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Bharati Mukherjee

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September 24, 1989 | Richard Eder
"Her level voice delicately but relentlessly brings out the contradictions of a world trying in vain to resist or ignore the passing of its self-confidence."
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November 14, 2004 | Donna Rifkind, Donna Rifkind writes about books for a number of publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and the Baltimore Sun.
For every immigrant's American dream, there is an equally potent yearning for the home left behind. Few writers know this better than Bharati Mukherjee and Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, each having written multiple fictions about American characters of Indian origin who struggle with that twofold longing. Though they are very different kinds of novelists, Mukherjee and Divakaruni share a few identifying details.
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BOOKS
October 10, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
Ideas swim like glittering fishes in "The Holder of the World," but they swim in a muddy and turgid river. Bharati Mukherjee has stocked her new novel, a mock-historical mixture of romance and myth, with interesting notions about East and West, imperialism, the constricted natures and larger possibilities of women and men, and the contrasting kinds of virtual reality achieved by computers and the written word.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bharati Mukherjee is dark-skinned, her eyes and wavy hair black. Her accent is hard to place--cultured, cultivated, of no specific region. She looks and sounds vaguely foreign. But she is an American, as American as apple pie. And her works describe a new kind of pie being put together here. "The new America is pervasive," she is often quoted as saying of people like herself. "We aren't just your doctors and pathologists, your nurses, newspaper vendors and green grocers.
BOOKS
September 17, 1989
Times music critic Martin Bernheimer's thoughts about KFAC do a serious injustice to the station's standards and achievements ("The Life and Times of KFAC," Sept. 3). Bernheimer correctly recalls the pre-1987 KFAC "fragmenting symphonies" and airing "a jingly pitch for a hemorrhoid medication." He is wrong in writing "many of the same irks lingered" under new management.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Mukherjee brings life to an extraordinarily diverse cast of characters: an Italian-American girl nervously presenting her Afghan boyfriend to her family's scrutiny at Thanksgiving; a Vietnam veteran struggling to rebuild his life in the seamy underworld of Florida drug dealers; an Indian widow trying to communicate Eastern concepts of grief and mourning to well-intentioned Westerners.
BOOKS
October 10, 1993 | RICHARD EDER
Ideas swim like glittering fishes in "The Holder of the World," but they swim in a muddy and turgid river. Bharati Mukherjee has stocked her new novel, a mock-historical mixture of romance and myth, with interesting notions about East and West, imperialism, the constricted natures and larger possibilities of women and men, and the contrasting kinds of virtual reality achieved by computers and the written word.
BOOKS
March 10, 1991 | Charles Solomon
A young woman finds herself caught between the repressed attitudes of her past in a Punjabi village and the freedom she enjoys in contemporary America in this handsomely crafted novel by the National Book Critics' Circle Award winner. As a young girl, Jasmine was told by the village astrologer that her horoscope was unlucky: She would bring disaster to any man she wed.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bharati Mukherjee is dark-skinned, her eyes and wavy hair black. Her accent is hard to place--cultured, cultivated, of no specific region. She looks and sounds vaguely foreign. But she is an American, as American as apple pie. And her works describe a new kind of pie being put together here. "The new America is pervasive," she is often quoted as saying of people like herself. "We aren't just your doctors and pathologists, your nurses, newspaper vendors and green grocers.
BOOKS
September 17, 1989
Times music critic Martin Bernheimer's thoughts about KFAC do a serious injustice to the station's standards and achievements ("The Life and Times of KFAC," Sept. 3). Bernheimer correctly recalls the pre-1987 KFAC "fragmenting symphonies" and airing "a jingly pitch for a hemorrhoid medication." He is wrong in writing "many of the same irks lingered" under new management.
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