Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsBill Neal
IN THE NEWS

Bill Neal

NEWS
November 3, 1991 | PAUL HOUSTON and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an apparent violation of a longstanding House rule, former California congressman John H. Rousselot has spent much of last week on the House floor lobbying lawmakers on two controversial issues under active consideration on Capitol Hill. Rousselot, a lobbyist for the Bank of America, acknowledged in an interview that he has discussed a comprehensive banking measure with key members of the House Banking Committee, on which he formerly served.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 29, 1985 | STEVE HENSON, Times Staff Writer
On one particular play Saturday at Mountclef Stadium, Cal Lutheran College football players hit viciously, gave plenty of second effort and helped teammates off the ground. It wasn't a pass or a run, however, and no points were scored, unless a boxing judge happened to be among the crowd of 3,720. The Kingsmen got the best of a bench-clearing brawl in the fourth quarter but, when the hitting counted, were soundly beaten, 37-15, by Cal State Hayward.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Movies about movie making often plunge into one of two traps: they're smugly celebratory or murderously iconoclastic. "Hearts of Darkness" (at the Hillcrest Cinemas) is neither. Taking as its subject the hellishly troubled shooting of Francis Coppola's 1979 "Apocalypse Now," it's about an endeavor so vast and chastening, you can't describe it as either triumph or fiasco.
NEWS
February 25, 1996 | BRYAN MINGLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"NewsRadio" may not be the NBC sitcom most of America is talking about this season, but it's getting honorable mentions as the funniest series set in a newsroom since "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." Following in the ensemble workplace tradition of "Taxi," "WKRP in Cincinnati" and "MTM" isn't a bad thing, and it only seems to help that "NewsRadio" is the mid-'90s dysfunctional hybrid of them all and that actual work is rarely if ever shown.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1996 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here is a chance to camp under the oaks deep in Point Mugu State Park, miles from noisy traffic and glaring city lights. There is just one small catch: You have to be willing to get your hands dirty, and maybe a little blistered. It's Santa Monica Mountains Trail Days from April 26 to 28, part of a statewide effort to spruce up California's parkland. State park officials and a number of local groups are coordinating the two-day workout in Point Mugu State Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1997 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It may seem strange that a musician would tap into a vein of calm to bring power to his work. But it makes perfect sense to Bill Neal. He has to block out the ruckus of everyday life to capture the mood for playing his traditional Native American flutes. "We're becoming numb to all of the manufactured sounds that invade our space on a daily basis," said Neal, who counts Cherokees among his ancestors and performs under the name Elk Whistle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Susan King
Most everyone woke up to the sad news Sunday morning that “Glee” star Cory Monteith was found dead at the of age of 31. Monteith became an overnight sensation in 2009 on Fox's musical-comedy series as Finn Hudson, a high school football star who becomes an integral member of the school's glee club. Over the decades, other regulars on TV series have also died suddenly. Here is a look at a few: Larry Hagman The actor was in his second season reprising his signature role of the ruthless J.R. Ewing on TNT's reboot of “Dallas” when he died Nov. 23, 2012, of complications from cancer at the age of 81. The producers came up with a clever way for J.R.'s character to die in the series this past spring, which involved J.R. hatching a “beyond the grave” plan to implicate his nemesis Cliff Barnes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE GREG BRAXTON and T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former "Saturday Night Live" comic Phil Hartman was shot to death early Thursday, apparently by his wife, who killed herself as police were shepherding the couple's two children from the family's million-dollar Encino home. Officers responding to a call of shots fired at the home arrived to find the couple's 9-year-old, Sean, fleeing out the front door. They took the boy to safety, then returned to get his 6-year-old sister, Birgen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Thomas Babe, a playwright who was best known for plays that cast a critical eye on American history, died Dec. 6 in Stamford, Conn., from lung cancer. He was 59. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Babe was a resident playwright at the New York Shakespeare Festival, the innovative off-Broadway institution led by the powerful producer Joseph Papp.
FOOD
March 5, 1992 | CANDY SAGON, THE WASHINGTON POST
Most movies show food for only a few seconds. But in "Fried Green Tomatoes," the tale of women, friendship and Southern food set in the fictional town of Whistle Stop, food is paramount. "A 'Babette's Feast' of the South" is how director Jon Avnet described the film to food stylist Cynthia Hizer Jubera. Much of the action revolves around the Whistle Stop Cafe. What Avnet needed Jubera to do was recreate the food served during the 50 years the film spans, from the Depression to modern times.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|