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Billy Barty

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billy Barty, the diminutive entertainer who turned the ability to spin on his head into a seven-decade show business career, died Saturday at Glendale Memorial Hospital. He was 76. The cause of death was heart failure, said his publicist, Bill York. Barty had been hospitalized for heart problems and a lung infection, York said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Television Critic
William Stulla, a man I only ever knew as "Engineer Bill," died Tuesday at the estimable age of 97. Some of my first memories of television, which is to say, some of my first memories of life, are of his show, which KHJ (now KCAL) ran weeknights at dinner time from 1954 to 1966. Perhaps because of his age, which was relatively advanced even then, or perhaps just because of his horn-rimmed glasses, he seemed the most eminent of the local kids-show hosts, the boss in my mind of a complement that also included Chucko the Birthday Clown (Charles M. Runyon)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Billy Barty, the 3-foot-9-inch actor whose career has spanned seven decades, was released from a hospital Saturday after treatment for injuries he received while driving a scooter at the Garden Grove Strawberry Festival, officials said. Barty, 74, was riding on an outdoor stage about 9:15 p.m. Friday night after a performance when his scooter toppled over and dropped him headfirst onto a concrete set of stairs, festival director Ken Slimmer said. The actor fractured his eye socket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2001
I would like to add my testimonial to the fact that Billy Barty (Obituaries, Dec. 24, and Letters to the Editor, Dec. 29) did indeed play college football--and not on just a pickup team, but on the college's regular varsity team, winning him a letterman's sweater, which he wore proudly on campus. I attended Los Angeles City College after World War II, from 1947 to 1950. I was features editor of the college newspaper, The Collegian, right after Billy had been advertising manager, and I eventually became Associated Students vice president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's a 3-foot-9 sensation every time he steps onto the red-carpeted Astrodome floor at the Republican National Convention here this week--posing for pictures, shaking hands, doing interviews. Billy Barty, who has appeared in more than 200 movies since his 1927 debut at the age of 3, is a gung-ho Republican and a convention guest. The North Hollywood resident says he's representing "the little people," or fellow dwarfs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Billy Barty, dean of the screen's little people, is perfect casting in the title role of "Rumpelstiltskin" (citywide), the first in a projected series of feature-length musical fairy tales from Cannon Films. He's the most mischievous magical elf of them all, willing to spin straw into gold so that Katie (Amy Irving), the beautiful but humble miller's daughter, may win the hand of a handsome prince (John Moulder Brown, stuck with a wimpy mustache) and live happily ever after.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Billy Barty--at 3 feet 9 inches, one of the nation's best-known little people--believes that TV's small screen can be a great equalizer. Come Saturday night, when his comedy-variety series "Short Ribbs" debuts on Orange County's KDOC-TV Channel 56, Barty, 65, hopes the half-hour show will enable other little people "to act like regular people."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Actor Billy Barty claimed a victory even though a county Small Claims Court judge ordered him to pay one of his former writers $1,328. Barty said he considered Monday's decision a win because he didn't have to award 10% of future syndication profits for his show, "Short Ribbs," to writer-producer Bill Winckler. "It went fine, it went very good, I was very pleased at the judge's decision," Barty said by phone after he was ordered to pay Winckler $1,300 in disputed salary and $28 in court costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Actor Billy Barty was ordered to pay $428 to a television show writer who claimed that he wasn't paid for creating several comedy sketches. Burbank Municipal Court Commissioner Dennis H. Shanklin on Monday granted the award to Warren Taylor for sketches he wrote for "Short Ribbs," which aired last year on KDOC-TV in Anaheim and is no longer in production. Taylor had already been paid $800 for his work on the show, including a satirical skit that featured Barty as a crooked judge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2000
I was saddened to read about the death of Billy Barty (Dec. 24). In June of 1943 I graduated from high school and immediately joined the Navy. There was a waiting period of about five months before I was to report to boot camp, so I enrolled at L.A. City College to take a few courses. It was there that I met Billy. There was no organized football because of wartime restrictions, so a group of us formed our own teams and Billy was on mine. During one of our games I sustained a severe knee injury and Billy carried me off the field unassisted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billy Barty, the diminutive entertainer who turned the ability to spin on his head into a seven-decade show business career, died Saturday at Glendale Memorial Hospital. He was 76. The cause of death was heart failure, said his publicist, Bill York. Barty had been hospitalized for heart problems and a lung infection, York said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Billy Barty, the 3-foot-9-inch actor whose career has spanned seven decades, was released from a hospital Saturday after treatment for injuries he received while driving a scooter at the Garden Grove Strawberry Festival, officials said. Barty, 74, was riding on an outdoor stage about 9:15 p.m. Friday night after a performance when his scooter toppled over and dropped him headfirst onto a concrete set of stairs, festival director Ken Slimmer said. The actor fractured his eye socket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1996 | Jerry Hicks
Billy Barty is a fine actor, adept at both comedy and drama. But nobody offers Barty roles in Shakespeare or Academy Award-type movies. These days, Barty doesn't get offered much at all. "A couple of years ago, it really started to dry up," Barty says. "My name came up for one part, and I'm told the casting director said, 'Who is Billy Barty?'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1992 | WILLSON CUMMER
Billy Barty, a 3-foot-9-inch dwarf actor, knows how to make people around him feel comfortable with his size. Barty sauntered up to a stage at the Fullerton Public Library on Friday, walked behind the podium and disappeared. People seated in the front row shifted nervously. No one had remembered to bring a stool for Barty. "As I look out over this lovely audience . . . " Barty began, hidden from view. Laughter erupted from the audience of schoolchildren and senior citizens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's a 3-foot-9 sensation every time he steps onto the red-carpeted Astrodome floor at the Republican National Convention here this week--posing for pictures, shaking hands, doing interviews. Billy Barty, who has appeared in more than 200 movies since his 1927 debut at the age of 3, is a gung-ho Republican and a convention guest. The North Hollywood resident says he's representing "the little people," or fellow dwarfs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1996 | Jerry Hicks
Billy Barty is a fine actor, adept at both comedy and drama. But nobody offers Barty roles in Shakespeare or Academy Award-type movies. These days, Barty doesn't get offered much at all. "A couple of years ago, it really started to dry up," Barty says. "My name came up for one part, and I'm told the casting director said, 'Who is Billy Barty?'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1992 | WILLSON CUMMER
Billy Barty, a 3-foot-9-inch dwarf actor, knows how to make people around him feel comfortable with his size. Barty sauntered up to a stage at the Fullerton Public Library on Friday, walked behind the podium and disappeared. People seated in the front row shifted nervously. No one had remembered to bring a stool for Barty. "As I look out over this lovely audience . . . " Barty began, hidden from view. Laughter erupted from the audience of schoolchildren and senior citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Actor Billy Barty was ordered to pay $428 to a television show writer who claimed that he wasn't paid for creating several comedy sketches. Burbank Municipal Court Commissioner Dennis H. Shanklin on Monday granted the award to Warren Taylor for sketches he wrote for "Short Ribbs," which aired last year on KDOC-TV in Anaheim and is no longer in production. Taylor had already been paid $800 for his work on the show, including a satirical skit that featured Barty as a crooked judge.
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