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Binge Drinking

HEALTH
March 14, 2005 | From Reuters
College students drink more alcohol and are more likely to binge drink than young adults who are not in college, but the nonstudents are more likely to be dependent on alcohol, a new study has found. Other studies have found that students are more likely to take part in heavy or binge drinking than peers in the same age group who do not attend college.
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NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
An analysis of 31 studies on alcohol drinking patterns worldwide has found that people born in North America after World War II are more likely than other groups to engage in binge drinking and develop alcoholism. Younger groups consistently consume more alcohol than older generations.   Researchers, led by Katherine M. Keyes of Columbia University, evaluated data dating from 1948. She found that the United States differs from Western Europe and Australia because a larger number of Americans don't drink at all. But the number of nondrinkers in this country is declining.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As colleges focus increasingly on the problem of alcohol on campus, a new survey from the Harvard School of Public Health shows that more college students than ever are drinking with the sole purpose of getting drunk. Data released here last week from the school's 1997 College Alcohol Study also show that four of five fraternity and sorority members are binge drinkers.
HEALTH
May 8, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
IN recounting her battles with alcohol, author Koren Zailckas doesn't skimp on the details -- her first drink at 14, the years of blackouts and hangovers, waking up in a strange man's apartment and, finally, her embrace of sobriety at the ripe old age of 22. Her story is notable because she crafted it into a bestselling book, "Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood," not because it's rare.
OPINION
March 7, 1999 | DAVID SATCHER, David Satcher is surgeon general of the United States
Wine producers recently won permission to display new labels on their bottles that urge consumers to learn more about "the health effects of wine consumption." Realizing that some people may not have time to consult their doctors on this matter--and as a result they may draw an incorrect message from these labels--I would like to share a few important facts.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high percentage of college binge drinkers are white males under the legal drinking age of 21 who find cheap or free alcohol at fraternity parties or local bars, according to a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health. "Students today come to college expecting to drink," said Henry Wechsler, director of Harvard's College Alcohol Studies Program. "They think that's what you're supposed to do in college, and they find plenty of ways to do it."
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 90 minutes, UC Davis senior David Thornton sat at an off-campus watering hole and pounded shot after shot of alcohol as he and friends celebrated his 21st birthday April 3. But after he consumed 21 drinks in a college coming-of-age ritual known as "21 for 21"--downing everything from tequila to bourbon to whiskey as quickly as possible--something went terribly wrong. Thornton passed out and later died at a local hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1998 | JOHN SICKLICK, President of MADD, Los Angeles County Chapter
MADD's position is that we have a zero tolerance for underage drinking; in the U.S., that is anyone under 21. We support the drinking age set at 21 and helped get it raised in the 1980s when some states dropped it to 18. I think it's a fantasy to think if you give kids alcohol at home that they won't do something dangerous with it. A lot of parents think that the situation is under control if it's going on in front of them. It's not just the issue of drinking and driving that makes it dangerous.
NEWS
October 12, 2010
With the new school year underway, some college students are spending the year abroad. In addition to hitting the books and taking in the sights, they may also be drinking a lot more, a new study suggests. University of Washington researchers surveyed 177 study abroad students about their drinking habits before they departed for their new host country, during their stay (an average three to five months), and on their return. Overall, drinking more than doubled while abroad, but returned to pre-travel levels when the students returned.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The maker of Four Loko, the malt liquor beverage that once was made with caffeine, on Tuesday agreed to sharply curb its marketing of the fruit-flavored drinks as part of a legal settlement with 20 state attorneys general and San Francisco City Atty. Dennis Herrera.  The settlement comes nearly four years after Phusion Projects, based in Chicago, voluntarily removed caffeine from its drinks in 2010 shortly before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration definitively banned the stimulant as an ingredient in alcoholic beverages.
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