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Bill T Jones

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April 12, 2000 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A week before his engagement at UCLA's Royce Hall, Bill T. Jones is anxious to talk about new work and pointedly not interested in revisiting his high-profile decision to abide by the NAACP boycott of South Carolina while the Confederate flag flies over the State House there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
Nestled away in Western Massachusetts' bucolic Berkshire Mountains sits Jacob's Pillow, founded in the 1930s by visionary dance pioneer Ted Shawn and now home to the U.S.'s premiere dance festival and teaching center. The Pillow's unique history and striking performance credentials receive a warmly reverent close-up in Ron Honsa's documentary "Never Stand Still. " A virtual Who's Who of modern and classical dance masters have taught, choreographed or performed at the Pillow, known the world over for its annual summer celebration of the art form.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Sid Smith
On a dreary, gray day in March 2008, choreographer Bill T. Jones spoke to a small group of well-wishers in the home of businesswoman Desiree Rogers on Chicago's Near North Side. Tinkling ice, urbane chitchat and cognoscenti goodwill defined the party up to that point, Rogers' smart modern art collection the backdrop. Then Jones took the floor to discuss his assignment to create a full-length dance-theater piece about Abraham Lincoln for the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park, Ill. "I want to feel Lincoln in this very room," he said, looming in the hush that followed as a momentary conjurer or even seance medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2012 | By Jean Lenihan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Thirty-plus years after founding La La La Human Steps, Montreal-based choreographer-director Édouard Lock has become a sort of philosopher-king for the fierce and intelligent abstract dance made popular in the 1980s. While other members of that chic choreographic wave (Bill T. Jones, Karole Armitage) have since ventured into explorations of history, narrative and world cultures, Lock, 59, is still ruthlessly focused on the manipulation of human gesture that arose from a revelation he had in his 20s. "You kind of figure out at some point that movement is about 90% aesthetic and 10% functional," Lock explained by telephone from Vancouver, Canada, on a North American tour that brings his company to the Irvine Barclay Theatre this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Two years ago, just before the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company played UCLA, the city of Bologna, Italy, offered Jones a commission to create a work about Mediterranean culture in the New World. Titled "You Walk?," that work arrived Friday in Royce Hall looking very much in its best sections like outtakes from "We Set Out Early . . . Visibility Was Poor," the meditative, masterly full-evening abstraction that the Jones/Zane company was touring when the Italians made their offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2007 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
BY almost every measure, 2007 has been a good, if hectic, year for postmodern choreographer Bill T. Jones, who will bring his topical evening-length meditation on patriotism, "Blind Date," to UCLA's Royce Hall next weekend. Apart from touring almost nonstop with the Bill T. Jones / Arnie Zane Dance Company, Jones, 55, was inducted in June into the Hall of Fame at the National Museum of Dance in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.
OPINION
October 20, 1996 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is project director at the Hajjar & Partners New Media Lab. He interviewed Bill T. Jones in Irvine, where the choreographer was staging his dance work, "Still/Here."
It's no wonder choreographer Bill T. Jones has latched onto German artist Kurt Schwitters as the inspiration for one of his latest dance works. Schwitters survived the collapse of Germany after World War I, and created his art from discards retrieved from street gutters and trash bins. "I value sense and nonsense alike," Schwitters wrote in 1928. "I favor nonsense, but that is a personal matter." Putting sense aside is a welcome change for Bill T. Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2009 | Lewis Segal
Our new president's interest in the lore and legacy of Abraham Lincoln is not exactly a state secret. So when the most prominent and perennially controversial black choreographer on the planet makes a full-evening work about Honest Abe and the link between the dangerous turbulence of his time and ours, head for the storm cellar. Commissioned by the Ravinia Festival as part of its Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration, Bill T. Jones' "Fondly Do We Hope . . . Fervently Do We Pray" arrived at the Granada Theatre on Tuesday as part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures season.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1991 | R. M. CAMPBELL, R. M. Campbell is the music and dance critic for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. and
Choreographers have rarely spent their creative energies exploring the open-ended question of religious faith. The subject, it seems, has never been particularly in vogue. Yet, Bill T. Jones, in his newest work, "The Last Supper at Uncle Tom's Cabin/The Promised Land," does exactly that. The three-hour, post-modern spectacle also looks at other big subjects such as freedom and racial anger. Jones has reason to ponder the old question.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nigel Redden, general director of the Spoleto Festival USA, understands the dilemma faced by artists scheduled to perform at his event in May and June. The famed Charleston, S.C., music, dance and theater gathering is a natural target in the state's Confederate flag controversy, he concedes. Which is why he wasn't surprised when choreographer-dancer Bill T.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bill T. Jones won his second Tony Award for choreographing "Fela!," a musical about the late Nigerian Afrobeat singer, composer and political activist Fela Anikulapo Kuti. Jones, 59, also cowrote the book and directed the high-energy show about the government's crackdown on his commune. "Fela!" comes to the Ahmanson Theatre on Tuesday and runs through Jan. 22, 2012. Were you familiar with Fela's music before this project? Yes, I was. Fela was very important to a lot of us in the '70s, maybe not as important as Bob Marley.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2011 | By Debra Levine, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"It's about the loss of the voice of the people. It's about my father's memory, and my relationship with him. And listening to WAMO [a black radio station in Pittsburgh] growing up. " Contemporary choreographer Kyle Abraham is articulating the highly personal content he's woven into his award-winning, full-evening work, "The Radio Show. " His troupe of silken urban movers, Abraham.In.Motion, will perform the work at REDCAT this weekend in his California debut. The hip-hop love child of Martha Graham (he's part of a generation that has rediscovered floor work in choreography)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2011 | By Susan Josephs, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bonnie Lewkowicz has been a professional dancer for more than 20 years. She has worked with Bill T. Jones, Stephen Petronio, Joe Goode and other prominent modern dance choreographers. She's also paralyzed from the chest down. Needless to say, when she tells people what she does for a living, "it's still a conversation stopper. " "People will say, 'Oh, so you don't need to use your wheelchair all the time?' When someone with a disability says they dance, a pretty narrow image tends to come into people's heads," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2010 | Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
Who is the most influential world leader alive today? Chris Rock thinks he knows. On Sunday night, before a massive crowd at the Kennedy Center in Washington, the comedian gazed up into the balcony where the president sat with some very special guests. "It's amazing to look up and see the most powerful person in the world," said Rock, who was all dressed up in his black-tie best. "And she's sitting next to Barack Obama. " Up in the presidential box, Oprah Winfrey gazed down upon her fans, those loyal buyers of Oprah books and heeders of good bra advice, who paid as much as $5,000 per ticket to see her feted at the 33rd annual Kennedy Center Honors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Paul McCartney may be in the running for his own parking space in the White House lot: He's being honored yet again in the nation's capital, along with TV host Oprah Winfrey, country music stalwart Merle Haggard, choreographer Bill T. Jones and veteran Broadway composer and lyricist Jerry Herman , as a recipient of this year's Kennedy Center Honors. In June, McCartney performed for President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama when he received the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2009 | Lewis Segal
Our new president's interest in the lore and legacy of Abraham Lincoln is not exactly a state secret. So when the most prominent and perennially controversial black choreographer on the planet makes a full-evening work about Honest Abe and the link between the dangerous turbulence of his time and ours, head for the storm cellar. Commissioned by the Ravinia Festival as part of its Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration, Bill T. Jones' "Fondly Do We Hope . . . Fervently Do We Pray" arrived at the Granada Theatre on Tuesday as part of the UCSB Arts and Lectures season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Combining his genius for dreamlike, stream-of-consciousness contemporary dancing with a career-long commitment to social issues, Bill T. Jones' "Another Evening: I Bow Down" is an abstract full-evening dance-drama about living through turbulent times and letting catastrophe inspire positive action. On the stage of USC's Bovard Auditorium on Thursday, Jones and nine members of the Bill T.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2010 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Paul McCartney may be in the running for his own parking space in the White House lot: He's being honored yet again in the nation's capital, along with TV host Oprah Winfrey, country music stalwart Merle Haggard, choreographer Bill T. Jones and veteran Broadway composer and lyricist Jerry Herman , as a recipient of this year's Kennedy Center Honors. In June, McCartney performed for President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama when he received the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Sid Smith
On a dreary, gray day in March 2008, choreographer Bill T. Jones spoke to a small group of well-wishers in the home of businesswoman Desiree Rogers on Chicago's Near North Side. Tinkling ice, urbane chitchat and cognoscenti goodwill defined the party up to that point, Rogers' smart modern art collection the backdrop. Then Jones took the floor to discuss his assignment to create a full-length dance-theater piece about Abraham Lincoln for the Ravinia Festival in Highland Park, Ill. "I want to feel Lincoln in this very room," he said, looming in the hush that followed as a momentary conjurer or even seance medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | Chris Pasles
Choreographer Bill T. Jones, whose postmodern takes on social issues often spark controversy, has been commissioned by the Ravinia Festival outside Chicago to create a work on the life of Abraham Lincoln. The piece, tentatively titled "A Good Man," is scheduled to be premiered by the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in September 2009 as the centerpiece of the music festival's "Mystic Chords of Memory" commemoration of the 16th president's bicentennial.
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