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Bernie Richter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is editor and publisher of Inside California, a statewide political newsletter, and Dispatches, a national cultural and media watchdog publication.
By agreeing to share power with a Democratic minority, Republicans in the state Assembly are about to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. Imagine what would have happened if, having won control of the House of Representatives after wandering 40 years in the political wilderness, Newt Gingrich was unable to win the speakership. Imagine, just for a moment, that Rep. Richard Gephardt, the leader of the Democratic minority, had persuaded just enough Republicans to vote for him as Speaker.
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NEWS
October 26, 1999 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bernie Richter, a former Republican assemblyman whose flame-throwing oratory and opposition to affirmative action delighted conservatives and repulsed liberals, died at a Chico hospital Monday. He was 68. Richter, who was turned out of the Assembly by term limits in 1998 but immediately began running for a state Senate seat that will open next year, suffered a heart attack at home and died at Enloe Medical Center about two hours later, said his friend and campaign consultant George Osborn.
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NEWS
May 20, 1996 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By definition, Democratic and Republican members of the California Assembly don't agree on much that is controversial, but they do agree that one silver-thatched presence among them is controversy personified. Both sides can count on Bernie Richter of Chico, a onetime San Fernando Valley farm boy, to stand and deliver as the Republicans' star flame-throwing debater on the lower house floor.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In many ways, the hearing that Assemblyman Bernie Richter held Wednesday in Burbank was similar to those he chaired last week in Sacramento. Affirmative action was again the topic, particularly how the state's public colleges use race and gender in admissions and hiring. And again witnesses were sworn in and asked whether they were on drugs--a query that prompted one educator to confess: "I have Kleenex, a cough drop and I took a Claritan [antihistamine] this morning."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996 | Scott Harris
If you happened to be inside the Burbank City Council chambers Wednesday and heard Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) assert that each and every witness to his committee hearing had been asked if they were under the influence of medication or drugs, I hereby testify that Richter is wrong. I have seen the video. Janine Jacinto wasn't asked that question. But everybody makes mistakes. I made one just the other day. It wasn't that I began a column by asking: "Is Bernie Richter on drugs?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS
If you happened to be inside the Burbank City Council chambers Wednesday morning and heard Assemblyman Bernie Richter assert that each and every witness at his committee hearing had been asked if they were under the influence of medication or drugs, I hereby testify that Richter is wrong. I have seen the video. Janine Jacinto wasn't asked that question. But everybody makes mistakes. I made one just the other day. It wasn't that I began a column by asking: "Is Bernie Richter on drugs?"
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In many ways, the hearing that Assemblyman Bernie Richter held Wednesday in Burbank was similar to those he chaired last week in Sacramento. Affirmative action was again the topic, particularly how the state's public colleges use race and gender in admissions and hiring. And again witnesses were sworn in and asked whether they were on drugs--a query that prompted one educator to confess: "I have Kleenex, a cough drop and I took a Claritan [antihistamine] this morning."
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a debate that involved as much personal histories as civic lessons, state Assembly Speaker Emeritus Willie Brown and Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) argued the merits of the proposed California Civil Rights Initiative on Wednesday evening in Encino.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Community college authorities scrambled Wednesday to check out the complaint of a student who says she was kicked out of an English class at San Bernardino Valley College solely because she is not an African American, the group for whom the class was designed. According to a news release issued by a conservative legal foundation, Janice Camarena said: "I couldn't believe my ears when the English instructor asked me to leave the classroom because I was not black."
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that long-reigning Democratic Speaker Willie Brown is safely out of town, it's payback time for conservative Bernie Richter. Literally. Assemblyman Richter (R-Chico) steered a bill through the lower house last week that seeks to spread around to 42 counties a bonanza of $87 million a year by raiding the tax base of one city--San Francisco. The city by the bay, maintained Richter, has been hogging more than its rightful share of property tax revenues for 17 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS
If you happened to be inside the Burbank City Council chambers Wednesday morning and heard Assemblyman Bernie Richter assert that each and every witness at his committee hearing had been asked if they were under the influence of medication or drugs, I hereby testify that Richter is wrong. I have seen the video. Janine Jacinto wasn't asked that question. But everybody makes mistakes. I made one just the other day. It wasn't that I began a column by asking: "Is Bernie Richter on drugs?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996 | Scott Harris
If you happened to be inside the Burbank City Council chambers Wednesday and heard Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) assert that each and every witness to his committee hearing had been asked if they were under the influence of medication or drugs, I hereby testify that Richter is wrong. I have seen the video. Janine Jacinto wasn't asked that question. But everybody makes mistakes. I made one just the other day. It wasn't that I began a column by asking: "Is Bernie Richter on drugs?"
NEWS
October 23, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Led by Assembly Minority Leader Richard Katz, 25 Democratic lawmakers called Tuesday for Republican Assemblyman Bernie Richter to be censured for his "McCarthy-like tactics" and "disgusting, inexcusable behavior" during last week's hearings on affirmative action in higher education. In a letter to Speaker Curt Pringle, the Democrats said Richter was wrong to ask Cal State Northridge President Blenda J.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even before anyone testified Wednesday, it was clear that Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) wanted his "investigative" hearing on race and gender preferences to be unlike any other. For starters, the first witness, Cal State Northridge President Blenda J. Wilson, was sworn to tell the truth--a formality rarely employed in legislative hearings. Then, in a stunning departure from the norm, Wilson was asked whether she was on drugs.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that long-reigning Democratic Speaker Willie Brown is safely out of town, it's payback time for conservative Bernie Richter. Literally. Assemblyman Richter (R-Chico) steered a bill through the lower house last week that seeks to spread around to 42 counties a bonanza of $87 million a year by raiding the tax base of one city--San Francisco. The city by the bay, maintained Richter, has been hogging more than its rightful share of property tax revenues for 17 years.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By definition, Democratic and Republican members of the California Assembly don't agree on much that is controversial, but they do agree that one silver-thatched presence among them is controversy personified. Both sides can count on Bernie Richter of Chico, a onetime San Fernando Valley farm boy, to stand and deliver as the Republicans' star flame-throwing debater on the lower house floor.
NEWS
October 23, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Led by Assembly Minority Leader Richard Katz, 25 Democratic lawmakers called Tuesday for Republican Assemblyman Bernie Richter to be censured for his "McCarthy-like tactics" and "disgusting, inexcusable behavior" during last week's hearings on affirmative action in higher education. In a letter to Speaker Curt Pringle, the Democrats said Richter was wrong to ask Cal State Northridge President Blenda J.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | GEORGE SKELTON
Long before he was "Crazy Bernie," before he advocated junking affirmative action, before he rolled the dice with Willie Brown, Assemblyman Bernie Richter lived what many Angelenos today would consider a dream life. He grew up in the San Fernando Valley--back before there was a Ventura Freeway, when orange groves and vegetable farms covered the landscape, when clean air was normal, when the nearest neighbor might live a block away. The Richter family farmed 10 acres in idyllic Reseda.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a debate that involved as much personal histories as civic lessons, state Assembly Speaker Emeritus Willie Brown and Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) argued the merits of the proposed California Civil Rights Initiative on Wednesday evening in Encino.
NEWS
March 16, 1995 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Community college authorities scrambled Wednesday to check out the complaint of a student who says she was kicked out of an English class at San Bernardino Valley College solely because she is not an African American, the group for whom the class was designed. According to a news release issued by a conservative legal foundation, Janice Camarena said: "I couldn't believe my ears when the English instructor asked me to leave the classroom because I was not black."
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