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Billy Beane

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September 21, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
As the calendar turned to September, with the Oakland Athletics in the heat of a pennant race, their general manager was half a world away. Billy Beane was in Prague, and not on a scouting trip. Baseball's most unconventional operation has done it again. The A's will be crowned champions of the American League West for the second consecutive year, perhaps Sunday. Beane has run the A's for 16 years. Oakland is about to win the AL West for the sixth time in his tenure. The Angels have won five times in that span, the Texas Rangers four times, the Seattle Mariners once.
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SPORTS
September 21, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
As the calendar turned to September, with the Oakland Athletics in the heat of a pennant race, their general manager was half a world away. Billy Beane was in Prague, and not on a scouting trip. Baseball's most unconventional operation has done it again. The A's will be crowned champions of the American League West for the second consecutive year, perhaps Sunday. Beane has run the A's for 16 years. Oakland is about to win the AL West for the sixth time in his tenure. The Angels have won five times in that span, the Texas Rangers four times, the Seattle Mariners once.
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SPORTS
August 13, 1988 | SCOTT MILLER
It's more than two hours before game time late in the afternoon, and a steady rain is falling at the Lucas County Recreation Center, home of the Toledo Mud Hens, triple-A affiliate of the Detroit Tigers. Inside a cramped, steamy clubhouse, Billy Beane and Billy Bean wait to see if that night's game against the Rochester Red Wings will be played. William Lamar Beane III, 26, is a right-handed outfielder from San Diego.
SPORTS
January 13, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
In the front offices of major league clubs, the statistics-vs.-scouts debate ended long ago. No club today could imagine winning without tapping the resources of the increasingly sophisticated statistical tools available as well as the experience of scouts trained to look at a kid today and project his tomorrows. Yet that debate was very much alive in 2003, sparked by the book "Moneyball," and by author Michael Lewis' portrayal of how Oakland Athletics General Manager Billy Beane and assistant Paul DePodesta challenged the hegemony of the scouting community.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Winning isn't everything, voracious Vince Lombardi used to say, it's the only thing. But what if Lombardi was wrong? What if other things mean more, last longer, have more significance than victories, not only in life but also in the particular lives of the people who play the games? This is the heretical premise of the thoughtful and entertaining "Moneyball," based on the equally iconoclastic bestseller by Michael Lewis. Starring Brad Pitt in top movie star form, it's a film that's impressive and surprising.
SPORTS
September 20, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
He first appears in the movie as he first appeared with the Dodgers, a wallflower pulled reluctantly into the spotlight, a nerd suddenly tapped on the shoulder by the cool kids. The character that is supposed to be Paul DePodesta is a rumpled and bespectacled figure leaning against a wall whispering trade vetoes to a Cleveland Indians colleague. The character that is supposed to be Billy Beane openly wonders who he is, and why everyone thinks he's so smart, and so begins a journey that Dodgers fans will instantly and painfully recognize.
SPORTS
September 11, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
The champagne flowed easily, and so did the toasts. The San Francisco Giants had just won the World Series, and the shouts came from all corners of the clubhouse. To Willie Mays! To Tim Lincecum! To Aubrey Huff's rally thong! And this, from around a corner, from Giants executive Tony Siegle: "So much for 'Moneyball.' " The book that polarized an industry hits the big screen next week, with Brad Pitt starring as Billy Beane, the maverick general manager of the Oakland Athletics.
SPORTS
July 7, 2003 | Larry Stewart
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. What: "Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game" Author: Michael Lewis Publisher: W.W. Norton Price: $24.95 Michael Lewis is a respected financial writer who usually focuses on what takes place on Wall Street rather than what takes place in the sports world.
SPORTS
July 22, 2007 | Bill Shaikin
You might have heard of this David Beckham fellow by now. His face is all over this newspaper, and everywhere else in town. His corporate sponsors, the ones that have rewarded him with riches beyond belief, hope and pray that he compels you to think about soccer. Billy Beane could change the way you think about soccer. Yes, that Billy Beane. It's getting old, this business of running a contender at half the price.
SPORTS
November 13, 2003 | Ross Newhan and Jason Reid, Times Staff Writers
Apparently fed up over speculation that Billy Beane has been campaigning for his job, Dodger General Manager Dan Evans confronted his Oakland A's counterpart during a phone call last week, a baseball official said Wednesday. Asked about the call, Beane aimed a pointed response in Evans' direction after initially saying he wasn't sure if it was appropriate to comment on a private call. "Unfortunately," he said, "rumor and speculation have a tendency to create insecurities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Winning isn't everything, voracious Vince Lombardi used to say, it's the only thing. But what if Lombardi was wrong? What if other things mean more, last longer, have more significance than victories, not only in life but also in the particular lives of the people who play the games? This is the heretical premise of the thoughtful and entertaining "Moneyball," based on the equally iconoclastic bestseller by Michael Lewis. Starring Brad Pitt in top movie star form, it's a film that's impressive and surprising.
SPORTS
September 20, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
He first appears in the movie as he first appeared with the Dodgers, a wallflower pulled reluctantly into the spotlight, a nerd suddenly tapped on the shoulder by the cool kids. The character that is supposed to be Paul DePodesta is a rumpled and bespectacled figure leaning against a wall whispering trade vetoes to a Cleveland Indians colleague. The character that is supposed to be Billy Beane openly wonders who he is, and why everyone thinks he's so smart, and so begins a journey that Dodgers fans will instantly and painfully recognize.
SPORTS
September 11, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
The champagne flowed easily, and so did the toasts. The San Francisco Giants had just won the World Series, and the shouts came from all corners of the clubhouse. To Willie Mays! To Tim Lincecum! To Aubrey Huff's rally thong! And this, from around a corner, from Giants executive Tony Siegle: "So much for 'Moneyball.' " The book that polarized an industry hits the big screen next week, with Brad Pitt starring as Billy Beane, the maverick general manager of the Oakland Athletics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Toronto — In June 2009, just a few days before Brad Pitt, director Steven Soderbergh and others were set to board a plane for Phoenix to begin shooting the film version of Michael Lewis' baseball bestseller "Moneyball," the unthinkable happened. Despite the months spent preparing the shoot and the star wattage involved, Sony Pictures Co-Chairman Amy Pascal pulled the plug on the movie. Soderbergh was leaving the project, the studio announced, and the film's future was in serious doubt.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
I have to admit that when Michael DeLuca called me earlier this year, saying he was finally going to get "Moneyball" made into a movie, I figured he must've been smoking the proverbial Hollywood crack pipe. Anyone who loves baseball has read Michael Lewis' bestseller about how Oakland A's General Manager Billy Beane almost single-handedly upended the traditional way baseball evaluates athletic talent.
SPORTS
March 25, 2008 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
This wasn't about the money. You hear someone in sports say those words, and skepticism is the natural reaction. But Billy Beane zigs when baseball zags, with enough success to suppress the skepticism. Eric Chavez is the survivor within the Oakland Athletics' clubhouse. He watched Jason Giambi go, and Miguel Tejada, and Tim Hudson and Mark Mulder and Barry Zito. "It always seems like we're reinventing ourselves yearly in Oakland," Chavez said. "This is obviously to the extreme."
SPORTS
October 11, 2003 | Ross Newhan
Although there is no reason to think it is already in the works or about to happen, it can be classified as obvious, inevitable and legitimate speculation. More than ever, the planets seem aligned in such a way as to suggest that what could be a cosmic turnover in front-office personnel under a new Dodger owner might include the arrival of Billy Beane as general manager, or even president-general manager.
SPORTS
July 22, 2007 | Bill Shaikin
You might have heard of this David Beckham fellow by now. His face is all over this newspaper, and everywhere else in town. His corporate sponsors, the ones that have rewarded him with riches beyond belief, hope and pray that he compels you to think about soccer. Billy Beane could change the way you think about soccer. Yes, that Billy Beane. It's getting old, this business of running a contender at half the price.
SPORTS
April 25, 2004 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The Dodgers hired Billy Beane's bright young assistant as their general manager two months ago, prompting some to wonder why the Dodgers hadn't hired Beane himself. Beane, the widely acclaimed general manager of the Oakland Athletics, once had wanted the Dodger job, an acknowledgment he makes publicly for the first time, even as he suggests his time in Oakland might be running out.
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