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Bicycle Master Plan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
When Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa crashed his bike on Venice Boulevard last summer, he did more than bruise his head and shatter his elbow. He became an advocate for the city's bicycling community. After he was jolted off his bike by a turning taxicab, Villaraigosa convened a bicycle summit, launched a safety campaign to educate drivers and threw his support behind the city's first CicLAvia, which closed 71/2 miles of city streets to traffic for most of a day. He also put his clout behind an ambitious bicycle master plan that is expected to be passed Tuesday by the City Council.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
When Los Angeles painted a 1.5-mile strip of Spring Street neon green last year, it was hailed as a major step in the city's effort to have cars and bicycles share the road. But now, the bike lane has become a symbol of how hard it can be to reserve room for cyclists in a city dominated by the car. The green lane has been criticized by the film industry, which frequently uses the stretch of Spring Street, in the heart of old downtown, as a stand-in for other cities and eras.
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NEWS
July 30, 1992 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite pleas not to meddle in quiet residential areas, the Santa Monica City Council on Tuesday voted 5 to 1 to move forward with a pared-down version of a citywide bicycle master plan. City Councilman Herb Katz was the lone dissenter, saying the plan is mediocre and the public is clearly not interested. The proposal should be nipped in the bud, Katz said, rather than taking it to the next step by preparing an environmental impact report.
OPINION
July 22, 2011
L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl says he was inspired to introduce a groundbreaking anti-harassment ordinance for bicyclists after attending a meeting at a local bike shop, where he met a young man whose face had been mangled when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver. "It's about time cyclists had rights; about time they had laws to protect them," Rosendahl says in a YouTube video made to promote his plan. Cyclists already have traffic laws to protect them, but Rosendahl's ordinance, which was approved Wednesday by the City Council, gives them a new way to strike back at drivers who physically assault or threaten to assault them, force them off the road, throw objects at them or otherwise cause injury simply because of their status as cyclists.
OPINION
March 4, 2011
Nobody walks in L.A., as the old Missing Persons song says, but it turns out that they do bike. In fact, pedal-power advocates are enjoying unprecedented clout these days ? and shaking things up at City Hall, as demonstrated this week by the City Council's approval of a bicycle master plan that aims to quadruple the mileage of official bikeways. That may not sound like a big deal, but if the planned bike lanes and neighborhood traffic-calming measures are actually built, it would go a long way toward making L.A. a more livable city and mark one of the most lasting achievements of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday passed a pioneering new law intended to protect bicyclists from harassment by motorists. The ordinance, which backers described as the toughest of its kind in the nation, makes it a crime for drivers to threaten cyclists verbally or physically, and allows victims of harassment to sue in civil court without waiting for the city to press criminal charges. Its passage comes one day after a 63-year-old bicyclist was struck and killed by a car on a downtown street — an incident that bicycle advocates say underscores the dangers cyclists face.
OPINION
July 19, 2008
Re "Stop! Yield!" editorial, July 12 California Vehicle Code 21200 states, "Every person riding a bicycle upon a highway has all the rights and is subject to all the provisions applicable to the driver of a vehicle." Recently, I was at an intersection with several cars stopped at each stop sign. A group of seven cyclists came through the intersection, and not one of them stopped at the stop sign. They sailed through at full speed. A few blocks later, I was driving on a six-lane road.
OPINION
July 22, 2011
L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl says he was inspired to introduce a groundbreaking anti-harassment ordinance for bicyclists after attending a meeting at a local bike shop, where he met a young man whose face had been mangled when he was struck by a hit-and-run driver. "It's about time cyclists had rights; about time they had laws to protect them," Rosendahl says in a YouTube video made to promote his plan. Cyclists already have traffic laws to protect them, but Rosendahl's ordinance, which was approved Wednesday by the City Council, gives them a new way to strike back at drivers who physically assault or threaten to assault them, force them off the road, throw objects at them or otherwise cause injury simply because of their status as cyclists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
When Los Angeles painted a 1.5-mile strip of Spring Street neon green last year, it was hailed as a major step in the city's effort to have cars and bicycles share the road. But now, the bike lane has become a symbol of how hard it can be to reserve room for cyclists in a city dominated by the car. The green lane has been criticized by the film industry, which frequently uses the stretch of Spring Street, in the heart of old downtown, as a stand-in for other cities and eras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2001
The City Council is seeking avid bicyclists for two spots on its Bicycle Master Plan Development Committee. The committee is being created to develop a master plan that connects trails and roadways for bicyclists--both recreational riders and commuters. Currently, the city has no designated trail system except a six-mile stretch along the Arroyo Simi flood control channel, city Traffic Engineer Ron Fuchiwaki said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday passed a pioneering new law intended to protect bicyclists from harassment by motorists. The ordinance, which backers described as the toughest of its kind in the nation, makes it a crime for drivers to threaten cyclists verbally or physically, and allows victims of harassment to sue in civil court without waiting for the city to press criminal charges. Its passage comes one day after a 63-year-old bicyclist was struck and killed by a car on a downtown street — an incident that bicycle advocates say underscores the dangers cyclists face.
OPINION
March 4, 2011
Nobody walks in L.A., as the old Missing Persons song says, but it turns out that they do bike. In fact, pedal-power advocates are enjoying unprecedented clout these days ? and shaking things up at City Hall, as demonstrated this week by the City Council's approval of a bicycle master plan that aims to quadruple the mileage of official bikeways. That may not sound like a big deal, but if the planned bike lanes and neighborhood traffic-calming measures are actually built, it would go a long way toward making L.A. a more livable city and mark one of the most lasting achievements of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
When Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa crashed his bike on Venice Boulevard last summer, he did more than bruise his head and shatter his elbow. He became an advocate for the city's bicycling community. After he was jolted off his bike by a turning taxicab, Villaraigosa convened a bicycle summit, launched a safety campaign to educate drivers and threw his support behind the city's first CicLAvia, which closed 71/2 miles of city streets to traffic for most of a day. He also put his clout behind an ambitious bicycle master plan that is expected to be passed Tuesday by the City Council.
OPINION
July 19, 2008
Re "Stop! Yield!" editorial, July 12 California Vehicle Code 21200 states, "Every person riding a bicycle upon a highway has all the rights and is subject to all the provisions applicable to the driver of a vehicle." Recently, I was at an intersection with several cars stopped at each stop sign. A group of seven cyclists came through the intersection, and not one of them stopped at the stop sign. They sailed through at full speed. A few blocks later, I was driving on a six-lane road.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite pleas not to meddle in quiet residential areas, the Santa Monica City Council on Tuesday voted 5 to 1 to move forward with a pared-down version of a citywide bicycle master plan. City Councilman Herb Katz was the lone dissenter, saying the plan is mediocre and the public is clearly not interested. The proposal should be nipped in the bud, Katz said, rather than taking it to the next step by preparing an environmental impact report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Calabasas city officials will sponsor a workshop on wheels Saturday with a community bike ride around the city to gather input from residents about the best way to promote bicycle use and expand the city's cycling facilities. Participants will meet at 9 a.m. at the Calabasas Swim and Tennis Center, 23400 Park Sorrento, before starting on a bike ride led by the Lost Hills Sheriff's Station's Bike Team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
The Calabasas City Council has hired a consultant to design a regional bicycle trail stretching from the city of Los Angeles to the Ventura County line. DKS Associates will be paid $305,000 to provide plans, specifications and estimates for construction of the trail, which would run roughly parallel to the Ventura Freeway, city officials said. The contract will include creation of a bicycle master plan for Calabasas.
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