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OPINION
December 1, 2011
When it comes to school lunches, federal officials apparently can't see the pizza for the tomato paste. A congressional vote that slightly affected the nutritional content of federally subsidized lunches has prompted cries of outrage because it blocked two proposals by the Obama administration. The whole brouhaha led to silly accusations that the federal government will now count pizza as a vegetable. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, as part of a laudable effort to boost the nutritional quality of school lunches served free or at reduced cost to 31 million children, sought to limit the times children were served potatoes to two per week, and to define a serving of tomato paste as a half-cup.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa ? A British soldier dozes on a military flight to Helmand province, Afghanistan, beside him an ordinary brown box, like a mail parcel. It contains a fat roll of photographic paper belonging to two artists and photographers, Oliver Chanarin and Adam Broomberg, who are "embedded" with the British forces in 2008 ? traveling with the military as a photographer, camera operator or journalist, on its terms. "We decided the only way we could be subversive in this situation was to not take photographs," Chanarin recounts.
SPORTS
January 27, 2011 | By Mike Bresnahan
Month by month, Phil Jackson's departure from the Lakers draws closer and closer. One particular player is finding a way to turn it into a positive. Kobe Bryant doesn't need any added motivation, but he acknowledges the importance of winning one more championship under Jackson. "Yeah, for me especially because we've been together for so long," Bryant said. "I'm going to make sure I do everything in my power to send him off in the right way. " Jackson, 65, reiterated Thursday that he would be done coaching after this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
From the beginning, which is to say Charles Dickens, stories revolving around the lives of children and adolescents often shared a similar theme. Facing adversity, most often in the form of poverty and/or dead parents, children banded together to create surrogate families of great resourcefulness and loyalty. In the old days, these situations were usually temporary ?- at some point a benevolent (and rich) adult stepped in ? Oliver and "The Little Princess" were adopted, the five little Peppers and the March girls attracted the beneficence of wealthy neighbors.
SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | By Mike Bresnahan
Kobe Bryant was back, without a limp. So was Andrew Bynum, though he returned with a frown. The Lakers, an injured but successful bunch when last seen on a basketball court, returned to practice Monday with some promising health updates outweighing the negative ones. Bryant practiced Monday after spending All-Star weekend in Dallas, where the extent of his activities was making promotional appearances and passing the ball to Shannon Brown in the dunk contest. He will play Tuesday against Golden State, Bryant's first game since aggravating a sprained ankle Feb. 5. He did not talk to reporters Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Associated Press
Bruce Conner's photo montage of a nuclear mushroom cloud wearing a military suit is a critique on nuclear production. Martin Ramirez used paper bags and other available materials to create drawings with cutout pictures, possibly to hold onto aspects of a fractured identity. Joseph Cornell was influenced by French symbolists and Gestalt psychologists, who compiled poetic fragments to alter emphasis and meaning, when he made his collage and boxed assemblage.
OPINION
July 13, 2008 | Charlotte Allen, Charlotte Allen is a contributing editor of the Manhattan Institute's Minding the Campus website.
I'm a conservative, and I just love the movie "Wall-E." That makes me an outcast among many of my fellow conservatives who have judged Pixar's post-apocalyptic cartoon about a trash-compacting robot to be a carbon-phobic, Al Gore-worshiping, global-warming panic-mongering assault on capitalism, President Bush and U.S. prosperity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
"The concept of the interview is endlessly interesting to me," Errol Morris said with a wistful smile. The filmmaker tapped his fingertips together. "I have given interviews a lot of thought through the years, and I still think about them quite a lot. In a real sense they are a basic human relationship. But an interview is also an artificial frame, a focus, and that, well, that's even more interesting."
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