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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985
In all my years of Calendar Letter watching, I have never found an anti-Martin Bernheimer letter that was not paired with a pro-Bernheimer letter. . . . Somebody has a magic wand. KEN BOULDEN Los Angeles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2009 | Corina Knoll
Alain Bernheim, a producer and literary agent who with humorist Art Buchwald sued Paramount Pictures for using their concept for the 1988 film "Coming to America," has died. He was 86. Bernheim, a Hollywood Hills resident, died Friday of complications during dialysis treatment at a hospital in Paris, said his wife, Marjorie. The couple, who were married for 54 years, own a vacation home near the Bois de Boulogne to which they return for several months each year. Bernheim had asked to make the annual trip despite undergoing dialysis for recent kidney failure.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1991
So much for democratization! I agree with Bernheimer's every word. ELAINE LIVESEY-FASSEL Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1996
Bravo and thank you, Martin Bernheimer! The Verdi of music critics. Never content with mediocrity. For the insight, knowledge, wit, brilliant and delicious way with words. Always candid and passionate about the arts. A humanist, long overdue for another Pulitzer Prize. Auf Wiedersehen, keep in touch. ANNE LUCKERMAN Tustin
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1985
Thanks to Bernheimer for giving Philip Glass his due DUE, due DUE, due DUE. Doo-doo. MARK MILLER Valencia
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1986
Bernheimer awarded one of his annual Beckmessers to John Clifford for the "artistic as well as fiscal poverty" of his now defunct Los Angeles Ballet Company. Bernheimer titled this particular award, "Reluctant we-told-you-so award." That is in error. It should have been called the "Enthusiastically kick-'em-when-they're-down award." JAN CAROTHERS San Gabriel
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1989
"The Phantom of the Opera" takes us flying on wings of splendid, romantic elation. Something the Bernheimer of the Calendar has never done. STEPHEN GROSSCUP Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986
I'm an artist and music lover and loved Bernheimer's cascade of words to describe Leonard Bernstein. I had to keep my eyes closed during the concert, as he suggested, to get any musical sensation. The crowd adored it! Are all audiences equally susceptible? I'm grateful to Bernheimer for sticking to his own standards and now bowing to crowd pressure. MITCHELL BINGHAM Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1989
On Feb. 3 Bernheimer lambastes Barry Cooper's reconstruction of Beethoven's 10th Symphony sketches. Feb. 4 he criticizes Previn for judiciously cutting "Corona." As Bernheimer would have it, we should not hear "new" melodies of a musical giant, but we should pay to listen to Erickson's "unison F-natural for 25 minutes." Mr. Previn simply showed good judgment in striking a balance between his obligations to Mr. Erickson and to the paying audience. DAVID M. DOLAN South Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1988
Sending Bernheimer to review Philip Glass' "1000 Airplanes on the Roof" was like sending Klaus Barbie to review "Fiddler on the Roof." Haven't the editors figured out yet that this man hates anything and everything Glass has ever written? Unless Bernheimer has some personal vendetta that he seeks to prosecute via his masochistic attendance then tired diatribe, please send another reviewer! Some people would like to read a review that discusses the work against Glass' other work, if it is derivative or an evolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1996
I will miss Martin Bernheimer's criticism ("Times Critic Bernheimer to Leave After 30 Years," Feb. 15). He has frequently amused me, occasionally enraged me, often educated me . . . but never bored me. PHIL PETTY Newport Beach We are sorry that Martin Bernheimer is leaving The Times, but we realize that 30 years is a long time to be in such a demanding position. We have enjoyed his definitive reviews and commentaries (sometimes agreeing, and disagreeing at other times)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
After more than 30 years of writing music and dance criticism for The Times, Martin Bernheimer is leaving to pursue other projects. Among his many distinctions, Bernheimer, 59, won a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1981, and he is a regular lecturer and quiz panelist on the Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts. He has also taught criticism at USC, UCLA, Cal State Northridge and CalArts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1995
When a review of an American Independence Day Concert at the Hollywood Bowl ("Amber Waves Are Plain at the Bowl," Calendar, July 4) begins with a quote from Samuel Johnson that "patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel," it is clear that an attempt is being made by another writer to sneer at good, clean American fun. What a pity that Timothy Mangan, although he admits that "we had fun," felt compelled to try to out-Bernheimer Bernheimer....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1995
Re Martin Bernheimer's "Nureyev Mania: The Afterlife" (Feb. 19): I highly reject Bernheimer's dismissive tone to an artist that was sent to us by the gods to do more than merely "entertain"--he elevated us! Yes, there were times when his work could make you sad, like when I saw him in Brussels, dancing in a stadium on a makeshift stage that made noise with his every jete, but even this was better than not seeing him at all. Yes, sad or not, he was his work . You can ask anyone who ever saw Nureyev--if the man possessed anything that wasn't for sale at Christie's auction house, it was magic . RON LINK West Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1993
Regarding Pamela Waterman's Counterpunch, "A Reminder: It's the Music, Singing That Really Count" (June 14): All one has to do is peruse the review ("A Not-So-Fine Madness," June 1) to the section dealing with one's interest: music and singing or setting and history. (But remember that one may not hear or see the same performance as the one reviewed opening night.) If the music and singing were most important, then one could attend only concert performances or stay at home, listening to recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1992
I congratulate Bernheimer wholeheartedly for the valiant expose of Glass' latest operatic utterance. I am glad that his comments on Glass' moronic music accompanied me for breakfast yesterday. Just to check, once more, the gentleman's music, I bravely endured the three-hour somnolence that was hailed by many as a new masterpiece. What sad times these are indeed! When even the Met plays the mediocrity game, framed by the splendors provided by a $2-million production, the best thing to do is to abandon ship and retire to an elegant ivory tower, so as to protect the few levels of one's sanity still left intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1992
Martin Bernheimer's review of "Napoli" by the Royal Danish Ballet ("A Fleet, Stylish 'Napoli,' " June 11) confirmed his unerring sense of taste: directly the opposite of mine. He liked it! According to Bernheimer, the program consists of an "inspired fusion of Italian street rituals, florid Gallic accents and polite Danish manners." I witnessed two acts of arm-waving pantomime, followed by a third act of muted leg movement. I understand why audiences usually have only the third act inflicted upon them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Art Buchwald won the first two phases of his breach-of-contract trial against Paramount Pictures, many Hollywood insiders agree that he fared poorly in the third. Given Judge Harvey A. Schneider's determination that "Coming to America" was based on Buchwald's treatment and the judge's conclusion that the studio's net profit formula is essentially unfair, the award of $150,000 to Buchwald and $750,000 to his producing partner Alain Bernheim was seen as surprisingly low.
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