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Billy Hunter

SPORTS
July 2, 2011 | Mark Heisler
Oh, no, am I here all alone? Actually, the world didn't end when the NBA locked its players out. The NBA didn't even end, even if it felt as if was about to as darkness moved across the land. I have nothing against doomsday scenarios ... but if that's all that's out there, something had better be coming to an end, or it's just the media chasing its tail again. With months of this idiocy left, let's see how close we can come to some actual perspective: Who's pushing this, owners or players?
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SPORTS
July 26, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
As the NFL wrapped up its lengthy off-season collective-bargaining battle, the NBA's lockout of its players continued Tuesday with no progress in sight. One major sports labor deal down, one to go. As the NFL wrapped up its lengthy off-season collective-bargaining battle, the NBA's lockout of its players continued Tuesday with no progress in sight. "If there's one thing us labor lawyers know -- and the public will see in this [NBA] case -- there's nothing like the prospect of deadlines, in this case, missing games, that forces action," said Seth Borden, a partner in employment and labor law for the Washington, D.C.-based firm McKenna Long and Aldridge.
SPORTS
July 29, 2011 | Wire reports
If NBA stars are serious about playing overseas, basketball's governing body says they will be welcomed. Just as long as they promise to leave once the lockout ends. FIBA announced Friday that it would clear NBA players under contract to play in its leagues during the work stoppage, provided the deals they sign come with opt-out clauses. In a ruling that paves the way for players to earn paychecks, FIBA agreed with NBA and players' association officials that players are free to sign anywhere but do so at their own risk of injury.
SPORTS
May 16, 2013 | Staff and Wire reports
Keegan Bradley had no thoughts about a course record, or the possibility of a 59, after consecutive bogeys in the middle of his opening round in the Byron Nelson Championship at Irving, Texas. Until his 136-yard wedge shot on his final hole Thursday. "It was going right at it. [A 59] crossed my mind for a second, and it would be unbelievable if I buried this," Bradley said. "But I had three feet to shoot 60. I was actually very nervous, uncomfortable over it and thank God I made it. " Bradley shot 10-under-par 60, completed by that short birdie at the 428-yard ninth hole, to break the TPC Four Seasons course record and match the best round ever at the Nelson.
SPORTS
November 10, 2011 | By Mike Bresnahan and Broderick Turner
It's getting redundant to write, but NBA labor negotiations stopped again without a new deal in place. The lockout lurched though its 134th day Thursday after an 11-hour bargaining session in New York failed to bear a new collective bargaining agreement between NBA owners and the players' union. Owners made a slightly revised offer, but union executives looked less than impressed. "It's not the greatest proposal in the world but I have an obligation to at least present it to our membership," union executive director Billy Hunter said while flanked by a handful of somber players.
SPORTS
November 26, 2011 | By Mike Bresnahan
It took 149 days and countless hours of hand-wringing, but the NBA lockout finally appears to be over. Representatives for owners and players pushed back from the negotiating table after agreeing on the framework of a deal early Saturday morning in New York, creating the foundation for a 66th NBA season. Prospects of an agreement were rocky as recently as last week when the players dissolved their union, but the 2011-12 season was scheduled to start Christmas Day, NBA Commissioner David Stern said.
SPORTS
October 7, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
The NBA players' association wanted a meeting and said the league would grant one — under one condition. Just agree first to a 50-50 split of revenues. Players already rejected that offer once. The league confirmed it wasn't moving beyond that number but wanted to meet about other issues, and it said the union wasn't interested. All that matters: An on-time start to the NBA season now seems even less likely. Commissioner David Stern has said the league will cancel the first two weeks of the regular season if the sides can't reach a labor agreement by Monday, and it now appears the sides won't even talk before then.
SPORTS
November 14, 2011 | By Mike Bresnahan and Broderick Turner
The prospects for a 2011-12 NBA season might have ended Monday. The 138th day of the NBA lockout failed to land a deal between players and owners, prompting Commissioner David Stern's ominous midday statement that the season was "now in jeopardy. " The players' union began the process of disbanding and filed a "disclaimer of interest" so it could soon deliver a more weighty document — an antitrust lawsuit against the NBA in which players could claim the league conspired to prevent them from marketing themselves and making a living.
SPORTS
October 21, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire, Mike Bresnahan and Broderick Turner
Thirty men, 30 opinions. The NBA owners presiding over the league's increasingly bitter lockout of players aren't united behind the idea that it's better to lose an entire season rather than accept a bad labor deal. For now, however, the hawks outnumber the more conciliatory owners, such as the Lakers' Jerry Buss, the New York Knicks' James Dolan, the Miami Heat's Micky Arison and the Dallas Mavericks' Mark Cuban. Billy Hunter, executive director of the players' union, said those four want to make a deal.
SPORTS
November 18, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
On the docket the antitrust case is known as Anthony v. NBA. But it might as well be called Kessler v. Stern. For a quarter-century NBA Commissioner David Stern has faced the same opponent at the negotiating table: players' attorney Jeffrey Kessler. Stern recently called Kessler "the single most divisive force in our negotiations. " Kessler, 57, made his reputation by handling complex antitrust and sports law cases and also teaches at Columbia Law School. He said the NBA labor dispute is easy to resolve.
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