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Bil Keane

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Bil Keane, a cartoonist who chronicled the lighter moments of family life for more than 50 years through the gentle, heartfelt humor of the "Family Circus" comic strip, has died. He was 89. Keane died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his longtime home in Paradise Valley, Ariz., according to King Features Syndicate, which distributes the daily comic. The first cartoon appeared in 19 newspapers on Feb. 29, 1960. It is a drawing of a census taker who inquires of a puzzled woman surrounded by a roomful of toys: "Any children?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Bil Keane, a cartoonist who chronicled the lighter moments of family life for more than 50 years through the gentle, heartfelt humor of the "Family Circus" comic strip, has died. He was 89. Keane died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his longtime home in Paradise Valley, Ariz., according to King Features Syndicate, which distributes the daily comic. The first cartoon appeared in 19 newspapers on Feb. 29, 1960. It is a drawing of a census taker who inquires of a puzzled woman surrounded by a roomful of toys: "Any children?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thelma Keane, 82, the inspiration for the Mommy character in the long-running comic strip "Family Circus" created by her husband, Bil Keane, died Friday of Alzheimer's disease in Paradise Valley, Ariz. A native of Australia, she met her future husband during World War II while working as an accounting secretary. Keane was working next to her as a promotional artist for the U.S. Army. The two married in 1948 and moved to Keane's hometown of Philadelphia. They had five children and moved to the Phoenix suburb of Paradise Valley in 1958.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thelma Keane, 82, the inspiration for the Mommy character in the long-running comic strip "Family Circus" created by her husband, Bil Keane, died Friday of Alzheimer's disease in Paradise Valley, Ariz. A native of Australia, she met her future husband during World War II while working as an accounting secretary. Keane was working next to her as a promotional artist for the U.S. Army. The two married in 1948 and moved to Keane's hometown of Philadelphia. They had five children and moved to the Phoenix suburb of Paradise Valley in 1958.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
The first cartoon appeared in 19 newspapers on Feb. 29, 1960. It was a drawing of a census taker filling out a form and asking the woman of the house: "Any children?" The woman looks puzzled. Two dirty handprints of a child ring the doorknob. Assorted toys, a tricycle, volleyball, baseball and bat litter the floor and sofa. Three decades later, cartoonist Bil Keane, 67, continues to chronicle the lighter moments of American family life. But today, many more families share those moments.
NEWS
October 20, 1985
Re Bil Keane's "The Family Circus" cartoon of Oct. 15 (captioned, "This (evening) is the bestest time of day. Dinners are Cookin', kids are bathed and daddys come home.") This is an insult to the working mothers and women you serve. CELLA MOREY Venice
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
The rest of the world knew him, rather formally, as Charles M. Schulz. But to his many friends, the late creator of Charlie Brown and Snoopy was simply "Sparky." Those friends, many of them fellow cartoonists, celebrated Sparky's 50 years in the funnies business Saturday by running Schulz-themed cartoons in the nation's newspapers. More than 80 strips--everything from "Alley Oop" to "Ziggy"--paid homage to "Peanuts."
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Once again the homeless are finding shelter on the comics page. Working with some of the top editorial and strip cartoonists in the country, Sen. David A. Roberti, coordinator of the Cartoonists' Homeless Project, has helped persuade more than 100 artists to devote their panels to the subject on Tuesday. "Our goal is to tug at America's heartstrings through their funny bones," Roberti said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011
A roundup of entertainment headlines for Thursday: Taylor Swift is named the entertainer of the year at the Country Music Awards. Other honorees include newcomers Jason Aldean and the Band Perry. ( Los Angeles Times ) Calle 13 is up for a record 10 Latin Grammys at tonight's awards show. ( Los Angeles Times ) Brian Grazer has been tapped to produce the Oscars following Brett Ratner's resignation after he made an anti-gay slur. ( Los Angeles Times ) Eddie Murphy stepped down as Oscars host.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | GERALDINE BAUM
After 36 years with the same frumpy bob, Mommy finally has a new 'do. Today, comics readers get their first look at the make-over of the character in the popular comic strip "Family Circus." The author of the strip, Bil Keane of Paradise Valley, Ariz., apparently decided to update her hair after a reader complained that the pointy chin-length cut Mommy has had since the feature's debut in 1960 was old-fashioned.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
The first cartoon appeared in 19 newspapers on Feb. 29, 1960. It was a drawing of a census taker filling out a form and asking the woman of the house: "Any children?" The woman looks puzzled. Two dirty handprints of a child ring the doorknob. Assorted toys, a tricycle, volleyball, baseball and bat litter the floor and sofa. Three decades later, cartoonist Bil Keane, 67, continues to chronicle the lighter moments of American family life. But today, many more families share those moments.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his brief introduction to Kevin Fagan's fourth collection of "Drabble" cartoons, veteran cartoonist Bil Keane says, " 'Drabble' makes me laugh out loud more often any other comic strip. "Maybe it's because everyone in my 'Family Circus' is so normal that Norman and his dad seem uproariously funny. "Maybe it's the way it's drawn. "Maybe it's the quiet Laurel and Hardy zaniness of the gags." Or, he says, "maybe I just like stupidity. . . ."
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | PATRICK MOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How many people were at the head table at Saddleback College's "Top Cartoonists Forum"? Who could tell? Sure, there were Brant Parker and Mell Lazarus and Sergio Aragones and Kevin Fagan and Bil Keane and eight of their pals from the Southern California chapter of the National Cartoonists Society. All were giving The Word Saturday evening to a science lecture hall full of aspiring cartoonists, animators and funnies fans.
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