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Big Daddy

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
One of the great left-field surprises of the 1980s pop music scene came with the arrival of Big Daddy, a whimsical band that reimagined hits of the day as they might have sounded had they been recorded in the 1950s. The conceit was that the group's members had been lost in a southeast Asian jungle for a couple of decades and had just found their way back to civilization, their passion for rock 'n' roll, as well as their musical vocabulary, unaltered a generation later. More than a gimmick, Big Daddy created new takes on pop and rock songs that were consistently inspired, illuminating and often hilarious.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
North Korea appears to be missing in an image taken from space. NASA says of the nighttime image, taken from the International Space Station: "North Korea is almost completely dark compared to neighboring South Korea and China. The darkened land appears as if it were a patch of water joining the Yellow Sea to the Sea of Japan. " Capital city Pyongyang has a population of more than 3 million, yet is a tiny island of light. The dictator-ruled nation is in the dark in more ways than one. Electricity is sporadic and unreliable, with those who have it often receiving power only a few hours a day, according to U.S. News & World Report.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM
. 1/2 Mercury. Half of "Big Daddy" is wonderful, and the other half is at least yeomanly. Not bad, all in all, for a rocker once rightly thought by many critics to be as flat and vacant as his native Indiana landscape. The wonderful half revolves around a mid-life crisis of sorts, wherein Mellencamp looks inward and begins to question the cost of chasing one's dreams. After living in single-minded pursuit of their goals and desires, the characters in songs such as "Big Daddy," "To Live" and "Mansion in Heaven" find themselves confused and burdened with self-reproach.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
In these IM and text-happy days, it's likely more people know what the letters OMG stand for than the meaning of GMO. But if filmmaker Jeremy Seifert has his way, that may change as a result of his lively, thought-provoking documentary "GMO OMG," which surveys the controversial, unreconciled presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in most of our non-organic foods. It's a complex issue that writer-director Seifert attacks in a largely personal, loosey-goosey way. While the movie rarely feels like the definitive, well-honed dissection this critical subject demands, his lighter approach keeps a somewhat arcane topic more easily digestible, dare say entertaining.
NEWS
December 21, 1995 | GEORGE SKELTON
Three decades ago, a thin young man wearing a briefly fashionable Nehru jacket and a very wide grin showed up in the back row of the Assembly chamber. "Who's that?" a reporter asked. "That's the guy who beat Eddie Gaffney," I said. Edward M. Gaffney, 78, a former Shakespearean actor first elected to the Assembly from San Francisco in 1940, was a sweet gentleman best known for two things. Each March, he'd put on a green derby and lead the Assembly in celebrating St. Patrick's Day.
OPINION
March 14, 2005
Your article on "Big Daddy," the bull elk that was poached near Big Valley Springs (Column One, Feb. 8) was reprinted in the Anchorage Daily News recently. As a wildlife biologist of over 25 years who has studied elk extensively, I wish to comment on the closing thought in this article -- now that "Big Daddy" is gone, the elk may not return. This notion, plus a couple of earlier references to this bull's relationship with a group of cows and young bulls, suggest that adult bull elks "lead" and play an important role in determining what elk groups do. This idea is incorrect.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1985 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Bob Wayne, leader of the L.A.-based group Big Daddy, is ready to junk the Laos story. Big Daddy, the story goes, was on a USO tour in Laos in 1959 when it was captured by communists, who held the eight musicians prisoner for 24 years. When it returned to the States to continue its career in 1983, the band naturally looked for current hits to perform. And, naturally, they performed them in the only style they knew: 1950s rock 'n' roll.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1999 | CLAUDIA ELLER
For Sony-owned Columbia Pictures, the weekend's stupendous opening of the Adam Sandler comedy "Big Daddy" at $41.5 million is the first piece of box-office business the studio brass has had a genuine reason to brag about in a long time. The movie, which cost $34.
NEWS
May 2, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Eric (Big Daddy) Nord, a 6-foot, 8-inch bear of a man who was forced by a lack of paint to title his avant-garde nightclub the hungry i, has died in San Jose at the age of 68, it was reported over the weekend. United Press International said that Nord, who died in a convalescent home of ailments resulting from his weight of 400 pounds and who was credited with helping establish the "beat movement" in both Northern and Southern California cafes in the 1950s, died Wednesday. The bearded Nord, who prowled San Francisco's North Beach and Los Angeles' Venice beach in old sea captain's hats, using a giant tricycle for transportation, operated a series of coffeehouses and clubs during the colorful and controversial years that beatniks dominated the cultural scene.
SPORTS
April 24, 1997 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ
Since he started coaching men's volleyball at Pierce College in 1976, Ken Stanley has captured his share of glory, guiding the Brahmas to state titles in 1986, 1988 and 1992. But Tuesday, Stanley hit a low. In the championship match of the Southern California regional, the Brahmas won the first two games but blew a 12-8 lead in the third and a 13-11 advantage in the fourth, and lost to host Orange Coast in five games.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
One of the great left-field surprises of the 1980s pop music scene came with the arrival of Big Daddy, a whimsical band that reimagined hits of the day as they might have sounded had they been recorded in the 1950s. The conceit was that the group's members had been lost in a southeast Asian jungle for a couple of decades and had just found their way back to civilization, their passion for rock 'n' roll, as well as their musical vocabulary, unaltered a generation later. More than a gimmick, Big Daddy created new takes on pop and rock songs that were consistently inspired, illuminating and often hilarious.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
In the den of Darryl Roth's Corona home, cartoon ogres cover the walls, staring back at him with salivating tongues, bloodshot eyes, jagged claws and gnashing teeth. To Roth, the images represent rebellion, a gloriously grotesque imagination — and his father. "I look around and I swear, it's like he's still alive. He's still here," Roth said. He's the youngest son of iconic hot rod artist Ed "Big Daddy" Roth, and this year marked the 10th anniversary of his father's passing. "Even now," said the son, "I'm blown away by him. " Between the late 1950s and the mid-1960s, Ed Roth was what famed journalist Tom Wolfe described as the Salvador Dali of the hot rod world.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Kick-Ass" is the movie our parents warned us about, the movie you don't want your children to see. A highly seductive enterprise that's equal parts disturbing and enticing, it will leave you speechless because its characters — especially a 12-year-old virtuoso of violence named Hit Girl — are anything but. This shrewd mixture of slick comic-book mayhem, unmistakable sweetness and ear-splitting profanity is poised to be a popular culture...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2009 | Charlotte Stoudt
Blanche DuBois depended on the kindness of strangers; in "Tennessee Williams UnScripted," her creator does too. Impro Group is extending its run of improvised plays in the style of the Southern Gothic dramatist. Each performance is a completely different show, sparked by audience members suggesting a month of the year and an animal. One recent Saturday at Theatre Asylum, "February" and "polar bear" inspired a fevered saga about two families connected by lust and property. (This is the South, after all.)
BOOKS
November 18, 2007 | Peter Schrag, Peter Schrag, a columnist and former editorial page editor of the Sacramento Bee, is the author, most recently, of "California: America's High Stakes Experiment."
It's been a long time since Jesse M. "Big Daddy" Unruh was a household name in California politics. Unruh was, as the cliche goes, "the powerful speaker" of the state Assembly from 1961 to 1969, candidate for governor in 1970 -- he lost to then-Gov. Ronald Reagan by 500,000 votes -- and state treasurer from 1975 until his death in 1987. So why would anyone want to write Unruh's biography now?
FOOD
June 20, 2007 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
IN summertime, a barbecuer's heart lightly turns to creating -- or stealing; who cares? -- dynamite grill recipes. That's why we have barbecue books. The current crop shows the magnificent vitality of the American 'cue scene (translation: there are some wacky backyard grillers and barbecue contest entrants out there).
SPORTS
September 21, 2001 | SHAV GLICK
The National Hot Rod Assn.'s 50th-anniversary list of its top 50 drivers is down to the final 10. For months, drag racing fans have speculated over who would be No. 1, Don Garlits or John Force, or perhaps Kenny Bernstein or Don Prudhomme. Or maybe the women's choice, Shirley Muldowney, back to be being called Cha Cha again. Curiously, in drivers 11 through 50, there is a not a single full-time competitive contemporary driver named from the professional categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1990 | MICHAEL KUCHWARA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Yes, Kathleen Turner is a tough, sexy and even funny Maggie in the respectable, occasionally riveting, revival of "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" that opened Wednesday at Broadway's Eugene O'Neill Theater. But the heart of Tennessee Williams' Southern-fried Gothic melodrama belongs to Big Daddy, the dying patriarch of "28,000 acres of the richest land this side of the valley Nile."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Director Ron Mann's new documentary, "Tales of the Rat Fink," is an entertaining but disappointingly superficial portrait of the pioneering car customizer Ed "Big Daddy" Roth. As with his previous films "Comic Book Confidential" and "Grass," Mann strikes upon a cool and interesting subject with a certain approved countercultural appeal, presents it as such and never much moves beyond that to get to its heart. An unrepentant slob with a Maynard G.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2006 | Susan King
Laurence Olivier Presents (Acorn Media, $50) THOUGH the legendary British actor is best known for his stage and film work, Olivier, who died in 1989 at age 82, also made his mark on television. He won five Emmy Awards for his work in such prestigious projects as "Love Among the Ruins," "Long Day's Journey Into Night" and "Brideshead Revisited." During the 1970s, England's Granada Television teamed up with Olivier for a series of adaptations of award-winning plays.
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