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Big Green Initiative

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1990 | JOANNA MILLER
Local environmental activists turned in petitions Thursday that they said contained 8,225 signatures in support of the so-called "Big Green" initiative, which they are trying to qualify for the November state ballot.
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BUSINESS
November 8, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's business community claimed a decisive victory Wednesday as almost every ballot proposition on its hit list was defeated and Republican Sen. Pete Wilson headed for the governor's mansion. But there was anger--at the initiative process, over the estimated $57 million spent on it and the time devoted to it. Despite business wins over the "Big Green" and "Forests Forever" environmental initiatives and a move to boost alcohol taxes, doubts remained about voters' views of industry.
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NEWS
April 23, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dianne Feinstein used the Earth Day stage to proclaim her support of the so-called "Big Green" environmental protection initiative co-sponsored by her rival, Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp. Feinstein's announcement, during remarks at a Santa Monica beach celebration and later at Exposition Park, was an abrupt departure from her longstanding refusal to announce her position on the initiative until it qualified for the ballot.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hired guns who orchestrated the defeat of several key ballot initiatives shared in the glory Wednesday as California's business community won major victories in Tuesday's elections. The main winner was Woodward & McDowell, a political consulting firm in Burlingame that engineered the overwhelming defeat of Proposition 128, the "Big Green" initiative that sought to cleanse the environment of cancer-causing chemicals and pesticides.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's called "Big Green" and it's the most sweeping environmental initiative ever proposed in California. If it qualifies for the November ballot, Californians will be making decisions on everything from saving ancient redwood forests and blocking offshore oil development to slowing global warming and outlawing cancer-causing pesticides in food. And they would also be creating a new elective post of state environmental czar to enforce their will. That's just for starters.
OPINION
October 7, 1990 | Marc Lappe, Marc Lappe is a professor of Health Policy and Ethics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. From 1976-77 he ran the Office of Health, Law and Values; from 1977-78 the Planning and Evaluation division; and from 1979-81 he organized and ran the Hazard Evaluation System for the State of California's Department of Health Services. He is the author of the book, "Chemical Deception: Exploding Ten Myths about Toxic Substances" due out next year from Sierra Club Books
At first blush, I can understand why people in other states often dismiss California's "Big Green" initiative that purports to be "healthier for the State." California's health statistics put a state like Illinois to shame. On average, California children do better than those from at least 45 other states: they're born heavier, survive their first year in greater numbers and live longer than almost all the rest.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a fall election campaign where Democratic incumbents are heavy favorites to win reelection to every Westside legislative seat, only one lawmaker has drawn heavy fire--Assemblyman Tom Hayden. The barrage against the Santa Monica Democrat has come not from his under-financed Republican challenger in the Assembly race, but from some of the state's biggest industries. They are determined to stop the sweeping environmental protection initiative dubbed "Big Green," which Hayden helped draft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new poll of Orange County voters shows that they favor Proposition 128, the Big Green initiative, by more than a 2-to-1 margin, a much broader base of support than among voters statewide. Mark Baldassare, a UC Irvine professor of social ecology who authored the survey, said that 58% of Orange County voters said they would vote for Proposition 128, 27% said they opposed it and 15% were undecided.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed pesticide crackdown in California's "Big Green" ballot initiative would decimate the state's agricultural industry, reducing crop yields and eliminating thousands of jobs, spokesmen for agricultural interests told the U.S. International Trade Commission on Tuesday. The unremittingly gloomy picture was painted by a daylong procession of witnesses representing growers, processors and the chemical industry as the commission began preparations to write a report for U.S.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | Elements of the ad, with an analysis by Times environmental writer Maura Dolan
The initiative: Proposition 128, a November ballot measure sponsored by the Sierra Club, the League of Conservation Voters, Natural Resources Defense Council, Pesticide Watch, the National Toxics Campaign, Campaign California, Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp, Assemblyman Lloyd Connelly (D-Sacramento) and Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica). Whose ad? Yes on Prop. 128-Big Green, a committee composed of the above groups.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | MAURA DOLAN and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Environmental groups, stung by defeat and fearing a loss of momentum, said Wednesday they misstepped by asking voters to approve an overly broad measure in Proposition 128 but pledged to return with narrowly focused initiatives if state officials fail to heed their demands. "It is clear that the public sent the environmental community a message," said Carl Pope, conservation director of the Sierra Club.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER and BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITERS
Democrat Dianne Feinstein and Republican U.S. Senator Pete Wilson were locked in a tight battle for the governorship early today after a historic campaign that saw Feinstein driving to become the first woman governor in California. Early absentee returns gave Wilson a slim lead, but exit polls, including one by The Times, showed the race too close to call. Ultimately, the outcome may be determined by as many as 500,000 absentee ballots that election officials will not begin to count until today.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning defeat for environmentalists, voters Tuesday overwhelmingly rejected Proposition 128, the sweeping "Big Green" initiative that sought to rid the state of cancer-causing pesticides and cure a variety of other environmental ills. Backers of the initiative conceded defeat shortly after 11 p.m., charging that the opposition campaign financed largely by chemical and oil companies had succeeded in confusing the voters.
NEWS
November 6, 1990 | ROBERT A. JONES
A heavy day. Never have so many had so much at stake in a single California election. We will decide the fate of the redwoods and the longevity of every legislator in Sacramento. We will raise our taxes by billions of dollars or maybe we won't. We will deal with the ozone layer. And, oh yeah, we will elect a governor. You can make an impressive list of the Big Foot lobby groups that will win big or lose big today. Chevron, DuPont and the petrochemicals. All of agribusiness.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as he sought to wrap himself in the mantle of the state's environmental movement, President Bush announced Saturday that he is opposed to Proposition 128, the "Big Green" environmental proposition on the California ballot. Moments after the President said at a rally for Sen. Pete Wilson's gubernatorial campaign that the initiative was not needed to protect the environment, his chief environmental adviser sidestepped an opportunity to join Bush in opposing the measure.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Proposition 128 campaign began airing a gut-wrenching television commercial Wednesday that features two cancer victims, one of them a bald, 4-year-old girl who tells viewers, "I can't vote but you can." Backers of the environmental initiative hope the emotional appeal from actress Tracy Nelson, who stars in television's "Father Dowling's Mysteries," and little Colette Chuda will provide the boost they need to win the election Tuesday. "I had cancer three years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1990 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Both Propositions 128 and 135, the competing environmental initiatives on the November ballot, are struggling to capture a majority among Orange County voters, but two measures that would limit state legislators' terms are leading by wide margins, a Times Orange County Poll shows.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In a 30-second sales pitch beamed into the living rooms of California voters, John K. Van de Kamp gazes over a panoramic view of the golden state: Parklands. Waterfalls. The Big Sur coast. "He's sponsoring Big Green--the environmental initiative to protect our coastline and outlaw cancer-causing pesticides," intones the campaign ad's unseen announcer.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little-known provision of the sweeping Big Green initiative could force Orange County to double the sewer bills of most residents and spend $1.4 billion to improve its system for treating waste before it is pumped into the ocean. As a result, most city and county officials in Orange County oppose the statewide environmental initiative on the Nov.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Actor Clint Eastwood rode back into politics Tuesday to take on the timber industry. The former mayor of Carmel and longtime conservative Republican joined forces with environmentalists to cut a television commercial promoting Proposition 130, the "Forests Forever" initiative that would halt clear-cutting in California's forests. "Let's save the ancient redwoods," the actor says as he sits in a chair holding a copy of the ballot pamphlet.
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