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Bethany Hamilton

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Soul Surfer" begins like most other coming-of-age movie dramas. A young heroine, surfer girl Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb), sketches out the details of her sunny life in a quick voice-over. She lives on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, has a loving family and, from the moment she rode her first wave, knew she wanted to be a pro surfer. "It's my passion, my way of life," Bethany says with matter-of-fact conviction. We then see Bethany practicing her passion in the Pacific and next thing you know, she's slipping on a sundress and (wait a minute, what's this?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Soul Surfer" begins like most other coming-of-age movie dramas. A young heroine, surfer girl Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb), sketches out the details of her sunny life in a quick voice-over. She lives on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, has a loving family and, from the moment she rode her first wave, knew she wanted to be a pro surfer. "It's my passion, my way of life," Bethany says with matter-of-fact conviction. We then see Bethany practicing her passion in the Pacific and next thing you know, she's slipping on a sundress and (wait a minute, what's this?
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BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The movie "Soul Surfer," which opens Friday, tells the true story of Hawaiian teen surfing star Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack and overcame huge odds to get back on her surfboard and compete professionally. Hamilton's inspirational tale provided filmmakers a dramatic focal point for their $18-million movie, which was in large part made possible through the visual wizardry of a small Los Angeles effects company that has also managed to beat the odds amid a tough economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2011 | Nicole Sperling
In the opening scene of the new film "Soul Surfer," young Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb) finishes a morning session on the waves off the North Shore of Kauai, Hawaii, quickly throws on a modest sundress over her bikini and hurries to join her family at a beachside church service where the congregation sings a hymn called "Blessed Be Your Name. " The scene succinctly encapsulates the priorities of the film's protagonist, yet it's rare for a Hollywood production to so openly embrace any faith for fear of offending potential audience members who might believe differently.
SPORTS
June 26, 2005 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Bethany Hamilton won't emerge as the women's national amateur champion when winners of Saturday's competition at Lower Trestles are announced at tonight's award banquet. That honor will fall again to Carissa Moore, the 12-year-old prodigy from Honolulu, who followed up last year's triumph in the National Scholastic Surfing Assn.'s prestigious Open division with an even more electrifying performance.
NEWS
June 1, 2004 | Ashley Powers
This girl, the publicist says, "is the most difficult interview to get besides Kobe Bryant after a bad game." "She's more famous than Hilary Duff." "She's the first girl to cross that 15 minutes of fame." * On the surf radar, she was just a perky blond blip with potential. Months before the media swarmed her island of coconut palms and broadcast her tragedy to the mainland, she won a surf competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2011 | Nicole Sperling
In the opening scene of the new film "Soul Surfer," young Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb) finishes a morning session on the waves off the North Shore of Kauai, Hawaii, quickly throws on a modest sundress over her bikini and hurries to join her family at a beachside church service where the congregation sings a hymn called "Blessed Be Your Name. " The scene succinctly encapsulates the priorities of the film's protagonist, yet it's rare for a Hollywood production to so openly embrace any faith for fear of offending potential audience members who might believe differently.
NEWS
November 23, 2003 | Matt Sedensky, Associated Press Writer
She was lying on her surfboard, taking a break after catching some early morning waves, when the gray blur emerged near her left arm as it dangled in the Pacific. Bethany Hamilton was suddenly being jerked back and forth. "I looked down at the red water," she recalled. "Right away, I knew it was a shark and I knew my arm was gone." Bethany, 13, lost more than half her blood and all but four inches of her arm, although those who witnessed the attack say she never screamed or panicked.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
A 13-year-old surfing star had her left arm bitten off by a shark while surfing in clear water Friday morning on Kauai's North Shore, and her best friend's father was credited with saving her life by using a surf leash as a tourniquet. Bethany Hamilton, who has competed in national surfing contests and was expected to go professional, was surfing a quarter-mile off Makua Beach near Haena, in an area known as Tunnels, when the attack occurred about 7:30 a.m.
NEWS
June 8, 2004
Somewhere between the shark's feeding frenzy and the media's, young Bethany Hamilton reacted to an unfortunate, permanent injury with grace and good spirits. Our litigious society, the victim industry and classrooms full of sulking students all suggest to me that we have become a nation of anti-Bethanys. Daniel M.E. Landau West Los Angeles
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The movie "Soul Surfer," which opens Friday, tells the true story of Hawaiian teen surfing star Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack and overcame huge odds to get back on her surfboard and compete professionally. Hamilton's inspirational tale provided filmmakers a dramatic focal point for their $18-million movie, which was in large part made possible through the visual wizardry of a small Los Angeles effects company that has also managed to beat the odds amid a tough economy.
SPORTS
June 26, 2005 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Bethany Hamilton won't emerge as the women's national amateur champion when winners of Saturday's competition at Lower Trestles are announced at tonight's award banquet. That honor will fall again to Carissa Moore, the 12-year-old prodigy from Honolulu, who followed up last year's triumph in the National Scholastic Surfing Assn.'s prestigious Open division with an even more electrifying performance.
NEWS
June 1, 2004 | Ashley Powers
This girl, the publicist says, "is the most difficult interview to get besides Kobe Bryant after a bad game." "She's more famous than Hilary Duff." "She's the first girl to cross that 15 minutes of fame." * On the surf radar, she was just a perky blond blip with potential. Months before the media swarmed her island of coconut palms and broadcast her tragedy to the mainland, she won a surf competition.
NEWS
November 23, 2003 | Matt Sedensky, Associated Press Writer
She was lying on her surfboard, taking a break after catching some early morning waves, when the gray blur emerged near her left arm as it dangled in the Pacific. Bethany Hamilton was suddenly being jerked back and forth. "I looked down at the red water," she recalled. "Right away, I knew it was a shark and I knew my arm was gone." Bethany, 13, lost more than half her blood and all but four inches of her arm, although those who witnessed the attack say she never screamed or panicked.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
A 13-year-old surfing star had her left arm bitten off by a shark while surfing in clear water Friday morning on Kauai's North Shore, and her best friend's father was credited with saving her life by using a surf leash as a tourniquet. Bethany Hamilton, who has competed in national surfing contests and was expected to go professional, was surfing a quarter-mile off Makua Beach near Haena, in an area known as Tunnels, when the attack occurred about 7:30 a.m.
NEWS
June 15, 2004
"Brand Bethany" (June 1) was mean and misguided. Surfer Bethany Hamilton and her family aren't publicity seekers. I've met them. People should look at the message Bethany has managed to get out through all the publicity: Even with a disability, she can still have fun and compete and be inspirational. This is an important message to send to any teenager. Wendy Ledner Hollywood
TRAVEL
November 7, 2010 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times staff writer
If you plan to fly with your favorite board to catch gnarly surf, get ready for a wild ride - financially, that is. Many airlines charge $100 or more each way to take surfboards as checked baggage. A few charge nothing. So check it out before you check it in. And be glad you're not a professional surfer. "It's mind-blowing how expensive it is to travel with surfboards," said Hawaiian pro surfer Fred Patacchia Jr. "I just recently went to Europe on American Airlines and was charged $150 per board, traveling with nine boards.
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