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Bicycle Racing

SPORTS
September 13, 1998 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the rear seat on a two-man racing bicycle, Casey Cook should be able to capture life's streaking images and frame them in his mind. While pedaling arduously over country roads, he should be able to absorb nature's tapestry during workouts and competitions. Most cyclists do. But not Cook, 26, who is blind and deaf. "I've been an athlete all of my life," Cook said. "Cycling is a new frontier for me." Cook, a Ventura resident, is expanding the frontier to Colorado Springs, Colo.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1998 | JASON TAKENOUCHI
Arms outstretched and smiling after a grueling 37-mile race, bicyclist Norm Carter celebrated his victory in the Ventura Cycling Classic, a high-speed competition that packed downtown Ventura on Sunday morning. Carter, 22, won the 50-lap race in just under 90 minutes, pacing a field of about 60 amateur bicyclists from across the nation. After leading the race in the first few laps and then falling into the pack, Carter made a dramatic comeback in the last third of the race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1998 | JENNIFER KNIGHT
Primed for a fast and frenzied race, as many as 100 cyclists Sunday will speed around a rectangular course through the streets of downtown Ventura. "We're hoping to bring bike racing to the community," said Tren Morris, 31, assistant manager of Open Air Bicycles in Ventura, one of the race's sponsors. Known as the Ventura Classic, the event will become annual if Sunday's races are successful, Morris said. The first race, designed for licensed competitors 35 and older, begins at 8 a.m.
SPORTS
August 22, 1998 | NICOLE VARGAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1984, the Olympic Velodrome at Cal State Dominguez Hills was the site of the highest level of track cycling competition in the world. The one-third-kilometer oval, surrounded by 8,000 seats, showcased America's Olympic track cyclists, including gold medalists Mark Gorski and Steve Hegg. That legacy came close to becoming a memory when the Cal State Dominguez Hills Foundation decided the arena and track on the northwest side of the campus should be closed.
SPORTS
August 3, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On an afternoon fittingly darkened by rainclouds and a downpour, the Tour de France finally crossed the finish line Sunday, bringing to a close the most sordid and controversial year in the classic bicycle race's history. Sullied by ongoing French police investigations into the use of performance-enhancing drugs by riders, the Tour, and professional cycling in general, now must face the immediate and immense challenge of cleaning up its act and image.
SPORTS
July 31, 1998 | From Associated Press
After one of the most turbulent days in its history, the scandal-plagued Tour de France escaped Thursday to Switzerland, where fans clanged cowbells along the route and officials promised there wouldn't be any late-night drug raids. But despite the bucolic surroundings, the widening doping scandal continued to claim new victims in the world's biggest cycling event.
SPORTS
July 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Tour de France drug scandal widened Monday, with five cyclists admitting they took banned substances and two leaders of a Dutch team facing legal questioning. Officials remained steadfast in rejecting calls for canceling the event. "There is no question of stopping the Tour," Tour director Jean-Marie Leblanc told the French newspaper Liberation.
SPORTS
July 25, 1998
Two riders have broken out in front a little more than 30 hours into the the Race Across America bicycle race. Gerry Tatrai of Australia held the overall lead at the ninth time station, in Cutter, Ariz. He passed through the town, which is 557 miles into the 2,900-mile race, at 5:40 p.m. Friday. Seana Hogan of San Jose remained in second but was 1 hour six minutes back. She was 12 minutes off the lead near the end of the first day.
SPORTS
July 23, 1998 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seana Hogan is the only woman entered in the Race Across America, but don't for a minute think she won't have competition in this torturous transcontinental bicycle race. Once again, Hogan will be challenging the men when the 17th edition of RAAM rolls out of Irvine today on the way to Savannah, Ga., 2,906 miles to the east. Hogan, the women's division winner in five of the last six nation-spanning races, is hoping to become the first overall winner who happens to be female.
SPORTS
July 23, 1998 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tustin's Lubomir Hristov is qualified to join the solo riders leaving Irvine today in the Race Across America, but you won't find him lined up at the start. He would like to be there, ready to try ultramarathon cycling's ultimate test, riding 2,906 miles to Savannah, Ga., but he cannot spare the time to train enough to prepare for such a challenge. And Hristov tries to ride about 400 miles a week. "To do RAAM," Hristov said, "I would think that would be grossly inadequate."
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