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Bill Watterson

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April 8, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The latest collection of "Calvin and Hobbes" proves that Bill Watterson is, simply, the best comic-strip artist working in America today. Eight-year-old Calvin's imaginary adventures--including a visit to Mars, a series of in-flight maneuvers when he's carried away by a balloon and the excavation of a dinosaur skeleton (which turns out to be an assemblage of old litter)--showcase the artist's extraordinary ability to re-create a child's perception of the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Steven-Charles Jaffe's first-rate documentary "Gahan Wilson: Born Dead, Still Weird" appears right on the heels of "Dear Mr. Watterson," another enjoyable cinematic profile of a famed cartoonist ("Calvin and Hobbes'" Bill Watterson). But Jaffe's film has a distinct advantage: Wilson, unlike the reclusive Watterson, happily and thoroughly participates in this highly dimensional recap of his life and career, to compelling effect. The jaunty, eccentric Wilson, 83, has been generating his unique brand of humorously macabre cartoons for more than 50 years.
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BOOKS
April 5, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The latest anthology of "Calvin and Hobbes" demonstrates how a comic strip evolves. Since Watterson began drawing the strip in 1987, the rambunctious Calvin and his intrepid tiger-companion Hobbes have grown less angular and more appealingly rounded. The changes in their appearance are due in part to the process psychologists call shaping: When an artist continually redraws a figure, his wrist tends to move in a circular pattern. As Watterson has polished the graphic appearance of his characters, he's also deepened his explorations of their psychology.
BOOKS
October 9, 2005 | Charles Solomon, Charles Solomon is the author of many books, including "Enchanted Drawings: The History of Animation," and is a frequent contributor to The Times and National Public Radio's program "Day to Day."
DURING the all-too-brief time it ran -- from Nov. 18, 1985, to Dec. 31, 1995 -- "Calvin and Hobbes" was simultaneously the most old-fashioned and the most innovative comic strip in newspapers. Its creator, Bill Watterson, returned to the principles of polished draftsmanship, visual imagination and character-driven humor that have been the source of comic strips' popularity since their inception in the 1890s.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Calvin, the rambunctious, 6-year-old star of "Calvin and Hobbes," is going away--but not as Spaceman Spiff, private-eye Tracer Bullet or any of his other imaginary guises. Beginning today, cartoonist Bill Watterson is taking a nine-month leave of absence from his popular comic strip. Until Watterson returns with new material on Feb. 1, 1992, the Universal Press Syndicate will distribute reruns from the first 14 months of "Calvin and Hobbes" to newspapers, including The Times.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the old days, successful comic-strip artists drew till they dropped dead--and sometimes longer, if their strips were bequeathed to others. Then, in 1983, "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau rattled the industry by taking a 20-month sabbatical. "That sabbatical inspired other sabbaticals, and those sabbaticals led to retirements," says Steve Moore, whose "In the Bleachers" panel appears in about 200 papers, including The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1987 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Scientists at the American Rocket Company (AMROC) in Silicon Valley are currently testing a pair of prototype commercial rocket engines that they've christened, Calvin and Hobbes, after the mischievous little boy and stuffed tiger in Bill Watterson's syndicated comic strip. (Two earlier engines were named Elwood and Jake, after the Blues Brothers.
NEWS
April 1, 1994
"Calvin and Hobbes" cartoonist Bill Watterson will be on sabbatical beginning Sunday and continuing through Dec. 31. During that period, The Times will rerun selected "Calvin and Hobbes" cartoons from 1989 and 1990. Universal Press Syndicate, which distributes the strip to about 2,300 newspapers, said Watterson is taking a break from "the manic pace" of drawing the cartoon seven times a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987 | Charles Solomon
"Calvin and Hobbes," Bill Watterson's ultra-popular newspaper comic strip about a difficult little boy and the toy tiger who serves as his imaginary companion, is getting some rare tributes lately--homages from other cartoonists. Teddy Monclava, the problem child in "Mary Worth," has been wearing a T-shirt with a picture of Hobbes, the tiger. And in "Bloom County," cartoonist Berke Breathed pictured character Michael Binkley in a T-shirt that read "Calvin and Hobbes Rule."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1990
"How come we play war and not peace?" --Hobbes Bill Watterson, the comic-strip artist behind Calvin and Hobbes, has made a good point. We have wars because that is the environment we have grown up in. It is the first way we learn to solve problems. When we are kids, we play war; our heroes are GI Joe, Rambo and guns. How could anyone have grown up and not have had the idea of war stained deep into his or her brain? I can understand why kids play war but not why mature, wise, ignorant adults still play the same game.
NEWS
December 30, 1999
Bill Watterson's homage ("Drawn Into a Dark but Gentle World, Dec. 21) to Charles Schulz, "Peanuts" and the gang was very apt. Their departure will leave a hole in our lives. What could help fill that gap would be the return of Watterson's "Calvin and Hobbes." HARRY M. BAUER Sherman Oaks Via e-mail Editor's Note: Before Watterson decided to retire after 10 years, "Calvin and Hobbes" appeared in 2,500 newspapers. Mr. Watterson expressed everything I have felt after learning of Mr. Schulz's illness and retirement, and my admiration and appreciation for having them as long as we have, mirrors everything in the article.
NEWS
November 24, 1995
I am as dismayed as any "Calvin and Hobbes" fan to see my favorite comic strip end ("When Cartoonists Go Kapow!" Nov. 16). Bill Watterson's social commentary, combined with brilliant artwork reminiscent of the late great Winsor McKay's "Little Nemo," is an entertainingly accurate reflection of our times. I can understand Watterson's desire to pursue new interests. The cutbacks and downsizing of our current economic climate force many of us to compromise professional quality and integrity in pursuit of a paycheck.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the old days, successful comic-strip artists drew till they dropped dead--and sometimes longer, if their strips were bequeathed to others. Then, in 1983, "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau rattled the industry by taking a 20-month sabbatical. "That sabbatical inspired other sabbaticals, and those sabbaticals led to retirements," says Steve Moore, whose "In the Bleachers" panel appears in about 200 papers, including The Times.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
Calvin and Hobbes, the terrible tyke and his sidekick tiger, will be retired from the funny pages on Dec. 31. In a letter to newspaper editors Thursday, cartoonist Bill Watterson said the decision to end the strip was not a recent or easy one. "I believe I've done what I can do within the constraints of daily deadlines and small panels," Watterson, 38, said in the letter. "I am eager to work at a more thoughtful pace, with fewer artistic compromises."
NEWS
April 1, 1994
"Calvin and Hobbes" cartoonist Bill Watterson will be on sabbatical beginning Sunday and continuing through Dec. 31. During that period, The Times will rerun selected "Calvin and Hobbes" cartoons from 1989 and 1990. Universal Press Syndicate, which distributes the strip to about 2,300 newspapers, said Watterson is taking a break from "the manic pace" of drawing the cartoon seven times a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
As a kid who grew up back East in a high-minded household that believed in one God and one newspaper--the New York Times--I never had a chance to read the funnies. (Eventoday, the good, gray NYT doesn't print a single comic strip.) Oh, I'd thumb furtively through comic books at stationery shops, but that wasn't nearly the same as spending entire Sunday mornings belly-flopped on a swath of wall-to-wall carpet, in thrall to the never-ending adventures of old friends.
NEWS
November 24, 1995
I am as dismayed as any "Calvin and Hobbes" fan to see my favorite comic strip end ("When Cartoonists Go Kapow!" Nov. 16). Bill Watterson's social commentary, combined with brilliant artwork reminiscent of the late great Winsor McKay's "Little Nemo," is an entertainingly accurate reflection of our times. I can understand Watterson's desire to pursue new interests. The cutbacks and downsizing of our current economic climate force many of us to compromise professional quality and integrity in pursuit of a paycheck.
NEWS
December 27, 1999
I enjoyed reading the article (Dec. 21) by Bill Watterson about Charles M. Schulz and "Peanuts" ("Drawn Into a Dark but Gentle World"). When I reached the last paragraph, my thoughts came back to Bill Watterson because he had written: "Schulz has given all his readers a great gift, and my gratitude for that tempers my disappointment at the strip's cessation." I am in my mid-60s and I have enjoyed reading the comics pages of the L.A. Times for most of my life. "Calvin and Hobbes" was my all-time favorite strip, hands down, no contest, no others need apply!
BOOKS
April 5, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The latest anthology of "Calvin and Hobbes" demonstrates how a comic strip evolves. Since Watterson began drawing the strip in 1987, the rambunctious Calvin and his intrepid tiger-companion Hobbes have grown less angular and more appealingly rounded. The changes in their appearance are due in part to the process psychologists call shaping: When an artist continually redraws a figure, his wrist tends to move in a circular pattern. As Watterson has polished the graphic appearance of his characters, he's also deepened his explorations of their psychology.
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