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Bill Of Rights

OPINION
November 24, 1991
Dec. 15 is a remarkable date for the United States; it is 200 years since the Bill of Rights has gone into effect. On the eve of this date I decided to write to you. I am 34 and work as an electrical engineer, but much of my free time I spend studying English and the history of America. When I read the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States and the amendments to the Constitution, I was greatly impressed by the wisdom of these important historical documents and by how accurately they reflect my notion of democracy, liberty and human rights.
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OPINION
December 15, 2009 | By Jonathan Estrin and Marshall Croddy
Watching the often vitriolic debates in Congress these days can be disturbing. But disagreement and debate are part of our national DNA. Consider the Bill of Rights, which was as controversial when it was first debated as parts of it still are today. FOR THE RECORD: Rights: An Op-Ed article Monday on the Bill of Rights said it was ratified 118 years ago. It was ratified 218 years ago. — The founders of our country, united in the revolution, were divided over the issue of including a bill of rights in the Constitution of 1787.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1990
Ekard forgot to mention that the electronic media will not be able to use television, or that the press can't use printing presses because TV and electricity weren't invented when the Bill of Rights was written. P.S. Also let's not forget religion as some of the new denominations were not around back then. STUART A. PONZIO Downey
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1991
I congratulate The Times for its recent coverage on our most important document, the Bill of Rights. While we as a society can disagree about the specific meaning and the scope of the doctrines contained in the Bill of Rights, it is crucial that all in our community understand their own rights, respect the rights of others and be prepared to debate them in a meaningful way. The Constitutional Rights Foundation is proud of its role in sponsoring the...
OPINION
June 9, 2007 | Kal Raustiala, KAL RAUSTIALA is director of the Ronald W. Burkle Center for International Relations and a professor of law and global studies at UCLA.
IN 1953, in Upper Heyford, England, an American named Clarice Covert killed her husband with an ax as he lay sleeping, then climbed into bed with his bloody corpse. The next day she confessed her terrible deed to a psychiatrist at the air base where her husband was stationed. She was quickly convicted of murder, not by a jury trial but by a U.S. court-martial. Her crime might have been long forgotten.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1987 | MICHAEL J. BOSKIN, Michael J. Boskin is the Wohlford Professor of Economics at Stanford.
President Reagan has proposed an initiative he calls an "economic bill of rights" to protect the individual citizen/taxpayer from the excesses of government budget policy. The initiative contains several proposals, some new, others recycled. The centerpiece is a constitutional amendment requiring a balanced federal budget every year.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2009 | Hugo Martin
The travails of passengers on a flight stranded overnight on an airport tarmac in Rochester, N.Y., and new data on airline delays are giving fresh ammunition to supporters of an airline passenger bill of rights. Two major business travel groups, frustrated by ongoing airline delay problems, have joined the call for federal legislation to address snafus like the nightmare that took place in Rochester last month. The Aug. 8 flight from Houston to Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., was diverted to Rochester because of severe weather.
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