small, money-losing New York company into a highly profitable, $1.27-billion defense electronics leader. But on Main Street, Schwartz's reputation is a bit less stellar. His strict devotion to quarterly profit growth sometimes means belt tightening at newly acquired companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2006 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
Riverside County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Schwartz was censured Thursday by the state Commission on Judicial Performance for statements he made to police during his arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol last year in Pismo Beach. The director of the commission said censure was the panel's most serious punishment short of being removed from the bench. Schwartz, 45, can continue to preside over criminal hearings.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2001
* Loral Space & Communications Ltd. is abandoning its plan to offer high-speed Internet service to consumers, Chief Executive Bernard Schwartz said. Loral will stick with its main businesses, which include making satellites and leasing satellite communications capacity to corporate customers, Schwartz said at the Carmel Group's DBS 2001 conference in Los Angeles. Loral will act as a supplier of Internet and other broadband services to its customers rather than sell directly to consumers.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1996 | KENNETH CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Loral Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Bernard L. Schwartz, Lockheed Martin Corp.'s planned acquisition of his company's defense electronics operations marks a triumph and a new beginning. Twenty-three years ago, Schwartz took over a tiny, failing electronics company in Brooklyn, N.Y. Through merger after merger, Schwartz turned it into Loral, one of the world's largest defense companies that now is poised to fetch one of the highest prices ever paid for a defense company operation.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1992 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
The confusion continues for Loral Aeronutronic's 1,700 employees in Newport Beach. Bernard Schwartz, chairman of parent Loral Corp. in New York, told the Dallas Morning News that 300 to 500 jobs will probably be transferred from Newport Beach to a plant in Camden, Ark. Loral will acquire the Arkansas plant Aug. 31 as part of its $475-million purchase of the aerospace operation of Dallas-based LTV Corp.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1990 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Bernard L. Schwartz, chairman and chief executive of New York-based Loral Corp., doesn't make any apologies for the fact that his $3.2 million in compensation made him the defense industry's highest-paid executive last year. Asked recently about his compensation, Schwartz said: "We're in a competitive market and we pay well for good performance. I'm reminded of a remark made by Babe Ruth when he was asked why he made more money than the President. He said, 'Well, I had a better year.'
BUSINESS
August 5, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Wall Street, Loral Corp. Chairman Bernard Schwartz is something of a hero. Stock watchers use adjectives such as "brilliant" and "amazing" to describe his acquisition strategy, which has transformed a small, money-losing New York company into a highly profitable, $1.27-billion defense electronics leader. But on Main Street, Schwartz's reputation is a bit less stellar. His strict devotion to quarterly profit growth sometimes means belt tightening at newly acquired companies.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Loral Space & Communications Ltd., the No. 2 U.S. satellite communications company, said lenders agreed to extend maturities of $1.09 billion in bank loans being used to increase its satellite fleet. The maturities were extended to January 2005 and their amortization schedules revised, Loral said. The changes will reduce Loral's principal payments after its investment in a satellite phone operator soured and sales fell.
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