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Bilingual Classes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1998
Allan J. Favish (Commentary, Jan. 9) would deny an education and an opportunity to learn English to children who come with their parents in their desperate effort to feed them. Must we deny nourishment of their minds? What sort of society would deny innocent children the chance to become productive members of our increasingly complex world? GLORIA LASH Los Angeles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2012 | By Matt Stevens and Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
On the first day of the semester, Sylmar High math teacher Cesar Fuentes wasted no time: " Ven, tomen una computadora ," he said. "Go grab a laptop. " In minutes, the students flipped open the Apple computers, the lights went down and, like a digital textbook, the geometry curriculum popped onto the white board — every word written in Spanish. At Sylmar and three other high schools in Southern California, instructors are running some of the state's only rigorous bilingual math and science classes using online curriculum from Mexico.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2012 | By Matt Stevens and Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
On the first day of the semester, Sylmar High math teacher Cesar Fuentes wasted no time: " Ven, tomen una computadora ," he said. "Go grab a laptop. " In minutes, the students flipped open the Apple computers, the lights went down and, like a digital textbook, the geometry curriculum popped onto the white board — every word written in Spanish. At Sylmar and three other high schools in Southern California, instructors are running some of the state's only rigorous bilingual math and science classes using online curriculum from Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2005 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
Eliseo Quintero, guitar in hand, greets his pint-size students in bilingual song, chanting to the tune of "Freres Jacques": "Buenas tardes. Buenas tardes. ¿Como estas? How are you?" He wants the 3- and 4-year-olds to sing along, but because they've had little exposure to English or group singing, they hesitate. They are children of immigrants living in Santa Ana who have little tradition of preschool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
In response to a highly critical report by the Orange County Grand Jury, Santa Ana Unified School District officials on Monday defended their bilingual education classes as legal and helpful to students. The April report, which came after years of controversy over how the district teaches its Spanish-speaking students, battered officials for overemphasizing bilingual classes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2004 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
The way Denis O'Leary saw it, California's Reading First program was leaving too many children behind -- mostly poor and immigrant students, those who would benefit most from the federally funded literacy campaign. So the Oxnard-area teacher and school board trustee lent his name last year to a lawsuit that has helped reshape the reading program, ensuring that children in some of the state's poorest districts have access to millions of dollars once largely cut off from bilingual classrooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2000 | By ANNA GORMAN,
As I stepped into the second-grade classroom at Ventura's Juanamaria School with a picture book in hand, a feeling of nostalgia gripped me. I was back where I started. Before I became an education reporter, I spent two years as a third-grade teacher. It was a bilingual class and the children were from low-income families in East Oakland. Like many teachers, I adopted the students as my own. I called them "my kids." And I bragged about them daily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1999
Re Stephen Krashen's Dec. 21 letter on bilingual programs: We had almost 30 years of bilingual programs. The Chacon-Moscone bilingual bill was meant to help Latino children learn English, but it evolved into Spanish-only instruction for the first three or four years, and then the first six years, on the theory that if they learned to read, write and compute in Spanish they could transfer all these skills into English. But when did they get a chance to learn how to read, write and compute in English?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1999
What Roger Rasmussen has said in his article ("Begin by Teaching Kids English in Preschool," Commentary, Aug. 30) is probably the most important thing that's been said about education in years. Without knowing how to speak, read and write English, children haven't much chance to achieve anything in this society. I applaud Rasmussen's courage in saying it, in view of the Latino insistence on bilingual classes. Unfortunately, non-English-speaking children in this city are used as pawns in a political struggle for power; so the chances of getting that year of pre-kindergarten English instruction--the time and space required--are practically nil. If the politics could be removed from the issue we might accomplish something positive for children and for our society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1999
Your editorial "Bilingual Teachers Needed" (June 6) shows a misunderstanding of the intent and impact of Proposition 227. Proclaiming that 227's "sponge methodology" is working as predicted, The Times says that Santa Paula and Fillmore have eliminated bilingual education while Ventura, Port Hueneme and Oxnard have reinstated bilingual classes. Santa Paula and Fillmore do have programs, but only after denying most parents the decision to place their children into bilingual education classes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN and MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In what police called a hate crime, a Panorama City principal was beaten unconscious by two men who told him they didn't want him on campus because he is white, authorities said Tuesday. The attack at Burton Street Elementary School, which is predominantly Latino, may have been related to growing discontent by Latino parents over efforts to scale back bilingual education, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1998 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maribel Hernandez, a local artist with a special interest in teaching children the traditional arts and crafts of Mexico, will show how to decorate calaveras, or skulls, at a workshop Saturday. This is a traditional craft--generally employed for the autumn celebration of Dia de los Muertes (Day of the Dead)--where sugar is sculpted and decorated into images of skulls.
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