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Binge Drinking

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2008 | SANDY BANKS
The guys from Sigma Nu were one pitcher of beer into a game of "baseball" when I took a seat at their table in USC's on-campus bar and asked for an interview. I wanted to know how they felt about the suggestion by a group of college presidents that the legal drinking age be lowered to 18. They wanted to finish their drinking game. It involved flipping quarters into cups of beer representing base hits and downing the drink the coin landed in. So we talked while they drank.
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HEALTH
May 8, 2006 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
IN recounting her battles with alcohol, author Koren Zailckas doesn't skimp on the details -- her first drink at 14, the years of blackouts and hangovers, waking up in a strange man's apartment and, finally, her embrace of sobriety at the ripe old age of 22. Her story is notable because she crafted it into a bestselling book, "Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood," not because it's rare.
SCIENCE
December 15, 2009 | By Melissa Healy
The federal government's annual report of kids' alcohol and drug abuse seems reassuring: Compared with earlier in the decade, use of hallucinogens was down in 2008, marijuana use was way down, and use of methamphetamines was way, way down. But the researchers and public officials who crunch those numbers warned that some of the statistics gleaned from an annual survey of 46,000 American eighth-, 10th- and 12th-graders were worrisome. Though drug and alcohol use seems to be declining or holding steady, there has been slippage in teen disapproval of such practices and perception of the risks, officials warned.
SCIENCE
July 12, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Cigarette smoking hit the lowest point ever recorded among American eighth-graders, high school sophomores and seniors last year, a newly released report shows. Last year, only 5% of high school sophomores said they had smoked cigarettes daily in the last 30 days, compared with 18% of sophomores who were smoking daily at one point in the 1990s. The numbers have also plunged for eighth-graders and high school seniors, hitting their lowest point since the surveys began. The change is just one of the findings in a vast new report on the well-being of American children, compiled by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.
NEWS
December 7, 2008 | Kristen Gelineau, Gelineau writes for the Associated Press.
The blood oozes crimson from a jagged gash in the man's head onto the starched white hospital sheet. A booze-fueled bar brawl has left his face shredded, his brain damaged. Across the emergency room, a clammy-skinned patient who smells like a brewery curls into a fetal position on his gurney, recovering from a near-fatal combination of alcohol and pills. On a Saturday, St. Vincent's Hospital in the heart of Sydney's night life district becomes, in Dr. Gordian Fulde's weary words, "a war zone" of Australia's alcohol casualties.
OPINION
March 7, 1999 | DAVID SATCHER, David Satcher is surgeon general of the United States
Wine producers recently won permission to display new labels on their bottles that urge consumers to learn more about "the health effects of wine consumption." Realizing that some people may not have time to consult their doctors on this matter--and as a result they may draw an incorrect message from these labels--I would like to share a few important facts.
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 90 minutes, UC Davis senior David Thornton sat at an off-campus watering hole and pounded shot after shot of alcohol as he and friends celebrated his 21st birthday April 3. But after he consumed 21 drinks in a college coming-of-age ritual known as "21 for 21"--downing everything from tequila to bourbon to whiskey as quickly as possible--something went terribly wrong. Thornton passed out and later died at a local hospital.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A high percentage of college binge drinkers are white males under the legal drinking age of 21 who find cheap or free alcohol at fraternity parties or local bars, according to a new study by the Harvard School of Public Health. "Students today come to college expecting to drink," said Henry Wechsler, director of Harvard's College Alcohol Studies Program. "They think that's what you're supposed to do in college, and they find plenty of ways to do it."
NEWS
November 9, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Alcohol policies surrounding football tailgating parties are common at many universities. Some schools ban alcohol at tailgating events entirely, others restrict alcohol to certain areas of the parking lots and others ban it during certain time periods, such as 30 minutes before kickoff. A new study shows that a majority of tailgaters were already well on their way to high blood-alcohol concentrations before the start of a college football game. Researchers from the University of Toledo studied tailgaters at a large Midwest college football game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1998 | JOHN SICKLICK, President of MADD, Los Angeles County Chapter
MADD's position is that we have a zero tolerance for underage drinking; in the U.S., that is anyone under 21. We support the drinking age set at 21 and helped get it raised in the 1980s when some states dropped it to 18. I think it's a fantasy to think if you give kids alcohol at home that they won't do something dangerous with it. A lot of parents think that the situation is under control if it's going on in front of them. It's not just the issue of drinking and driving that makes it dangerous.
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