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Bill Damaschke

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
DreamWorks Animation is turning to the Australian outback for inspiration for its first full-on animated musical. The Glendale-based studio said it had tapped award-winning composer, actor and writer Tim Minchin to help create a musical project called "Larrikins," which is Australian slang for mischievous youth. The all-animal comedy, based on an original idea written by Harry Cripps ("Supernova") and produced by Christina Steinberg ("Rise of the Guardians," "National Treasure")
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
DreamWorks Animation is turning to the Australian outback for inspiration for its first full-on animated musical. The Glendale-based studio said it had tapped award-winning composer, actor and writer Tim Minchin to help create a musical project called "Larrikins," which is Australian slang for mischievous youth. The all-animal comedy, based on an original idea written by Harry Cripps ("Supernova") and produced by Christina Steinberg ("Rise of the Guardians," "National Treasure")
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
When Gore Verbinski was directing his upcoming movie, "Rango," a spaghetti western-like tale set in a desert town overrun by bandits, he did what he typically does: have his principal actors, led by Johnny Depp and fellow cast members that include Harry Dean Stanton, Abigail Breslin and Ray Winstone, act out key scenes. The actors wore western costumes ? Depp sported a giant cowboy hat and bandana and Winstone packed a sidearm. They had the usual array of props, including whiskey glasses and sawhorses, on a stage at Universal that also featured a saloon with a 40-foot-long wooden bar and the requisite swinging doors and even a chuckwagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Nearly 18 feet high and weighing about 1,200 pounds, this was one big dragon. The scaly pink puppet was meant to be a super-sized crowd-pleaser, says Jason Moore, director of the Broadway production of "Shrek The Musical," the stage version of DreamWorks Animation's hit movie . However it proved to be a super-sized distraction. "She was supposed to be endearing but ended up being kind of scary and off-putting. " Which is why the metallic behemoth, set on a rolling platform, was replaced by a large but nimbler, more engaging creature for the first national tour of "Shrek," which arrives at the Pantages Theatre on Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Nearly 18 feet high and weighing about 1,200 pounds, this was one big dragon. The scaly pink puppet was meant to be a super-sized crowd-pleaser, says Jason Moore, director of the Broadway production of "Shrek The Musical," the stage version of DreamWorks Animation's hit movie . However it proved to be a super-sized distraction. "She was supposed to be endearing but ended up being kind of scary and off-putting. " Which is why the metallic behemoth, set on a rolling platform, was replaced by a large but nimbler, more engaging creature for the first national tour of "Shrek," which arrives at the Pantages Theatre on Tuesday.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
DreamWorks Animation SKG, the creator of the Shrek films, promoted Bill Damaschke to be head of creative production and development and hired Kristine Belson as head of development. Damaschke, who has been at DreamWorks Animation for 10 years, will report to Chief Executive Jeffrey Katzenberg and Chief Operating Officer Ann Daly, Glendale-based DreamWorks Animation said. Belson will report to Damaschke.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
Bill Damaschke, a senior executive with DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc., has been named its president of live theatrical, a newly created position. Damaschke will oversee the company's live theatrical productions, beginning with "Shrek the Musical," projected to open on Broadway in 2008. Damaschke and colleague John Batter have also been made co-presidents of production for feature animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before slipping out early to watch the All-Star game. The Skinny: I'm now two episodes behind on CBS' "Under the Dome. " We know what that means. I either catch up this week or I'm throwing in the towel. I welcome all thoughts. Tuesday's roundup includes a preview of the Emmy nominations and a profile of DreamWorks Animation CEO Bill Damaschke. Daily Dose: Besides all the car and beer ads that will be in tonight's All-Star game on Fox, look for lots of promos for Fox Sports 1, the new cable network that launches next month.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Rancho Mirage estate of the late President Gerald Ford and Betty Ford has sold for $1.675 million. The buyers are entertainment business manager John McIlwee and Dreamworks Animation executive Bill Damaschke, who announced their intentions to preserve the 6,316-square-foot midcentury home. They purchased the furniture, including sofas and desks, and some of the artwork separately. The Fords built the Welton Becket-designed home in 1979. The gated compound encompasses 1.37 acres.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Considered deeply uncool at one point, music from animated movies is back - and singing along is now not only OK for kids, it's something adults record themselves doing on their phones and share on YouTube. The boom in popular songs from animated movies comes after a long fallow period when the form yielded few hits in the music world, despite box-office juggernauts like the "Toy Story," "Shrek" and "Ice Age" franchises. Though all incorporated music in their films, it was rarely the kind that had come to define the genre at Disney Animation in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when it was making music-driven hits like "The Lion King," "Beauty and the Beast" and "The Little Mermaid.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
When Gore Verbinski was directing his upcoming movie, "Rango," a spaghetti western-like tale set in a desert town overrun by bandits, he did what he typically does: have his principal actors, led by Johnny Depp and fellow cast members that include Harry Dean Stanton, Abigail Breslin and Ray Winstone, act out key scenes. The actors wore western costumes ? Depp sported a giant cowboy hat and bandana and Winstone packed a sidearm. They had the usual array of props, including whiskey glasses and sawhorses, on a stage at Universal that also featured a saloon with a 40-foot-long wooden bar and the requisite swinging doors and even a chuckwagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1993
Jeffrey A. Sumner, on the other hand, has plenty of words. Plus which, he can wear a wig with the best of 'em. He switches from frumpy housewife to Greek immigrant substitute teacher to ailing drag queen without missing a beat in the course of his multi-character monologue "The Eccentric Buffet" at Theatre/Theater. But the payoff comes in those moments when Sumner makes you go beyond the padded bra or the fake mustache and hear the anomie behind the chitchat. L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Product placement in the theater? There's a definite element of commercial hucksterism in Jeffrey Sumner's one-man show "My Life in Plastic" at Theatre/Theater. Thankfully, the corporate toadyism is largely offset by the sheer camp of the piece. Not so long ago, Sumner was a starving artist on the verge of bankruptcy.
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