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Bernie Brillstein

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BUSINESS
November 21, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since "Wayne's World" became one of the year's surprise movie hits, grossing more than $175 million worldwide, characters from NBC's "Saturday Night Live" have been in hot demand in Hollywood. "The Coneheads," based on the monotone, beer-guzzling space aliens who became TV cult favorites more than a decade ago, begins production in January. "Hans and Franz Go to Hollywood in Search of Arnold" (as in Schwarzenegger) is also on tap, not to mention the inevitable "Wayne's World 2."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
BERNIE Brillstein, who died Thursday at age 77, did a thousand things in show business, but he was one of a kind: agent, manager, producer, executive, raconteur, confidant, great source for lowly reporters in search of a good quote or a great tip. I first met him years ago on the set of a movie that was going down the drain, but you'd hardly know it from Bernie's demeanor. He always had an easy smile, a funny remark and the attitude that whatever was going wrong couldn't possibly spoil his day.
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BOOKS
January 9, 2000 | LYNDA OBST, Lynda Obst, a producer at Paramount Studios, is the author of "Hello, He Lied: And Other Truths from the Hollywood Trenches."
Bernie Brillstein--manager extraordinaire, former studio head and now coauthor of a memoir called "Where Did I Go Right?"--can be arguably said to have reinvented the career of the modern manager. From the most prosaic of beginnings in the William Morris Agency mail room, where he booked early television variety shows, he ultimately transformed himself into a show business entrepreneur.
BOOKS
January 9, 2000 | LYNDA OBST, Lynda Obst, a producer at Paramount Studios, is the author of "Hello, He Lied: And Other Truths from the Hollywood Trenches."
Bernie Brillstein--manager extraordinaire, former studio head and now coauthor of a memoir called "Where Did I Go Right?"--can be arguably said to have reinvented the career of the modern manager. From the most prosaic of beginnings in the William Morris Agency mail room, where he booked early television variety shows, he ultimately transformed himself into a show business entrepreneur.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1988
Bernie Brillstein, chairman and chief executive of Lorimar Film Entertainment, has been elected a director and to the executive committee of Lorimar Telepictures Corp. Brillstein fills the vacancy created by the previously announced resignation of J. Anthony Young as a director.
BOOKS
January 9, 2000
I was going through life As free as a lark, In the world of acting I was making my mark. In Second City, And then on T.V., Not thinking once About the big "C". I saved up my money, An apartment I bought. My wealth was my own, Or so I thought. I can't even tell you How often you cry. When the dreaded "C" Starts draining you dry. Friends try to console, And tell you they care. But deep down you feel That this is unfair.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
Bernie Brillstein is probably still smoking this morning, since the L.A. Free Clinic roast of the agent-producer Friday night was one of the hottest burns in benefit history. The crowd in the ballroom at the Beverly Wilshire almost reached Wilshire Boulevard, as a celebrity-laden record-size crowd (Yes, that room can hold almost 900 people) got together to raise almost $400,000 and celebrate the 20th anniversary of the L.A. Free Clinic.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columbia Pictures, demonstrating a continuing willingness to dole out substantial sums for hot producers in recession-ravaged Hollywood, has made an exclusive production and distribution deal with film and TV producers Bernie Brillstein and Brad Grey.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE
Sometimes it's astonishing how true those old Hollywood maxims turn out to be. Take, for example, the one that says, "I'll never work with you again! (Until I need to.)" Things have a way of going full circle. Just ask producer Bernie Brillstein and Creative Artists Agency founder Michael Ovitz.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
BERNIE Brillstein, who died Thursday at age 77, did a thousand things in show business, but he was one of a kind: agent, manager, producer, executive, raconteur, confidant, great source for lowly reporters in search of a good quote or a great tip. I first met him years ago on the set of a movie that was going down the drain, but you'd hardly know it from Bernie's demeanor. He always had an easy smile, a funny remark and the attitude that whatever was going wrong couldn't possibly spoil his day.
BOOKS
January 9, 2000
I was going through life As free as a lark, In the world of acting I was making my mark. In Second City, And then on T.V., Not thinking once About the big "C". I saved up my money, An apartment I bought. My wealth was my own, Or so I thought. I can't even tell you How often you cry. When the dreaded "C" Starts draining you dry. Friends try to console, And tell you they care. But deep down you feel That this is unfair.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1992 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since "Wayne's World" became one of the year's surprise movie hits, grossing more than $175 million worldwide, characters from NBC's "Saturday Night Live" have been in hot demand in Hollywood. "The Coneheads," based on the monotone, beer-guzzling space aliens who became TV cult favorites more than a decade ago, begins production in January. "Hans and Franz Go to Hollywood in Search of Arnold" (as in Schwarzenegger) is also on tap, not to mention the inevitable "Wayne's World 2."
BUSINESS
January 16, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Columbia Pictures, demonstrating a continuing willingness to dole out substantial sums for hot producers in recession-ravaged Hollywood, has made an exclusive production and distribution deal with film and TV producers Bernie Brillstein and Brad Grey.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE
Sometimes it's astonishing how true those old Hollywood maxims turn out to be. Take, for example, the one that says, "I'll never work with you again! (Until I need to.)" Things have a way of going full circle. Just ask producer Bernie Brillstein and Creative Artists Agency founder Michael Ovitz.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1988
Bernie Brillstein, chairman and chief executive of Lorimar Film Entertainment, has been elected a director and to the executive committee of Lorimar Telepictures Corp. Brillstein fills the vacancy created by the previously announced resignation of J. Anthony Young as a director.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | Marylouise Oates
Bernie Brillstein is probably still smoking this morning, since the L.A. Free Clinic roast of the agent-producer Friday night was one of the hottest burns in benefit history. The crowd in the ballroom at the Beverly Wilshire almost reached Wilshire Boulevard, as a celebrity-laden record-size crowd (Yes, that room can hold almost 900 people) got together to raise almost $400,000 and celebrate the 20th anniversary of the L.A. Free Clinic.
NEWS
January 5, 2000
This Sunday: Melvin Jules Bukiet on "Lieutenant-Colonel De Maumort," a novel by Nobel laureate Roger Martin du Gard; Lynda Obst on Bernie Brillstein; Benjamin Schwarz on John Lukacs' "Five Days in London"; and a page of children's books.
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