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Bill Viola

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November 17, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
When video artist Bill Viola was an art student, he was obliged to take a traditional class in life drawing. But his passion was electronic media; he had no patience for drawing. So he made a videotape of the model and traced her contours on the monitor. "It didn't go over very well," the amiable, bearded artist admitted in an informal lecture Tuesday night at Newport Harbor Art Museum, which owns and is exhibiting his "Theater of Memory" installation piece.
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April 12, 2009
Some glimpses of the conductor from his friends and colleagues who were asked to share a key memory. The reminiscences were mostly written, at the invitation of The Times. Several were shared in interviews with music critic Mark Swed and staff writer Mike Boehm. MARK KASHPER Philharmonic violinist One of Esa-Pekka's favorite Finnish jokes goes like this: Q. What's the difference between Finnish introvert and extrovert? A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video art has its loopy pranksters, its didactic ranters, its slice-of-life chroniclers and its academics. But none of its practitioners are as consistently revelatory as the poets . By poets , I mean those artists who use imagery and sound--as well as the intimacy of the TV format--in allusive ways that allow each viewer to come to a private understanding of what is seen and heard.
MAGAZINE
February 25, 2007
I have been profoundly moved by Bill Viola's work for many years ("Doubt, Dry Spells and Days in the Desert," by Alan Rifkin, The Art Issue, Jan. 28). However, I have rarely been able to express exactly what it was about his work that touched me so deeply. Rifkin's article put into words the roots of my fascination. It is a challenge to write about art. Moving art is even more difficult. Mary Casey Finan La Mirada
MAGAZINE
January 28, 2007 | Alan Rifkin, Alan Rifkin is the author of "Signal Hill: Stories" and is completing a novel in the MFA creative writing program at Cal State Long Beach.
One saturday at his Signal Hill studio, where it's so quiet you can hear the oil derricks churn 200 yards away, Bill Viola is speaking to 20 undergraduates from Art Center. The weather outside is soft and smoggy, and the light is druggy-tropical--a good day for some students in Converse sneakers to plop down on pause before their real careers begin.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer.
"It's sort of a cross between making a movie and a sculpture," Bill Viola said of his innovative video work that fills entire galleries with sound and light. Combining the static forms of video hardware with fleeting images that he captures on tape, he is known for a body of work that evokes spiritual and emotional realms of experience. Birth, death and states of awareness are among the subjects that intrigue him.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1997 | Hunter Drohojowska Philp, Hunter Drohojowska Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A pioneer of video art, Bill Viola, 46, found his way to the medium by playing in a rock band in the late 1960s. Although he was proficient in painting and drawing, his search for an alternative art form led him to courses in electronic music and video at Syracuse University. And the rest is history. Viola, a 15-year resident of Long Beach, was awarded a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant in 1989, and in 1995 he became the first video artist to represent the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1997 | Christopher Knight, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
There was a time, just a generation or so ago, when photography and video were creative mediums that existed in a kind of parallel artistic universe. Over here was real art, code name for painting and sculpture, which is where the cultural action could be found, and over there were photography and video, subsets of art that were very nice and all but that occupied separate, smaller, more particularized niches. Specialty acts, if you will.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video art has its loopy pranksters, its didactic ranters, its slice-of-life chroniclers and its academics. But none of its practitioners are as consistently revelatory as the poets . By poets , I mean those artists who use imagery and sound--as well as the intimacy of the TV format--in allusive ways that allow each viewer to come to a private understanding of what is seen and heard. In "New California Video 1994-95," a group show at the Long Beach Museum of Art through Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Something very strange is going on in Bill Viola's new video, "Emergence." It isn't just that the 6 1/2-foot-square, rear-projection piece -- which went on view this weekend in "Bill Viola: The Passions" at the J. Paul Getty Museum -- resembles a luminous Old Master painting. Viola has been poking around in art history for several years.
MAGAZINE
January 28, 2007 | Alan Rifkin, Alan Rifkin is the author of "Signal Hill: Stories" and is completing a novel in the MFA creative writing program at Cal State Long Beach.
One saturday at his Signal Hill studio, where it's so quiet you can hear the oil derricks churn 200 yards away, Bill Viola is speaking to 20 undergraduates from Art Center. The weather outside is soft and smoggy, and the light is druggy-tropical--a good day for some students in Converse sneakers to plop down on pause before their real careers begin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2004 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
In a darkened editing bay at a Hollywood postproduction studio a couple of weeks ago, video artist Bill Viola was playing with fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2003 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
When the new Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels opened in September with its pallid array of commissioned art, I couldn't help wondering how different it might have been had Bill Viola been invited to contribute a work. Viola's art is determinedly secular, not religious, but an absence of doctrinal divinity does not equate with a lack of spiritual power.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Something very strange is going on in Bill Viola's new video, "Emergence." It isn't just that the 6 1/2-foot-square, rear-projection piece -- which went on view this weekend in "Bill Viola: The Passions" at the J. Paul Getty Museum -- resembles a luminous Old Master painting. Viola has been poking around in art history for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2002 | Christopher Knight
Bill Viola Video artist The mystery of human consciousness has been at the center of Viola's art for 30 years. Thirteen video works, all new since the L.A. artist's terrific midcareer survey at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1997, make up the international touring show "Bill Viola: The Passions," organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum (Jan. 24-Apr. 27).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2001
Sept. 11 wasn't the only event to shape the arts and entertainment world in 2001. But it had far-reaching reverberations, beyond delayed season premieres, dark stages, thwarted logistics and fluctuating movie schedules. For many, it provided a test of will: the will to create, the will to perform, the will to interpret, the will to keep on.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1999 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
As a student at Syracuse University in the early '70s, artist Bill Viola pursued two passions: music and video. He studied with avant-garde pianist and composer David Tudor, even playing in some of Tudor's electronic music concerts, and he encountered pioneers in the genre like composer Edgard Varese. Simultaneously, he immersed himself in the emerging field of video art, ultimately becoming one of its premier practitioners. But he refused to bring the two art forms together.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Bill Viola has been making unusually compelling video art for 25 years. To get an idea of what he's up to in his work, consider this: The magnificent retrospective exhibition of his career that opened Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art features 15 different installations, but no identifying labels are anywhere in sight. None. No wall texts offer commentary, context or explanation. No timelines record recent social history.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1999 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
As a student at Syracuse University in the early '70s, artist Bill Viola pursued two passions: music and video. He studied with avant-garde pianist and composer David Tudor, even playing in some of Tudor's electronic music concerts, and he encountered pioneers in the genre like composer Edgard Varese. Simultaneously, he immersed himself in the emerging field of video art, ultimately becoming one of its premier practitioners. But he refused to bring the two art forms together.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Bill Viola has been making unusually compelling video art for 25 years. To get an idea of what he's up to in his work, consider this: The magnificent retrospective exhibition of his career that opened Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art features 15 different installations, but no identifying labels are anywhere in sight. None. No wall texts offer commentary, context or explanation. No timelines record recent social history.
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