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Bill Gardner

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NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
New Hampshire's secretary of state says that it is "up to Nevada" whether his state is forced to move its presidential primary into December, with that vote possibly coming in just less than eight weeks. Bill Gardner, who by state law has sole authority to set the date of New Hampshire's contest, also says in a memo released Wednesday that his state will not surrender its traditional first-in-the-nation position. "Several aspiring Americans likely would not have become president if they weren't first able to make their case door-to-door, face-to-face, eye-to-eye with New Hampshire voters," Gardner writes.
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NATIONAL
October 27, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
On Bill Gardner's desk one day last week rested a column from a Las Vegas newspaper lamenting the imminent "surrender" of Nevada Republicans in their effort to move the state closer to the front of the presidential nominating calendar. They had surrendered to the man behind the desk, the 63-year-old New Hampshire secretary of state, who had stared down Nevada to the surprise of no one who has watched him wield tremendous clout in the process of choosing a president. Written on top of the page, and circled for emphasis, was another term in the column: "King Bill.
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NATIONAL
March 2, 2007 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
BILL Gardner was at it again, mucking up Democrats' timetable for picking their presidential nominee by insisting on the date he wanted for New Hampshire's vote. So one day, frustrated party leaders sent an emissary to the state Capitol to deal with the balky secretary of state. Gardner, however, would not bend. He was adamant about preserving New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary by pushing the contest forward a week, rather than have it share its election day with Vermont.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
New Hampshire's secretary of state says that it is "up to Nevada" whether his state is forced to move its presidential primary into December, with that vote possibly coming in just less than eight weeks. Bill Gardner, who by state law has sole authority to set the date of New Hampshire's contest, also says in a memo released Wednesday that his state will not surrender its traditional first-in-the-nation position. "Several aspiring Americans likely would not have become president if they weren't first able to make their case door-to-door, face-to-face, eye-to-eye with New Hampshire voters," Gardner writes.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
On Bill Gardner's desk one day last week rested a column from a Las Vegas newspaper lamenting the imminent "surrender" of Nevada Republicans in their effort to move the state closer to the front of the presidential nominating calendar. They had surrendered to the man behind the desk, the 63-year-old New Hampshire secretary of state, who had stared down Nevada to the surprise of no one who has watched him wield tremendous clout in the process of choosing a president. Written on top of the page, and circled for emphasis, was another term in the column: "King Bill.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2000
In his April 10 Counterpunch article ("KPCC's New Management Doesn't Get L.A."), Robert Adels wrote that "KPCC gave the boot to its only minority broadcaster, Daniel A. Castro," host of "The Sancho Show." Not so. KPCC also booted Bill Gardner, longtime host of Friday night's "R&B Time Capsule" and "Rhapsody in Black." Bill Gardner is not only black. He grew up in South-Central Los Angeles in the '40s and '50s and was able to bring a unique perspective on this city's black music to a broader Los Angeles market.
SPORTS
May 21, 1988
Jim Perley of Coronado defeated Jim Nelson of Newport Beach, 6-1, 6-2, in a quarterfinal match of the Men's 45s National Hardcourt championships Friday at the Lindborg Racquet Club in Huntington Beach. Perley, a two-time finalist, is the tournament's top-seeded player.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Nevada Republicans on Saturday voted to move the date of their nominating caucuses to February, a decision that likely ends uncertainty over the 2012 election calendar and avoids having the first votes for president cast this year. The state party's executive committee shifted the GOP caucuses to Feb. 4, after New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner said he was prepared to call the  first-in-the-nation primary in December if Nevada's caucuses remained on Jan. 14. "We think that it's time somebody acted like an adult," former Nevada Gov. Bob List, a member of the state executive committee, said in an interview before the meeting.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A state appeals court on Friday dealt a blow to Michigan political leaders' hopes of holding a presidential primary Jan. 15. In a 2-1 ruling, Judges Patrick Meter and Donald Owens objected that a law recently passed by the Legislature setting up the primary would let the state political parties keep track of voters' names and whether they took Democratic or GOP primary ballots but give no public access to that information.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2000
Once again, another radio station has been bought, and the new owners can't wait to change the format with little regard for their listeners ("KPCC Clears Out Music Shows for News-Talk Format," by Judith Michaelson, March 4). As an avid radio listener, I find this format changing very disheartening and frustrating. Each time this happens, a little piece of me feels ripped apart, and the healing process is slow. I had found KPCC's format to be quite unique, and I for one will miss two of their music shows--"Rhapsody in Black With Bill Gardner" and "Ann the Raven"--tremendously.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2007 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
BILL Gardner was at it again, mucking up Democrats' timetable for picking their presidential nominee by insisting on the date he wanted for New Hampshire's vote. So one day, frustrated party leaders sent an emissary to the state Capitol to deal with the balky secretary of state. Gardner, however, would not bend. He was adamant about preserving New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary by pushing the contest forward a week, rather than have it share its election day with Vermont.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner announced Wednesday that his state's first-in-the-nation primary will be held on Jan. 10, finalizing the schedule of the first nominating contests in the 2012 presidential election. New Hampshire's primary will follow one week after the leadoff Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3. South Carolina Republicans will vote 11 days after New Hampshire on Jan. 21, followed by the Florida primary on Jan. 31. It was Florida's decision to leapfrog the traditional early states and hold its primary in January that started a chain reaction that nearly forced voting into December.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Republicans in five states will push ahead with early nominating contests, undeterred by party leaders' decision Thursday to punish them by excluding half their convention delegates. Seeking to restore order to a chaotic primary calendar, Republican National Committee Chairman Mike Duncan said New Hampshire, Florida, South Carolina, Michigan and Wyoming would lose delegates to next summer's national convention for violating party rules against holding nominating contests before Feb. 5.
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