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Billy Bob Thornton

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012
MOVIES The actor Billy Bob Thornton has led one of cinema's more colorful recent careers (when Angelina Jolie wears a vial of your blood, you're doing something right), and he tells all in his new book "The Billy Bob Tapes: A Cave Full of Ghosts. " The signing accompanies screenings of two of his landmark movies: his Coen brothers collab "The Man Who Wasn't There" and "A Simple Plan. " Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., L.A. 6:15 p.m. Fri. americancinematheque.org.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The Coen brothers' 1996 comedy-noir masterpiece "Fargo" wasn't so much a movie as it was a cultural event - you remember where you were when you first saw it. That endless yet claustrophobic snow scape, the anxious narcissism of William H. Macy's scheming car salesman, the glory of Frances McDormand's pregnant police chief Marge. It blew out the wall between hilarity and horror to prove that both dwell in the same landscape. It showed that senseless violence was simply one more item on the spectrum of human behavior, alongside love and honor and courage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Since his star-making turn nearly two decades ago as the mentally challenged Karl Childers in "Sling Blade," Billy Bob Thornton has been known for what may best be described as playing expressive eccentrics. There was a bad Santa, an astronaut farmer and a taciturn barber so lacking in human connection that the movie about him was titled "The Man Who Wasn't There. " In FX's highly touted new series "Fargo," Thornton adds to that oddball gallery when he plays a drifter named Lorne Malvo.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Greg Braxton
Since his star-making turn nearly two decades ago as the mentally challenged Karl Childers in "Sling Blade," Billy Bob Thornton has been known for what may best be described as playing expressive eccentrics. There was a bad Santa, an astronaut farmer and a taciturn barber so lacking in human connection that the movie about him was titled "The Man Who Wasn't There. " In FX's highly touted new series "Fargo," Thornton adds to that oddball gallery when he plays a drifter named Lorne Malvo.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | Reuters
The wife of Academy Award winner Billy Bob Thornton filed for divorce Friday, citing irreconcilable differences. According to the lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, Pietra Dawn Thornton is seeking custody of the couple's two children--William, 3, and Harry James, 2--and wants spousal support and attorney's fees to be paid by her husband. The couple was married Feb. 18, 1993, and separated Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A war of the posters is going on in a certain acting family. They're battling on the streets and walls of this film festival town. The husband is losing, badly, but he's enchanted and, frankly, bemused. "My wife's here, big as hell," says Billy Bob Thornton, pointing over his shoulder at the huge blowups of Angelina Jolie as "Lara Croft, Tomb Raider" that dwarf the entrance to the Carlton Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1997 | SCOTT COLLINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billy Bob Thornton, who this week won an Oscar for his "Sling Blade" script, has seemingly revealed every last detail about his life and the story behind the movie, including his past heart problems, failed marriages and battles with studio executives. But there's still more to tell, as video customers may have already learned. Thornton has seldom talked about a 29-minute black-and-white short he wrote and starred in nearly four years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The Coen brothers' 1996 comedy-noir masterpiece "Fargo" wasn't so much a movie as it was a cultural event - you remember where you were when you first saw it. That endless yet claustrophobic snow scape, the anxious narcissism of William H. Macy's scheming car salesman, the glory of Frances McDormand's pregnant police chief Marge. It blew out the wall between hilarity and horror to prove that both dwell in the same landscape. It showed that senseless violence was simply one more item on the spectrum of human behavior, alongside love and honor and courage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Parkland" hangs on a split second on Nov. 22, 1963, when a president was shot, a country was wounded and a city was brought to its knees. This unsettling film zeros in on the initial impact - just four days - for those closest to the president, for the many ordinary people of Dallas who became involved, and for a city that would begin to wear the assassination of John F. Kennedy like a shroud. It is the way in which ordinary acts began to define an extraordinary moment in history, and the residue of regret that would stay with the city, that Peter Landesman's new film seeks to mine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2007 | John Anderson, Special to Newsday
That Americans worship their children only makes Billy Bob Thornton more deliciously, subversively funny as a tormenter of the young. He made them suffer in "The Bad News Bears," abused them in "Bad Santa" and is back in business as the nightmarish gym teacher of "Mr. Woodcock," a movie that commits sins of excess, except regarding Thornton. There's not nearly enough of him.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Mary McNamara
“Fargo”: For those who remember that miracle of watching the Coen brothers' deeply dark and hilarious 1996 masterpiece unfurl across the big screen, FX's bold, brave experiment in cinematic crossover takes some getting used to, but it's well worth the effort.   Written by Noah Hawley (with the Coens' blessing), this “Fargo” is at once eerily similar and completely different than the film that inspired it. Yes, we are once again traveling down a narrow strip of highway that bifurcates the snowy plains of Minnesota into a tiny town where the local accent is a running joke and the introduction of violence is about to turn everything inside out. As in the film, there is a hit man, played with dark brilliance by Billy Bob Thornton, a whining milquetoast (Martin Freeman)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Fans of the Coen brothers' Oscar-winning crime dramedy "Fargo" can finally get their first peek at what the new TV series will look like with the first full-length trailer, released Tuesday. There's a lot that looks familiar here: frozen vistas, unfortunate mustaches, dark crime and that ever-present upbeat "oooo yaaaa" exaggerated Minnesota accent. But there's a lot that's different. The series, which stars Billy Bob Thornton, Martin Freeman, Kate Walsh, Colin Hanks, Adam Goldberg, Bob Odenkirk, Jordan Peele and Keegan-Michael Key, among others, isn't just an extended retelling of the Coens' film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
FX's upcoming "Fargo" limited series is rounding out its cast, and has added some notable names, including "Breaking Bad's" Bob Odenkirk and Kate Walsh of "Private Practice. " In case you've been crossing your fingers that AMC's "Breaking Bad" follow-up, "Better Call Saul," gets the go-ahead, don't worry about Odenkirk's appearance on "Fargo. " The key words are "limited series. " The 10-episode adaptation of Joel and Ethan Coen's film crime classic shares the motion picture's Minnesota setting and title, but that's about it. Producers promise that this "Fargo" will tell a completely new story, but retain the film's "true story" conceit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Parkland" hangs on a split second on Nov. 22, 1963, when a president was shot, a country was wounded and a city was brought to its knees. This unsettling film zeros in on the initial impact - just four days - for those closest to the president, for the many ordinary people of Dallas who became involved, and for a city that would begin to wear the assassination of John F. Kennedy like a shroud. It is the way in which ordinary acts began to define an extraordinary moment in history, and the residue of regret that would stay with the city, that Peter Landesman's new film seeks to mine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Abele
  The Vietnam-era Southern family saga "Jayne Mansfield's Car," Billy Bob Thornton's first directorial outing in more than a decade, is old-fashioned big-cast melodrama, treated by its director as if it were a nostalgic heirloom. Written with Thornton's "One False Move" co-writer Tom Epperson, the movie even gets away with its classicist vibe for a good while too. Robert Duvall plays an small-town Alabama patriarch with three middle-aged sons (zoned-out loner Thornton, hard-headed Robert Patrick, anti-war hippie Kevin Bacon)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
FX is bringing back "Fargo. " Not the movie, but a new miniseries. A revamped version of the Coen Brothers' 1996 black comedy starring Oscar winner Frances McDormand as a pregnant police chief investigating a murder case will premiere in spring on the cable network which will star another Oscar winner, Billy Bob Thornton. John Landgraf, chief executive officer of FX Networks, announced the project as a highlight of the network's upcoming slate, which will include a ramping up of original scripted comedies that will air on FX and its satellite networks, FXX and FXM. VIDEO: Summer 2013 TV preview The new "Fargo" will be a 10-part miniseries.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Abele
  The Vietnam-era Southern family saga "Jayne Mansfield's Car," Billy Bob Thornton's first directorial outing in more than a decade, is old-fashioned big-cast melodrama, treated by its director as if it were a nostalgic heirloom. Written with Thornton's "One False Move" co-writer Tom Epperson, the movie even gets away with its classicist vibe for a good while too. Robert Duvall plays an small-town Alabama patriarch with three middle-aged sons (zoned-out loner Thornton, hard-headed Robert Patrick, anti-war hippie Kevin Bacon)
NEWS
August 16, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
Almost sent directly to TV, this bleakly amusing and truly moving film by director Carl Franklin proved to be the sleeper of 1992. Dramatic and suspenseful, it charts a collision course involving three losers on the run. They include Billy Bob Thornton, who also wrote the script with Bob Epperson, Cynda Williams (pictured) and Michael Beach. Jim Metzler and Earl Billings play two Los Angeles cops in pursuit and Bill Paxton portrays a naive Arkansas sheriff (Bravo early Tuesday at 1 a.m.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Actor-screenwriter Billy Bob Thornton has sold his estate in Beverly Hills for $8 million. Built in 1929, the 11,012-square-foot Spanish-style mansion retains its period details and features a two-story living room, a recording studio, a gym, a library, nine bedrooms and eight bathrooms. The walled and gated property of more than a half-acre includes a swimming pool, a spa, fountains and a paddle tennis court. Thornton, 57, directed, wrote and starred in the movie "Sling Blade" (1996)
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