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Bike Riders

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2011 | By Maria Hsin, Los Angeles Times
Burbank police say they're concerned about an increase in the number of bicycle accidents over the last two years. Through October of this year, police have responded to 32 injury bike collisions — more than in all of 2007, when there were 24, and nearly as many as the 33 reported in 2008, Lt. J.J. Puglisi said. Based on the number of complaints from the public, police are worried that the rise is in part a result of cyclist behavior, such as running red lights. "I hear a lot of complaints from the community at large about the behavior they observe of people biking," Puglisi said, adding that, combined with a lack of awareness by motorists, the mix can be volatile.
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NEWS
September 29, 2013 | By Nicholas Goldberg
When I ride each weekend from my house to Griffith Park, I tend to ride, like most bicyclists, on the right side of the street, next to the parked cars, allowing traffic to pass me on the left. But is that really what I'm supposed to do, or am I supposed to ride in the middle of the lane, with cars behind me and in front of me? And if I want to make a left turn, how am I supposed to get from the right lane to the left-turn lane -- at what speed and where am I supposed to cross the rest of the traffic?
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By Robert Greene
What do 200 or so bicycle advocates from all corners of California do over the course of a four-day summit in Oakland? Well, they ride, of course. They ride around Lake Merritt (on its new green super-sharrow bike path), into the hills and across a stretch of the new Bay Bridge -- but only part of the way, because much of the bridge doesn't accommodate cyclists. Yet. They're working on it. But they also talk -- about what they have accomplished, what they want to do next and how they want to do it. No doubt most people at the California by Bike summit who took part in the many conversations went home with mental lists of lessons learned, but as one of the few non-cyclists listening in, I have my own set of takeaways.
SPORTS
July 5, 1996 | RENE GARCIA
As most stationary bike riders prepare to go on yet another boring journey, they may bring along a book or newspaper to help time pass. Watching the clock is common during lonely exercise sessions that can be very monotonous. Well, stop the pedals! Now there's an exciting new way to burn calories and get fit by pedaling. It's called studio cycling and it combines the cardio-pumping energy of a bike race and the Zen philosophy of meditation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2000 | TED ROHRLICH and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The phone call that woke Judy Miller in the middle of the night was every parent's bad dream. As she fumbled for the receiver, she heard a "little metallic voice" announce that it was a collect call from a jail inmate. Then she heard the voice of her 20-year-old son Kevin, a student leader at Cal State Monterey Bay. He said his name, then the computer voice came on again, telling her to press zero to accept charges. In her haste, she hit the wrong key and cut off the call.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | SUE REILLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Soft Pedaling Ecology These days when people talk about conservation and ecology, they usually say something such as, "I'm saving water and recycling, but I'm not riding my bike to work or anything." The disclaimer is meant to show that although these people are in favor of doing what's expected, they aren't raving-green nut cases or anything.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buying into the hype over Bike to Work Day, and ever willing to challenge the notion that you can't get around in Los Angeles without a car, I left my Ford curbside Thursday. I would bike and train the 28 miles from my home in Long Beach to downtown Los Angeles. I can't remember the last time I rode my oversize 12-speed, which I bought used in the mid-1980s.
OPINION
July 12, 1992
What is the deal with you people? Do you think that all death and injury can be legislated away? All the laws in the world cannot prevent people from getting injured or killed. If a person wishes to protect his or her children, that is wonderful, but don't involve the government. It is not the function of the government to raise the children of America. MARK KING Redondo Beach
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