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BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
The average American would have to fork over an extra $1,259 in state and federal income taxes this year to make up for the revenue lost because of offshore tax havens used by corporations and wealthy individuals, according to a new report. U.S. companies will use offshore tax havens to avoid paying an estimated $110 billion in taxes this year, according to the analysis by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. Wealthy people will circumvent about $74 billion in taxes. The report underscores the controversial issue of major companies using elaborate maneuvers to sidestep taxes, often by stowing income in overseas subsidiaries set up primarily for tax purposes.
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SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
When Donald Trump announced a couple of weeks ago he wanted to buy the Buffalo Bills, many dismissed it as a typical publicity ploy by The Donald. Not true, he says. "I'm going to give it a heavy shot," Trump told the Buffalo News on Monday. "I would love to do it, and if I can do it, I'm keeping it in Buffalo. I live in New York, and it's easier for me to go to Buffalo than any other place. " Trump says the only thing that could get in his way is for someone to come in with an overpriced bid. "I have a track record that's pretty much unparalleled," Trump said, "but that doesn't mean that I pay stupid prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Papa Bear is angry that his acolyte is leaving, it seems.  On Monday night's edition of "The O'Reilly Factor," a reader wrote in to host Bill O'Reilly commenting on CBS' choice of Stephen Colbert to take over late night from the retiring David Letterman. While Colbert's Comedy Central show, "The Colbert Report," is a deliberate parody of "The O'Reilly Factor" and Colbert refers to O'Reilly as Papa Bear on the air, the Fox News host seemed less than positive about Colbert's prospects in his new role.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Andrew Khouri
Most Californians can't afford their rent. The state's affordability crisis has worsened since the recession, as soaring home prices and rents outpace job and income growth. Meanwhile, government funds to combat the problem have evaporated. Local redevelopment agencies once generated roughly $1 billion annually for below-market housing across California, but the roughly 400 agencies closed in 2012 to ease a state budget crisis. In addition, almost $5 billion from state below-market housing bonds, approved by voters last decade, is nearly gone.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - It's the season at the California Capitol for flowering dogwoods, blooming azaleas and the state Chamber of Commerce's annual "job killer" list. Never short of targets, the 13,000-member chamber this year is eyeing 26 bills that it contends would harm the job-creation climate and the ongoing economic recovery if passed by the Legislature and signed into law by the governor. Most of the proposals deal with the workplace, including minimum wage hikes and paid sick days; taxes and legal and regulatory matters.
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein and Dan Wiederer
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Bill Haas is playing his fifth Masters, but he knows Augusta National almost as well as most members. Great-uncle Bob Goalby won the 1968 Masters and often tells Bill: “You're a better player than the scores you shoot.” Bill first played the course in high school. And he often accompanied his father, Jay Haas, who played in 22 Masters. “I wasn't interested in the Masters,” Bill said. “I was interested in my dad's score at the Masters, if that makes sense.” Bill's first-round score garnered plenty of interest, given that he was the clubhouse leader after firing a 4-under 68. Defending champion Adam Scott was one back, as were Louis Oosthuizen and Bubba Watson, and several players were at 2-under.
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Dan Wiederer
AUGUSTA, Ga. - By the time Bubba Watson tapped in for a textbook par on the final hole of his opening round at the Masters, he had that familiar feeling. Watson felt both a surge of energy and a sense of ease at Augusta National, a satisfaction in the patience and precision that paved his way to a three-under-par 69 Thursday. A solid day's work. Three-way tie for second place. One shot off the lead set by Bill Haas. Two years ago, Watson left these grounds with a green jacket, triumphing in a playoff over Louis Oosthuizen with a swashbuckling, crowd-pleasing approach.
SPORTS
April 10, 2014 | By Teddy Greenstein and Dan Wiederer
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Craig and Kevin Stadler ("Walrus" and "Smallrus") became the first father-son combo to play in the same Masters, but perhaps they're not the first family of this week's festivities. Check out the Haas household. Bill Haas overcome a first-hole bogey Thursday to shoot a four-under-par 68, good for the first-round lead. Father Jay Haas played in 22 Masters, making 19 cuts. Uncle Jerry Haas participated in 1985. An uncle from his mother's side, Dillard Pruitt, teed it up here in 1992 and '93. Oh, and great-uncle Bob Goalby won the 1968 event, avoiding a playoff after Argentina's Roberto De Vicenzo signed for the wrong Sunday score.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | Tony Perry
Putting the brakes on a controversial bill to ban killer whale shows at SeaWorld San Diego, an Assembly committee Tuesday called for additional study that could take at least 18 months. Naomi Rose, a marine mammal scientist at the Animal Welfare Institute, one of the bill's sponsors, said she was disappointed by the move but pleased at the idea of more study -- although it remained unclear how the study would be conducted. John Reilly, president of SeaWorld San Diego, said he doubted a compromise is possible with people backing the bill.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - With sought-after women voters at stake, Senate Republicans blocked election-year legislation Wednesday aimed at ensuring that female workers receive equal pay for doing the same work as men. A high-profile campaign for the Paycheck Fairness Act, orchestrated by the Democratic-controlled Senate and the White House, did little to motivate Republicans in a mid-term election year when both parties are seeking women voters. Republican senators blocked the bill on a party-line filibuster, 53-44, with many waging a protest vote over party leaders' refusal to allow amendments.
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